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EDITORIAL    INDEX— PAGE    169. 


BUYERS'    DIRECTORY— PAGE    153. 


ADVERTISING   INDEX— PAGE    170. 


GnadianMachinery 

^vs>  MANUFACTURING  NEWS  ^ 

A    weekly    newspaper    covering    in   a    practical   manner   the    mechanical,    power,   foundry    af  d    allied   fields. 
Published  by  The  MacLean  Publishing   Company,    Limited,   Toronto,    Montreal,   Winnipeg  and   London,   Eng. 


Vol.  XVIII— No.   10 


Publication  Office:      Toronto,  September  6,    1917 


Subscription  Pr 


C  A  IS  A  D  I  A  N    M  A  C  H  1  N  !•]  K  Y 


SMALL  TOOLS 


p.  &  W.  Adjustable 
BLADE   REAMERS 


These  leaniers  have  eeceiitiic  relief  and  can 
be  set  to  size  without  regrinding-.  They  are 
unexcelled  for  design  and  simplicity  and  ease 
of  adjustment.  The  eccentrically  relieved 
blades  are  stronger  than  others,  do  uut  chat- 
ter, and  produce  a  smoother  hole.  The  hand, 
shell  and  tinted  chucking  reamers  have  inter- 
changeable nuts,  screws  and  wrenches.  The 
bottom  of  a  hole  can  readily  be  faced.  By  a 
simple  adjustment  of  the  ])lades  the  reamers 
can  easily  be  set  t(i  size  ^\•ithout  regrinding. 

PROMPT    SERVICE 

is  assureil  at  our  nearest  store,  wliero  V.  fk  W . 
Small  Tools  are  carried  in  stock.  Place 
\(<[\v  order  tliere  t(i-dav. 


Precision    Machine    Tools    Standards    and    Gauges 

JPRATT&WHITNEYCO! 

of  Canada,  Limited 

Works:    DUNDAS,    ONTARIO 

MONTREAL  TORONTO  WINNIPEG  VANCOUVER 

723  Drummond  Bldg.  1002  C.P.R.  Bldg.  1205  McArthur  Bldg.  B.C.  Equipment  Co. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


ACME 
BOLT  CUTTERS 

All    Standard  Sizes    from 
>^ -inch  to  6-inch  Capacity 


Supplied  with  Leadscrew  Attachment  for  Stay  Bolts  or  other  work  requiring: 
special  Accuracy  of  Pitch. 

WRITE  US  FOR  FUIX  DETAILS  ON  ANY  MACHINE  OR  MACHINES 
IN  WHICH  YOU  ARE  INTERESTED 

The    John    Bertram    &   Sons   Company 

Limited 

DUNDAS,  ONTARIO,  CANAD 

MONTREAL  TORONTO  VANCOUVER  WINNIPEG 

723  Drummond  Bldg.  1002  C.P.R.  Bldg.        609  Bank  of  Ottawa  Bldg.        1205  Mc Arthur  Bldg. 


//   any   advertisement   interests   you,   tear  it   out   now   and  place   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


On  Optimism 


'T^HE  cessation  of  munitions 
-*■  orders  has  caused  our  manufac- 
turers to  look  with  redoubled  atten- 
tion to  their  old  lines  and  to  such  of 
the  new  ones  as  the  requirements  of 
present  needs  indicate  as  best. 

Admittedly,  things  are  unsettled. 
They  always  are  in  the  period  of 
transition.  Yet  everywhere  we  go 
we  find  unbounded  optimism.  For 
it  is  obvious  that  the  needs  of  the  war 
while  it  lasts  are  such  as  to  tax  the 
entire  productive  facilities  of  Can- 
ada and  the  world.  So  if  we  are  not 
to  make  munitions,  certainly  we  will 
make  other  things. 

The  munitions  period  just  ended 
has  been  a  liberal  education  to  the 
Canadian  manufacturer.  He  now 
has  an  organization,  funds  and  ex- 
perience to  tackle  anything  in  rea- 
son. 


His  interests  have  broadened  with 
the  present  need  and  opportunity. 

It  is  not  his  alone.  It  is  every- 
body's who  buys  from  him  or  sells 
to  him. 

He  is  in  the  market  now  for  big- 
ger things  and  more  things  than  he 
has  ever  been. 

And  this  is  where  our  service  in 
Canadian  Machinery  comes  in.  We 
will  put  each  manufacturer  in  touch 
with  the  other,  so  that  all  their  needs 
will  be  supplied. 

Our  services  as  pioneers  in  the 
education  of  manufacturers  in 
munitions  making  are  well  known. 
And  so,  as  in  the  past,  we  will  en- 
deavor here  to  offer  you  the  broad 
service  of  reflecting  the  needs  and 
opportunities  of  the  moment,  as 
fast  as  they  occur,  and  how  best  to 
profit  by  them. 


September  6,  1917 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  N    M  A  C  11  I  X  E  R  Y 


If   any   advertisement    interests    you,    tear   it    out    now    and   place    with    letters  to  be  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


//  what  you  7ieed  is  not  advertised,    coiisult 


Buyers'    Directory   and   write   advertisers    listed   under   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  D I A  N    MACHINERY 


Turning  Two 

Crank  Shaft 

Bearings 

at  the  Same  Time 

with  a 

Two-Carriage 

Bridgeford 


One  Way  of 

Increasing 

Production. 


EARLY  DELIVERIES  on  these  Heavy  Forge  Lathes. 


27 '  Bridgeford  Heavy  Forge  Lathes 

With  any  length  bed  for  rapid  and  accurate  production 
on  heavy  shafts  and  forgings. 

Full  Swing         -         -         -         -         27" 
Swings  over  Carriage     -         -  13'/^" 

Distance  between  Centres,  12'  Bed     6' 

WRITE  FOR  INFORMATION— TO-DAY. 

Bridgeford  Machine  Tool  Works 

161  WINTON  ROAD  -:-  ROCHESTER,  N.Y. 


//   any   advertisement   interests   you,   tear  it   out   now   and   place   with   letters  to  be  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


16«   Forming   Turret  Lathe 


IS^    Turret  Lathe 


21"  X  m  Sc 


Meet  War  Time  Demands 


The  Acme  Machine  Tool  Co. 

Cincinnati,  Ohio,  U.S.A. 

Code  Word:    ACME 

CANADIAN    AGENTS:     RUDEL-BELNAP 
MACHINE  CO..   MONTREAL,  TORONTO 


For  fast  and  accurate  work  that  conditions  now 
demand,  Cincinnati  Acme  Screw  Machines  and 
Turret  Lathes  are  right  up  in  the  front  rank.  Used 
in  the  best  shops  of  the  world,  and  give  the  best  of 
satisfaction  in  efficiency  and  economy  in  production. 
The  Screw  Machines  are  made  in  five  sizes,  11"  to  20"  swine, 
%"  to  2iy4"  capacity.  The  Turret  Lathes  are  made  in  four 
sizes,  l-t"  to  20"  swing. 

It  will  pay  you  to  investigate  the  possibilities  of  the  Cincin- 
nati Acme  in  your  shop. 

Write  to-day. 


CANADIAN  MANUFACTURERS 

are   you  using   Steel 

MADE  IN  CANADA? 


vorks    at 


Works:  LONGUEUIL,  QUE. 


We  are  manufacturing  at  out 
LONGUEUIL,  QUE. 

SPECIAL    HIGH    SPEED  AND  CARBON 

TOOL  STEELS.  MISCELLANEOUS 

SHOP  TOOLS,  GAUGES,  Etc. 

ARMSTRONG  WHITWORTH  of  CANADA 

LIMITED 
HEAD  OFFICE  :     298-300   St.    James  St.,    Montreal 

27    King   William    Street,   HAMILTON 
Branches:      Dominion  Bank  Bldg.,  TORONTO 

McArthur  Bldg.,  WINNIPEG,  MAN. 


Coal 
Coke 
Iron  Ore 


pi^  Iron 

'      '  "Pictorial    FOUNDRY  &  MALLEABLE 


Made  by  The   Canadian   Furnace  Co. 
Port  Colborne,  Ontario,   Canada. 

f1.A.HANNA&.C0. 

Sales  Agents,  CLEVELAND 

Canadian    Office: 

703  C.P.R.  Bldg.,  Toronto 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,   cons^dt  our  Buyers'  Directory  and  write  advertisers  listed  under  proper  heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Solid     .Maim-aiu'sc     Steel 

Intersection  for  Montreal 

Tramways  Company. 


rasti'^^ 


For  Hydraulic,  Mill  Gear,  Locomotive, 
Rolling  Stock,  Marine — in  fact  we 
make  castings  of  any  size  and  any 
kind — Manganese,  Vanadium,  Titani- 
um, Chrome,  Nickel,  etc.  Dependable 
products  always. 


Canadian  Steel  Foundries,  limited 

MONTREAL  WELLAND 


We  guarantee  shipment 

within  24  hours  of 

receipt  of  order 


Made  in 
Sweden 
from  selected 
Dannemora  Ore 


We  also  carry  in  stock 
Solid  and  Hollow  Drill 
Steel,  Die  Blocks,  "SIS- 
CO"  Welding  Wire,  Drill 
Rod  and  Swedish  Iron. 


Swedish  Steel  &  Importing  Co.,  Ltd. 


MONTREAL,    QUE 


The  Life  of  a  Thread  Miller 

Depends  not  upon  the  amount  of  work  it  does, 
but  the  ease  and  thoroughness  with  which  the 
work  is  done.  These  Thread  Millers  are  noted 
for  these  qualities.  Its  quality  of  work  is  un- 
rivalled. Our  Service  Department  will  give 
you  all  the  particulars.     Write  us! 


If   any    advertisement    interests    you,    tear    it    out    now    and   place    with     letters  (o  be  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


THE  JOHNSON  FRICTION  CLUTCH 


HAS  CHANGED  POWER  TRANSMISSION 


"Johnsons''  Drive  Direct  from  Line  Shafting 


^PV 


Single  Clutch-Inter 


Joliiisoii  Fi'ietiou  Clutches  mouuted  over  every  machine 
allows  aii}^  machine  to  be  stopped  or  started  at  the  will 
of  the  opei-ator  while  the  others  are  still  running.  This 
method  eliminates  the  cross  belting  from  the  regular 
line  shaft  to  the  coimter-shafting  and  consumes  a  great 
deal  less  power.  There  is  only  one-half  the  transmission 
equipment  necessary  when  the  countershafting  is  elimin- 
ated, which  means  one-half  le?s  initial  cost,  one-half  less  friction,  one- 
half  less  trouble  and  repair,  one-half  less  .space  occupied,  and  a 
cleaner,  neater  and  lighter  machine  room.  Althougli  small  in  size 
the  Johnson  Friction  Clutch  is  designed  to  drive  co  nsiderable  power  at  high  speeds.  It  works  in  a  field 
of  its  own,  as  we  do  not  build  a  clutch  to  handle  more  than  40  H.P.  at  1,000  R.P.^I. 

It  is  the  clutch  the  conservative  engineers  specify.  Let  us  help  you  derive  clutch  .satisfaction.  We  have 
the  clutch  for  your  requirements.  Write  for  our  booklet,  "Clutches  as  applied  in  Machine  Building," 
and  our  yellow  data  sheets. 

Canada:  Williams  &  Wilson,  Ltd.,  320  St.  James  St. .  Montreal:  Can.  Fairbanks-Morse  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
England:  The  Efandem  Co.,  159  Gt.  Portland  St.,  London,  W.,  Sole  Agents  British  Isle.?. 
Australia:  Edwin  Wood,  Pty.,  Hardware  Chambers,  231  Elizabeth  St.,  Melbourne,  Victoria. 


THE  CARLYLE  JOHNSON  MACHINE  CO.  manchestfh 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consult  our  Buyers'  Directory  and    write  advertisers   listed   under  proper  heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


JENCKES   CLASS  DB-2 
AIR  COMPRESSOR 

If  you  understand  compressors  look 
over  the  following  outline.  If  you 
are  not  acquainted  with  these  ma- 
chines it  would  delight  us  to  give 
you  an  introduction. 

Inlet  Valves  are  of  the  Corliss  type, 
the  outlet  valves  of  the  disc  type; 
flood  type  lubrication,  allowing  a 
continuous  flood  of  oil  over  bear- 
ings, crank  pins,  etc.,  while  in 
motion.  Machine  of  the  enclosed 
type. 


The 


JENCKES  CLASS    CB-1 
AIR  COMPRESSOR 

If  your  requirements  do  not  justify 
either  of  the  above  machines,  just 
bear  in  mind  that  we  have  a  very 
comprehensive  range  that  will 
cover  all  usual  and  unusual  needs. 
The  above  is  equipped  with  inlet 
and  outlet  disc  valves;  splash 
gravity  lubrication  system;  extra 
large  bearings;  machine  entirely 
enclosed. 


Jenckes  Machine 

Works:      St.  Catharines,  Ont. 
Works:      Sherbrooke,  Que. 


Company,  Limited 

SALES  OFFICES:  710  C.P.R.  Bldg..  Toronto; 
908  E.T.  Bank  Bldg..  Montreal :  West  Chester 
Ave..  St.  Catharines ;  Cobalt,  Ont.  :  Exchange 
Bldg..   Vancouver. 


DOUBLE 


MUSHET 

^^  High  Speed  Steel 

Carbon  Steel 

Gauge  Steel 

Alloy  Steels 


SOLE  MAKERS 

Samuel  Osborn  &  Co.  Ltd. 

SHEFFIELD 


Twist  Drills  and 
Reamers^  Milling 
Cutters  and    Slit- 
ting Saws 


Sam'l  Osborn  (Canada) 

Limited 

Head  Office  and  Works:    Montreal,  P.Q. 

Branch  Office:    Toronto,  Ontario 


//   any   advertisement    interests   you,   tear   it   out   now   and  place    with  letters  to  be  answered. 


10 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


The  Ford-SiRitfeMactMi^Cajnpany 


Adv  t.  No.  3 


Miller  Series 


JUST  A  FEW  REASONS  WHY  OUR  MILLERS  ARE 
PROVING  BOTH  SERVICEABLE  AND  PROFITABLE 


Reason  No.  1 . 
Reason  No.  2. 
Reason  No.  3. 
Reason  No.  4. 


Large  amount  of  Power  delivered  to  Cutter. 
Ease  of  Feed  and  Cutting  Speed  Changes. 
Centralized  Control  of  Machine. 
Large  capacity  of  Table  and  Vise. 


THERE  ARE  OTHER  REASONS,  WHICH  WE  HAVE  NO 
CHANCE  TO  TELL  YOU  OF  HERE— SUPPOSE  YOU  DROP 
US  A  POST  CARD  FOR  OUR  CATALOG— IT  TELLS  THE  DETAILS. 

The    Ford -Smith    Machine    Company,   Limited 


HAMILTON 


ONTARIO 


CANADA 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,   consult 


Buyers^   Directory 


write  advertisers   listed  under  proper  heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Sheet  Metal  Working  Machinery 


of  any  description 

For 

Quality     Efficiency 
Durability        Speed 

they  are  unsurpassed. 


NO  7  SCREW  PRESS 


NO  100  GEARED 
POWER  PUNCH 


The  Brown,  Boggs  Company,  Limited 


Hamilton,    Ont. 

Manufacturers : 

Tinsmiths',   Heavy   Sheet  Metal 

Working     Machinery,    Canners' 

and  Evaporating  Machinery. 


NO.  300  ARCH  PRESS 


NO.  6  COMBINED 
RING   and   CYLINDER   SHEARS 


//   any   advertiseinent   interests   you,    tear  it   out   now   and   place    with  letters  to  be  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIIT. 


ECONOMY 


^s^JI=^^v^ 


UNIFORMITY 


AMACOL 
TENAXAS 


ATLAS 
MASCOT 


TIN  TOUGHENED  ^  W.  E.  W.  BABBITT 


s^iS> 


HAVE  A  WORLD-WIDE  REPUTATION  FOR  UNIFORMITY 


ATLAS  Alloys  are  scientific  products— the  result  of  much  patient  research 
and  long  years  of  experience.  They  are  manufactured  under  the  most 
modern  scientific  conditions,  thereby  eliminating  any  element  of  chance  in 
their  composition  and  ensuring  a  standard  maintenance  of  quality  and 
uniformity. 

ATLAS  Brands    are    not   alloys  that    sometimes  give    satisfaction.       They    are 
alloys  that    can  be  implicitly  relied  upon  always.     They    are  alloys  with 
our  prestige  and  reputation  always  behind  them. 

DO  not  let  prejudice  stand  between   you   and  profit.     You   can    obtain  the 
maximum    efficiency;  from  your  plant  at  a  minimum  of  cost  by  using   ATLAS 
BABBITTS. 

THERE  IS  AN  ATLAS  BRAND  TO  MEET  ANY  NEED 


NO  SHOCK  TOO  SEVERE 


NO  WEIGHT  TOO  HEAVY 


NO  SPEED  TOO  GREAT 


Atlas  Metal  and  Alloys  Company  of  Canada,  Limited 

MONTREAL 
Sales  Agents: 

The    Canadian    B.  K.    Morton  Co.,   Limited 


MONTREAL 

49  Common  Street 

Phone  M.  3206 


TORONTO 

86   Richmond  Street  East 

Phones  M.  1472-1473 


l^ss 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consult   our   Buyers'   Directory   and    irrite   advertisers    listed   under   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


13 


LeBLOND 

Heavy  Duty  Milling 
Machines 

Plain  or  Universal  Types — 
Cone  or  Gear  Drive.  All  commer- 
cial sizes  No  0  to  No.  5. 

Adapted  for  the  Heaviest 
Manufacturing  or  the  most  exact- 
ing tool  room  service.  A  suitable 
Range  and  Capacity  for  every  class 
of  milling. 

Patent  Self-Aligning  Arbor  Supports — ■ 
Hardened  Steel  Spindle  Bearings — 
Double-Friction   Back   Gears — and   the 
simplest  type  of  right-hand  control,  con- 
tribute  to    an    increased   production    and 
longer  life  as  a  precision  machine. 

The  R.  K.  LeBIond  Machine 
Tool  Company 

CINCINNATI,  OHIO,  U.S  A. 


"ULTRA  CAPITAL"  HIGH  SPEED  STEEL 

Balfour's  Tool  Steel 


(( 


CAPITAL"  HIGH  SPEED  TWIST  DRILLS 


MANUFACTURED  BY 

Arthur  Balfour  &  Co.,  Limited 

Dannemora  Steel  Works, 

Sheffield,  England. 


The  Eagle  &  Globe  Steel  Company,  Limited 


Head  Office,  Canada  and  U.S. 
Ontario  Office  and  Warehouse 
Winnipeg  Stock 
Vancouver  Stock 


128  Craig  Street  West,  Montreal 

36  Colborne  Street,  Toronto 

Dominion  Equipment  &  Supply  Co.   Limited 

Frank  Darling  &  Co. 

W.  A.  BRADBURY,  Agent,   128  Craig  Street  West,  Montreal 


//   any   advertisement   interests   yon,   tear  it   out   now   and   place   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


C  A  N  A  D  1  A  N    Jl  A  C  II I  N  E  R  Y 


Volume  XVIII. 


1 

mmlim 

^^^P^^^^^^H^^^^^^H 

THE  FINEST  QUALlTi 

HJGH-SPEED  STEEL 

IN  EXISTENCE 

By  using-  Uranium  in  our  process  of  steel  making, 
we  have  produced  a  truly  remarkable  combination  of 
those  two  most  desirable  qualities,  toujrhness  and 
strength. 

Through  the  consistent  maintenance  of  quality, 
workmanship,  and  the  exclusive  use  of  automatically 
regulated  furnaces,  which  eliminate  all  possible 
chance  of  human  fallibility,  we  are  able  to  produce  a 
very  high  grade  of  High-Speed  Steel. 

"Electrite-Uranium"    has    an    exceptional    cutting 
ability.     It   is    increasing   the   users'   output   every- 
where.    Give  it  a  trial. 

We  can   make    immediate    deliveries   on   bars   of 
regular  sizes. 

Latrobe  Electric  Steel  Co. 

LATROBE,  PENNA. 

SALES  OFFICES: 

1G5     Broadway.     New     York,                198    Cleveland   Ave..    Buffalo. 

N.Y.                                                           First    National    Bank    Bldg.. 
Monroe    and    Jefferson    Sta..                   Pittsburgh. 

Chicago.                                                   664  Spitzer  BIdg..  Toledo. 
40    Central    St..    Boston.                        2230-2240   9th   St..   Cleveland. 
2S02     Union     Central     Bldg.,               Commercial    Trust    Building, 

Cincinnati.                                                   Philadelphia. 
Conover  Bldg..  Dayton.                          1001   Ford  Bldg..  Detroit.                 ,, 

mimm 

•September  6,  1917. 


C  A  M  A  D I A  N    MACHINERY 


ESTABLISHED  1870 


W"  ATKINS  &  C"  r 


TRADE     MARK 


WACO 


Reliance  Steel  Works 
SHEFFIELD,  ENG. 


TRADE     mark: 


Brand 


High  Speed  Steel  and  Twist  Drills 


"DOUBLE  WACO"  Quality 

Specially  Adapted  for  all  kinds  of 
MUNITION  WORK 

"Turtle"  Brand 

High  Class  Tool  Steel,  Files,  etc. 

of  all  descriptions. 

For    particulars   apply  to   our 

Sole  Representatives  for  Canada 

GEO.  A.  MARSHALL  &  CO. 

70  Lombard  Street       Toronto,  Ontario 


//   any   advertisement   interests   you,   tear  it   out   now   and  place    with   letters  to  be  answered. 


CANADIAN     MACHINERY  Volume  XVIII. 


One  of  the 

Steels  of  the  Century 

Centurion  High-Speed 


Made  from  the  BEST  Materials 

Iron,  Tungsten,  Chrome,  Vanadium 

Melted  by  the  BEST  Process 

The  Crucible  Furnace  Method 

Handled  by  the  BEST  Workmen 

Melters,  Forgemen,  Annealers,  Metallurgists 

CONSEQUENTLY 

Will  do  the  BEST  Work 

Quality  Delivery  Service 

We  have  a  catalog  waiting  for  you.    Write  for  it. 

THE  CENTURY  STEEL  CO.  OF  AMERICA 

MANUFACTURERS  OF  HIGH-GRADE  CRUCIBLE  STEELS 

Works  :  Sales  Offices  : 

POUGHKEEPSIE,  120  BROADWAY, 

N.Y.  NEW  YORK 


//  ivhat  i/ou   need  is  not  advertised.   coytsuJt   our   Buyers*   Directory   and   write   advertisers   listed   under   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  N    M  A  C  H  I  N  E  R  Y 


SPECIMEN  CUTTINGS  MADE  WITH 

URANIUM 

HIGH  SPEED  TOOLS 


Note  Depth  of  Cut  on  the  Tests  Below 


Tool— 

Feed 

Speed 
Ft.  Per 
Minute 

Depth 
of  Cut 

Material  cut  before 
grinding. 

U-8   

1/16" 

4.S 

fs"  to  3^" 

Ran  87"  most  of  time  the 

nose  of  tool  was  on  scale. 

U-8 

1/16"  to  1/10" 

38 

15/16" 

Ran    127".       Time   3    hr. 
Speed   increased   to   65    ft. 
p.  m.  after  tool   had   gone 
105". 

U-8 

1/16" 

60 

1  1/16" 

Ran  12". 

See  your  tool  steel  man  or  write  us 


STANDARD  ALLOYS  COMPANY 


Forbes  and  Meyran  Aves. 


PITTSBURGH,  PA. 


//   any   advertisement   interests   you,   tear  it   out   now   and   place    with   letters  to  be  answered. 


18 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


FINISHING    the   profile 
iif  S-in.  Howitzer  shells 
made   from   rolled  steel 
forgings. 

The  cut  start*;  at  a  speed 
exceeding  200  ft.  per  min. 
and  machines  the  surface  9 
in.  long  in  1  min.  24  sec. 

The  tool  is  given  a  feed  of  Va  in. 
per  revolution  and  imparts  a 
highly  finished  surface  to  the 
work. 

An  output  of  55  shells  per  grind- 
ing is  maintained  easily. 

An  instance  of  extreme  condi- 
tions which  Stellite  is  meeting 
successfully  every  day. 

Stellite  is  harder  and  tougher 
than  steel.  Cuts  longer  and  25 
to  300  f,  faster.  Requires  no 
forging,  and  cuts  as  well  when 
running  at  red  heat  as  when 
cold — does  not  lose  its  temper. 
Convince  yourself  that  STEL- 
LITE stands  behind  bigger 
production  and  tool  economy  by 
giving  it  a  try-out. 


Speed  Tool  Metal 


Deloro  Smelting  &  Refining  Co.,  Limited,     ^LtLoRa  ont 


Toronto,  200  King  St.,  West 


Montreal,  315  Craig  Street,  West 


If  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,  consjilt    our   Buyers*   Directory   and   write   advertisers    listed   under   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  x\    MACHINERY 


Nova  Scotia  Steel  &  Coal  Company 


— Limitett 

New  Glasgow,  Nova  Scotia,  Canada 


FINISHED    COUPLIXG    SHAFT,   18   IX.   DIASIXTEB  BY   21    FT.    I-ONG. 

Heavy  Marine  Engine  Forgings  in 
the  Rough  or  Finish  Machined 

Our  Steel  Plant  at  Sydney  Mines,  N.S.,  together  with  our  Steam  Hydraulic  Forge  Shop 
and  modernly  equipped  Machine  Shop  at  New  Glasgow,  N.S.,  place  us  in  position  to 
supph  promptly  Marine  Engine  Crank  and  Propeller  Shafting,  Piston  and  Connect- 
ing Rods;  also  Marine  and  Stationary  Steam  Turbine  Shafting  of  all  diameters  and 
lengths,  either  as  forgings  or  complete  ready  for  installation,  and  equal  to  the  best  on 

the  American  Contment. 


//   any  advertisement   interests   you,   tear  it   out   now   and  place   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


20 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


IF  YOU  WAN!  THE 

EST 

ASE  PLUGS. 

UY 

ANFIELD'S 

Have  in  stock  for  immediate  shipment  either  threaded 
or  bevel  Plugs  for  4.5,"  5"  and  6"  High  Explosive  Shells. 
These  are  shipped  subject  to  acceptance  of  Government 
inspector  at  your  plant. 


Capacity,  3,000  per  day. 


Write  for  prices. 


EDWIN   J.  BANFIELD 


STAIR  BLDG. 


TORONTO,  ONT. 


Manufacturer  of  Plug  Milling  Machines   for  above  size   shells.      Prices   and  deliveries 

on  application. 


The  Lathe  that  Stands  the  Test 


Hepb 


urn 


Shell  work  thoroughly  tests  the  ability  of  a  lathe.  The 
Hepburn  Lathe  is  making  a  wonderful  record  in  the  muni- 
tion plants  of  Canada  in  boring  up  to  6"  shells.  It  has 
shown  superior  speed  and  superior  quality  of  work  and 
keeps  right  at  it  day  in  and  day  out.  We  also  rebuild  lathes 
embodying  in  them  all  latest  improvements. 


The  Hepburn  is  the  lathe  for  you. 


John  T.  Hepburn,  Limited 

18-60  Van  Home  St.,        TORONTO,  ONTARIO 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consult    our   Buyers'   Directory   and   write   advertisers    listed    under   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


LIMITED 


32  FRONT  ST.  WEST, 


TORONTO 


TELEPHONE  MAIN  5346 


LODGE  &  SHIPLEY  ENGINE  LATHES 


EQUIPMENT 

Lathes,  unless  otherwise  specified,  are  regu- 
larly furnished  with  large  and  small  face 
plates,  quick-change  gears,  power  cross 
feed,  steady  rest,  countershaft,  and  neces- 
sary wrenches. 


FOR  THREAD  CUTTING 

For  convenience  of  operation  while  thread- 
cutting  a  chasing  dial  is  furnished,  so  that 
operator  can  catch  the  thread  at  the  com- 
mencement of  each  successive  cut 


Lodge  &  Shipley  Engine  Lathe  with  double  back  gear: 
Muick-change  gears. 


Write  us  for  prices  and  illustrations 


METAL  and  WOODWORKING  MACHINERY  of  aH  Kinds 


For  Export  and  Import— 

1  Iron  —  Steel  —  Metals 

^   Machinery,  Raw  Products  and  Manufactured 
=  Goods 


A.   G.    KIDSTON   ^    CO. 

with  offices  in 
LONDON  GLASGOW  MONTREAL  NEW  YORK 

AUSTRALIA  NEW^  ZEALAND  SOUTH  AFRICA 

and    connections   all   over   the   civilized    world,   have   exceptional 
advantages  for  the  marketing  of  Canadian  and  other  products. 
Enquiries  invited  and  promptly  handled. 


Manager  for  Canada  and  U.S.A.: 
C.    E.    GAUSDEN,    17    ST.    JOHN    STREET, 

Cables:  "KIDCO,"  Montreal 


MONTREAL 


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22 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  N    M  A  C  IT  I  N  E  Ic  Y 


Volume  XVIIl. 


Powerful,  Fast,  Efficient 

Lathes  are  our  specialty  and  all  our  designs  reflect  the  most  modern  ideas  of 
construction,  but  this  type  of  Engine  Lathe  herewith  illustrated  represents  a 
masterpiece  of  Waleott  ingenuity.  A  combination  of  power,  speed  and  accuracy 
are  welded  tog-ether  in  it  in  such  a  manner  as  to  guarantee  maximum  results 
every  minute  of  the  day. 

A  few  points  of  its  ideal  construction:  Has  double  apron  plate,  drop  forged  gear 
m  apron;  rigid  compound  rest;  back  gear  arm  reinforced  by  one-piece  gear  guard 
and  headstock,  not  a  single  tooth  exposed;  feed  gears  run  in  oil;  large  frontway  on 
bed;  rod  and  screw  feed,  and  quick-change  gear  box. 

Made  in  14",  16",  18",  20",  26"  and  28"  sizes 

Let  Waleott  Engineers  advise  you.    Thirty-six  years'  experience. 

Waleott  Lathe  Company  ^sfeT  Jackson,  Mich. 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,   consult   our   Buye 


ite  advertisers   listed   under  proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Just  Noy\f — 

we  have  two  4.5  machines  ready  for  immediate  delivery 


THIS  Baud  Turning  Machine,  by  its 
ability  to  perform  efficiently  month 
after  month  under  exceptional  production 
strains,  has  proved  its  worth  to  munition 
makers.  It  is  being  used  by  many  Cana- 
dian munition  plants,  where  it  is  giving 
absolute  satisfaction. 

A  glance  over  some  of  the  features  will 
interest  you. 

Integral   (en  bloc)   construction  assures 


perfect  rigidity,  permanent  accuracy  and 
desirable  compactness. 

Chucking  with  spring  collet  chuck  in- 
sures accurate  and  speedy  chucking. 

Graduated  feed  dial,  two  cutting  tools, 
and  ample  belt  power  insure  outnut  of 
accurate  work  in  least  possible  time. 

Machines  are  also  built  for  15,  18,  60-pdr. 

and  6'  shells. 


ROELOFSON  MACHINE  &  TOOL  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

Head  Offices:   1501  Royal  Bank  BIdg.,  Toronto,  Canada.     Works:  Gait,  Canada 


//    any   advertisement   interests   you,    tear   it    out    now    and   place    with    letters  to  be  ansivered. 


24 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


PUTTINO- 


IN  PREPAREDNESS 


Preparedness  is  a  coutinual  process.  It  doesn't  sto})  with  the  shiiDment  of  the  first 
ammunition  abroad.  It  involves  "getting  ready"  for  wliatever  the  future  may 
contain.  Just  now  it  is  preparing  for  MORE  war  and  the  peace  that  will  follow. 
"Sidney  for  Service"  Lathes  put  "pep"  in  preparedness.  They  speed  production. 
They  minimize  spoiled  products.  They  permit  men  to  do  maximum  duty.  They  put 
zip  and  go  into  industrial  plants.    Write  for  Bulletin  30. 


The  Sidney  Tool  Co. 

SIDNEY,  OHIO,  U.S.A. 

Represented  in  Canada  by: 

Foss  &  Hill  Machinery  Co.,  Montreal,  Que. 
H.  W.  Petrie,  Ltd.  -  Toronto,  Ont. 


LATHES 

12",  16",  18"  and  21"  swing 

Strictly   modern   in  design,  rigidity 
and  accuracy  guaranteed. 

Himoff   Machine  Company 

45  Mills  Street 
Astoria,  City  of  New  York,  N.Y. 


For  Rapid  Production 
and  Accurate  Work 


"BRIGGS 


USE  THE 


ff 


The  Briggs  Miller  handles  work  no  other  machin 
of  its  size  can  touch.       It  is  a  manufacturing  machine. 
On  account  of  its  rigid  construction  it  will  produce  accurate 
work  when  running  at  a  high  rate  of  speed  and  feed. 
The  Base  Tank  and  Large 
Gear    Pump    is   the    latest 
addition  to  its    many    ad- 
vantages.  Tank  holds 
20    gallons   of    cuttin 
lubricant 

Pump  nerer  requires  prim 


Gooley  &  Edlund 

Inc. 
Cortland,  N.Y.,  U.S.A 
Foreign  Agents :  Allied 
America,  France,  Bel- 
glum,  Italy,  Switzerland. 
Machinery  Company  of 
Russia,  Scandinavia,  C.  W.  Burton,  Grif- 
fiths &  Co.,  London,  Manchester  and  Glas- 
gow, Barandlaran,  Metivier,  Gazeau  &  Cla, 
Sail  Sebastian.  Spain. 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  N    M  A  C  H  I  N  E  R  Y 


One 
Ship- 
building 
Plant 

wrote  to  six  differ- 
ent Lathe-Builders 

and  bought  McCabe's  "2-in-i" 
Double-spindle  Lathe — on  a 
30-ft.  bed — because  it  was 
"different"  and  built  especi- 
ally for  such  a  wide  range  of 
work. 


What  other  big  Lathe  can  you  get.   and  have   full  use  of  your  Lathe,  whether  you  have 

bi^  or  small  Ti-ork? 

What    Lathe    Manufacturere    except   MoCabe    could    make   such    a    low   price   possible? 

No   other   Lathe  builder   turns   out   4a-inch    Lathes   in  such  big  lots  at  a   time,   making 

the   parts    all    duplicate   and    interchangeable. 

And    in    addition   to    the   48-inch    Triple-geared   Laithe,    the   26-iiich   is   the   "Lathe   plus" 

feature   MoCabe   oflFers   you— at   no   extra   cost. 

DOUBLE    service — convenience    and    capacity— all    described    in    Latest    Bulletins. 


J.    J.    McCABE,    149    BROADWAY,    NEW    YORK 


Improved  Centering   Machine 


Mr.  Shell 
Manufacturer: 

The  importance  of 
centering  is  obvious. 

This  tool  is  giving 
real  satisfaction 
every  day  and  stays 
on  the  job. 

Write  for  price  and 
description. 

Delivery,  ship  lo 
days  after  order. 

Shipping  weight 
2040  pounds. 


VICTORIA  FOUNDRY  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

OTTAWA,  ONTARIO 


//   any   advertisement   interests   you,    tear  it   out   now   and   place   %vith  litters  to  he  ansuered. 


26 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVm. 


A  GENERAL  PURPOSE  HEAVY  DUTY 
TURRET  LATHE 

Adapted  to  a  Wide  Range  of  Work 


Standard  Machine  Equipped  with  Tools  for  Munition  Work 


Same  Machine  Tooled  Up  for  Manufacturing  Piston  Rings 
WRITE  FOR  INFORMATION 

STEINLE  TURRET  MACHINE  COMPANY 

MADISON,  WISCONSIN,  U.S.A. 


//  tvhat  you   need  is  not  advertised,    consult    our   Buyers'   Directory   and    icritc   advertisers    listed    under   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Wbricou)l)-Blais  Jell  Laibes 


With  Ample  Power  for  the 
Heaviest  Guts 

In  the  Whitcomb-Blaisdell  I.athe  increased  poiver  is 
obtained  by  the  use  of  double-back  gears  and  a  three-stcp- 
cone  driving  pulley  carrying  an  extra  wide  belt. 

Nine  changes  of  spindle  speed  are  readily  obtainable. 
Ratios  of  gearing  are  unusually  large.  The  smallest  step 
of  cone  is  of  sufficient  diameter  to  give  ample  belt  contact. 

So  throughout  the  transmission — from  the  pulley  to  cutting 
tool — the  Whitcomb-Blaisdell  has  an  excess  of  power.  No 
cut  that  high  speed  steel  can  take  is  too  heavy  for  the 
Whitcomb-Blaisdell . 

Write  for  catalog  giving  complete  details  and 
specifications  of   Whitcomb-Blaisdell  Lathes. 


•tAXld^ 


From  14  to  30" 

/swing 


\r 


WHITCOMB-BLAISDELL 

MACHINE  TOOL  CO. 

WORCESTER,  MASS,  U.S.A. 


U   any   adveriiscrrent   interests   you,    trar   it    out    now    and  place    with    Idlers  to  be  ansivered. 


28 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


THE  LATHE  WITH  THE  PULL 


is  made  in 
14",   16".    18",    24" 


It  is  made  as  good 

as  any  machine 

can  be. 

It  is  Simple,  yet 
Efficient. 

It  is  Strong,  yet 
Accurate. 

And  it  is 
Economical. 


A  CISCO  bought  to-day  means  a  CISCO  running  in  1925; 
means  few  repairs,  means  dollars  earned,  means  worry  les- 
sened, means  shop  saving. 


Sold  in  Canada  Exclusively  by 

The  A.  R.  Williams  Machinery  Co.,  Ltd. 


Manufactured  in  Cincinnati,  U.S.A.,  by 

The  Cincinnati  Iron  &  Steel  Co. 


SETTING 
&   LOADI 


HAND  OP 
FOR  SAD 


QUIC 
POWER  R 
FOR    SA 


CUTTING -OFF 
MACHINES 

Cuts  both  ends  at  once 

except  8  in.  and  9  in.  sizes  which 
cut  one  end  only 

Forgings  load  in  one   end  and  dis- 
charge   out    the    other   when    cut 

A  Girl  can  operate  it 

-    New  quick  power  return  for  saddles 

DELIVERIES    REASONABLE 
The 

Wm.  Kennedy  &  Sons, 

Limited 
Owen  Sound 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consnlt    our   Buyers'   Directory   and   write   advertisers   listed   under   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


29 


Two 


37  Feeds 


Facts 


Utility  is  amply  proven  in  these  two  facts 
—37  feeds— IV2  to  80  threads  per  inch. 
Thi.s  range  is  obtainable  by  a  quick-change 
mechanism  mounted  on  the  form  of  the 
lathe.  The  feeds  are  illustrated  on  a  chart 
on  the  lathe.  Cone  gears  are  cut  with  20 
degree  pressure  angle  cutters  forming  a 
pointed  tooth  slightly  rounded  at  the  top. 
This  permits  engaging  of  the  gears  with- 


in to  80  Threads 
=  1-inch 


out  any  clash,  and  in  this  manner  promot- 
ing the  .speed  of  the  machine  and' length- 
ening its  life. 

These  are  a  few  of  the  points  that  .single 
this  lathe  out  as  distinctly  a  qualitj^  lathe. 

Our  agents  will  furnish  you  immediately 
with  data  and  specifications.  Inquire  of 
them. 


Mulliner-Enlund  Tool  Co.  Inc. 


Syracuse,    N.Y.,  U.S.A. 


Representative: 

H.  W.  PETRIE,  LTD. 
Toronto,  Ont. 


Representative: 

FOSS  &  HILL  MACHINERY  CO. 
Montreal,  Que. 


If  it  is  a  Question  of  Efficiency 

There  are  lathes  that  will  give  you  all  grades  of  efficiency. 
But  we  interpret  efficiency  to  mean  highest  speed  and  quality 
of  production  together  with  lowest  possible  cost.  These  fea- 
tures are  embodied  in  the  making  and  with  them  are 
associated  a  range  of  work  that  registers  from  coarse  to  the 
very  finest.  Investigate.  If  this  doesn't  meet  your  require- 
ments we  have  such  a  line  that  we  can  easily  supply  your 
wants. 

Hardinge  Bros. 


1770     Berteau 
Avenue, 

CHICAGO, 

ILL.,    U.S.A. 


SO!i 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVJ 


The 

Pinnacle 

of 

Production 

N    the  field   of  chucked 
work  the  "New  Britain" 
Multiple-Spindle        Automatic 

Chucking    Machine  occupies   a  position  of 
unquestioned  supremacy. 

Its    ability    to    perform    all    operations  simulta- 
neously and  automatically  gives    it    a    production 
capacity  three  to   five  times  that  of  other  machines 
designed  for  handling  similar  work. 

ive  you  considered  its  possibilities  for  cutting  your  costs  andreliev 
:  your  labor  stringency?        We  are  prepared  for  tlie  dcnionstratinri 


//  ivhat  you 


Biuj 


listed    under   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  I)  I  A  N     M  A  C  H  1  N  E  R  Y 


HAMIL  TON 


>♦ 


■M 


J>>-:-i 


INSTALL  the  most  modern  machinery  in 
your  plant  to  meet  the  new  conditions  of 
to-day.    You  get  it  in  Hamilton  Lathes. 

We  are  living  in  the  greatest  speed-up,  cut- 
the-cost-of-production  period  of  modern 
times.  War  time  conditions  demand  speed 
and  economy  in  the  machine  shop  as  well  as  in 
other  institutions  of  commerce.  Shops  every- 
where are  now  producing  more  work  with  the 
same  force  of  men  than  before  the  war.  The 
war  has  created  a  demand  for  the  utmost 
efficiency  and  brought  out  the  resourcefulness 
of  the  country  in  new  machinery. 

Hamilton  Lathes  represent  the  conditions  in 
the  machine  shop  and  the  spirit  of  the  times 
with  their  speed,  durability  and  accuracy. 

Write  now  for  Bulletins — yours  for  asking. 

The  Hamilton  Machine  Tool  Co. 

HAMILTON,  OHIO 

Sole  Agents  for  Ontario: 

H.  W.  PETRIF,  Limited  -  TORONTO,  ONT. 


W^- 

^^i^ 


Plduction 


m 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


^  mmm^^ 


j^\i 


i 


The  Chicago  Automatic  Screw  Machine 


The  result  of  10  years'  extensive  and  intensive  screw 
machine  manufacture.  By  an  indexing  device  one  or 
more  idle  holes  not  carrying  tools  may  be  skipped  in 
indexing  without  pause  or  loss  of  time — you  know  the 
value  of  that  feature. 


The  amount  of  usage  does  not  affect  its  efficiency.  The 
longer  it  is  used  the  more  you  benefit.  In  six  weeks  we 
can  have  a  "Chicago"  in  your  plant  ready  to  give  you 
the  same  economical  and  exceptional  service  it  has  ren- 
dered to  many  other  Canadian  plants. 


The    John    MacNab    Machinery    Company 


90  West  Street 
New  York  City 


European  Representative 
John  MacNab.  Hyde,  England 


The  Man  Who  Uses  ACME  Automatics 


The  ACME 

Automatic 

Multiple 

Spindle 

Screw 

Machine, 

Capacities 

Up  to  33^ " 

Diameter 


Ask  him  why  he  uses  them? 

He  will  tell  you  that  better  finish,  greater  production 

and  lower  cost  per  piece  were  his  reasons  for  specifying 

Acmes. 

Moreover,  the  Acme  Adaptability  to  such  operations  as 

cross  milling,  drilling,  slabbing  and  slotting  before  the 

work  leaves  the  machine  means  a  saving  in  the  cost  per 

piece  which  in  many  cases  has  paid  for  the  machine. 

Let  us  show  you  the  true  economy  of 
the  Acme  Way  Send  a  sample  or  blue 
print. 

The  National  Acme  Co. 

Cleveland  Ohio 


BRANCH  OFFICES:  NEW  YORK.  BOSTON. 
CHICAGO,  DETROIT.  ATLANTA.  SAN  FRANCISCO 
REPRESENTATIVES      IN      FOREIGN     COUNTRIES 

Makers  of  GricJley  Single  ami  Multiple  Spindle  Automatic: 
at  Windsor,  Vermont;  and  Acme  Automatics,  Thread inp 
Dies,  and  Screw  Machine  Products  at  Cleveland,  Ohio. 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consult    our   Buyers'   Directory   and   write   advertisers   listed   under   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  D I A  N    MACHINERY 


HIGhE-jr     IN     QUALiTY 


NATIONALLY     KNOWN 


Our  Country  requires  the  extreme  limit  of  production 

from  every  lathe,  planer,  miller  or  other  machine  tool 

BE    PATRIOTIC 


The   Nationally  Known   First  Quality 

HIGH   SPEED   STEEL 

Will    enable    you    greatly   to    increase   your  output 

•ITS    THE     BEST     FOR    ALL    MACHINE    WORK" 

VANADIUM-ALLOYS   STEEL   CO. 

PITTSBURGH,  PA.  Works  at  LATROBE,  PA. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


The  Vulc.in  Crucible  Steel  Company  wishes  to  announce  that 
Wolfram  will  continue  to  be  a  standard  Tungsten  High  Speed 
Steel. 

This  Company  is  progressive,  and  is  entirely  familiar  with  the 
efifects  of  the  various  alloys  that  may  be  used  in  steel,  but  until  it 
is  convinced  of  the  superiority  of  any  element  over  Tungsten, 
Wolfram  High  Speed  Steel  will  continue  to  be  a  standard 
Tungsten  Steel. 

Vulcan  Crucible  Steel  Co. 


Aliquippa 

Messrs.  Norton,  Callard  &  Co 


Established    1900 

Represented  in  Canada  by 


Pa..  U.S.A. 
Montreal,  Que. 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  D I  A  N    M  A  CHIN  E  R  Y 


35 


QUALITY 

The  rack  pinion  and  all  sliding  gears  and  other  gears  subjected  to  heavy  strain 
or  wear  are  made  of  chrome-nickel  steel.  But  this  is  not  all.  Behind  the  quality 
steel  is  our  new  modern  and  strictly  up  to  the  hour  heat  treating  department,  and 
behind  this  is  the  knowledge  of  how  to  treat  the  steel  to  get  the  result. 


Please  note,  however,  that  this  applies 
to  all  of  the  several  sizes  of  machines 
built  bv  the 


FOSTER  MACHINE 
COMPANY 

ELKHART,        INDIANA 


Saddle  Apron 


//    liny   advc)  liscment    iiiterestK    you,    tear    it    out    now    and   place    with  lettere  to  be  ai.swered. 


36 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


Let  the  ACORN  DIE 
Cut  Your  Threads 


The  adjustment  is  iiieehanieally  perfect  — 
simply  turn  the  cap  and  all  the  prongs  of  the 
die  converge  equally  —  a  great  advantage  over 
the  spring  die. 

The  Acorn  Die  Holder  is  smaller  in  diameter 
than  any  other  die  holder  of  equal  cutting  size. 

The  float  permits  the  die  to  follow  its  own 
lead. 

The  die  projects  slightly  beyond  the  adjust- 
ing cap,  making  it  admirably  adapted  for 
shoulder  work — and  the  chips  are  thrown  ahead 
of  the  work,  so  the  die  does  not  clog. 

Will  .you  try  the  Acorn  Die  on  your  own 
work — under  your  own  conditions? 


WELLS  BROTHERS  COMPANY  OF  CANADA,  Limited 

GALT       -        ONTARIO 


SALES  AGENTS:  The  Canadian    Fairbanki-Mo 


ited.   Montreal,    Tc 


St.  John.     Calga 


May  We  Repeat 
THAT 


TRADE    MARK 

QUALITY  FILES 

are  the  only  files  made  in  Canada  using  BEST 
CRUCIBLE  CAST  STEEL  exclusively  in  their  manu- 
facture. What  does  that  mean  to  the  user? 
IT  MEANS  a  keener  cutting  edge  to  the  teeth,  and 
longer  life  to  the  file.  IT  MEANS  the  stock  has  that 
"pep"  in  it  so  beloved  of  metal  workers.  IT  MEANS 
that  after  a  long  and  honorable  career  on  the  bench, 
there  is  still  fine  steel  in  the  file  vi^hich  warrants  the 
user  in  having  it  re-cut  and  put  on  the  job  again  on 
less  "fussy"  work. 

THAT   IS   TRUE   ECONOMY. 

Port  Hope  File  Mfg.  Co., 
Limited 

Port  Hope,  Ont. 

"  Ask  your  jobber  " 


U.  S.  Electric 
Drills  and  Grinders 

Save  Time,  Labor  and   Money 

They  can  be  at- 
tached to  any  lamp 
socket. 

For  drilling  in 
metal  they  are  su- 
perior to  any  other 
kind  of  portable 
drill.  Cost  50%  less 
to  run  than 
drills. 


%"  and  1% 

Universal  Motor 

DRILL. 


All  motors  wound  for 
110    or    220    volts. 
Direct    o 
current. 
Try     a     few 
Electric      Drills      and 
Grinders     and     you'll 
send  us  an  order  for 
more.       Our    guaran- 
tee   protects    you. 

For  Sale   By 

The  Canadian  Fairbanks-Morse  Co.,  Limited 

nipe^,        Calgary, 

THE  UNITED  STATES  ELECTRICAL  TOOL  CO. 

CINCINNATI,  OHIO 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,   consult   our  Buyers'   Directory   a)id   write   advertisers   listed   under   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


EED-DRENXJCE  POMPANY 

Worcester    w^  Mass.U.S.A. 


WHY  USE  A  BLUNDERBUSS? 


THERE  IS  AS  MUCH  USE  TRYING  TO  KEEP  UP  TO  THE  PACE 
SET  BY  MODERN  METHODS  WITH  OUT-OF-DATE  MACHINE  TOOLS 
AS  THERE  IS  OF  AN  "OLD  ONE-CYLINDER"  TRYING  TO  WIN  A 
RACE  AGAINST  MODERN  CARS. 

CONSIDER  THE  ADVANCEMENT  MADE  IN  CUTTING  TOOL  MATE- 
RIALS AND  HOW  LABOR  VALUtS  HAVE  CHANGED— WHY  EVEN 
OUR  CONCEPTION  OF  THE  WORD  "PRODUCTION"  HAS  TAKEN  ON 
A  NEW  MEANING. 

DON'T  GO  AFTER  PROFITS  WITH  A  BLUNDERBUSS, 
USE  MODERN  ARTILLERY. 

REED-PRENTICE    MACHINE   TOOLS   HAVE  BEEN  MADE  INCREAS- 
INGLY    EFFECTIVE     FROM     YEAR    TO     YEAR,     MAINTAINING    THEIR 
PRE-EMINENCE    A3    THE     MACHINES    WHICH    GiVE    THE    GREATEST 
OUTPUT  WITH   LEAST  LFFORT. 

REPRESENTED  BY 
THE  CANADIAN   FAIRBANKS-MORSE  CO.,  LIMITED 


If   any   advertisement   interests   you,   tear  it   out    now   and   place    with  letters  to  be  answered. 


C  A  N  A  D  I  xV  N    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII 


The  Proper 
Marking  Tools 


for  Heat,  Test  and 
Inspection  Marking 
of  Shells 


Special  Champion 
Holders    concave   on 
face      for      marking 
sides  of  shells. 


tin 


Special  Holder 
shown,  with  the  type 
chamber  curved 
radially  for  markinsr 
the  base  of  shells. 
Small  illustration 
shows  style  of  type 
used    in   these    hold- 


For  Full  Particulars 

Write  Now 

For  This  Book 


Est.    1850 

Jas.  H,  Matthews 
&  Co. 

MARKING  DEVICES 

Forbes   Field 

Pittsburgh,  Pa. 


The   CANADIAN   FAIRBANKS-MORSE  CO..   Ltd., 

Montreal,  St.  John,  Toronto,  Winnipeg,  Calgary, 

^'ancouver,     Windsor,     Ottawa,     Quebec, 

Saskatoon,  Hamilton,  Victoria 

DISTRIBUTORS   FOR   CANADA 


Where  Accuracy 
is  a  Large  Factor 

the  choice  of  the  right  wheel  is  of 
vital  importance. 

An  exceedingly  accurate  job  is 
grinding  the  main  drive  gear 
stem,  made  of  steel — case-hard- 
ened. There  are  tu'o  diameters, 
one  J  575  and  the  other  1.125. 
The  larger  diameter  is  3  1-16 
long,  and  is  held  to  o.oooi  over 
size  and  0.0003  under  size.  The 
small  recess  at  the  center  is  not 
ground.  Stock  removed  is  0.0 10 
from  both  diameters.  In  spite  of 
these  close  limits  the  number  of 
pieces  produced  in  nine  hours  is 
265. 

A  \'ery  satisfactory  wheel  for  work 
of  this  kind  is  a  3824  combination 
K  or  L,  Alundum. 

Norton  Company 

Worcester,  Mass. 


The  Canadian  Fairbanks-Morse  Co.,  Limited 

Montreal       Toronto       Ottawa       St.  John.  N.B.      Winnipeg 

Cplgary         Saskatoon         Vancouver        Victoria 

F,  H.  Andrews  &  Son  -  .  Quebec,  Que. 

ELECTRIC  FURNACE  PLANTS 

Niagara  Falls.  N.Y.  M6  Chlppawa.  Ont..  Canada 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    M  A  C  H I N  E  R  Y 


39 


This  NORTON 

Grinding  Machine 

WorkswithinLimitsof  0.0001 ' 

Impossible?  No!  Somewhat  out  of  the 
ordinary  perhaps;  but  you  can  do  it.  too.  if 
you  require  work  within  that  Hmit. 

Of  course  the  machine,  a  Norton  16"  x  120", 
is  kept  in  the  pink  of  condition.  It  i.s  used 
for  rough  and  finish  grinding;  60  days  for 
seasoning  the  work  being  allowed  between 
the  operations.  The  .spindles  are  3%"  diam- 
eter by  8'  long:  0.005"  stock  is  left  for  the 
fini.sh  grind.  This  machine  is  owned  and 
operated  by  the  Lucas  Machine  Tool  Com- 
pany, Cleveland. 

For  acciu'acy  when  you  need  it;  production 
when  you  need  production  only :  and  the 
j)roper  proj)ortions  of  both  for  the  usual  run 
of  work — use  Norton  (hinding  Machines. 


NORTON  GRINDING  COMPANY 

WORCESTER,  MASSACHUSETTS,  U.S.A. 

Canadian  Salei  Agents: 

THE    CANADIAN    FAIRBANKS  -  MORSE    CO.,    Limited.   St.    John. 

Quebec.  Montreal.  Ottawa.  Toronto.  Hamilton.  Windsor,  Winnipeg. 

Saskatoon.  Calgary.  Vancouver.  Victoria 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,   consult   our   Buyers'   Directory   and   write   advertisers   listed    under   proper   heading. 


40 


CANADIAN    M  A  C  H 1 N  E  R  Y 


Volume  XVIII. 


c)j?^gIS 


Sft£PMS^^D<^ 


CANADA  5 

^  DEPARTMEMTAl  ^ 
HOUSE  FDR 

'    MECKANIUL    ' 
GOQQS     ' 


Manufacturing  Plant  Equipment 

8    RECEIVING,  ROUTING,  SHIPPING 


YOU'LL  FIND 
WHAT  YOU 
WANT  HEKE: 
Fairbanks     Scales, 

all    kinds 
Elevating    Trucks 
Electric      Transfer 

Trucks 
Electric    Elevating 

Trucks 
Electric   Tractor 

Trucks 
Hand  Trucks 
Box   Trucks 
Overhead    Cranes 
Trolleys 
Yale   Triplel 

Blocks 
Telfer    Systems 
Electric    Hoists 
Block   and   Tackle 
Portable   Cranes 


Gasoline   Trucks 
Redden    Truck 

Maker 
Industrial    Track 
Gasoline    Engines 
Dump  Cars 
Conveyors, 

all    kinds 
Elevators 
Conveyor  Scales, 

Continuous 

Weighing 
Pumps,    Pipe 
Valves    and 

Fittings 
Safes   and    Vai 
Watchman's 

Clocks 
Paper   Balers 
Packing   Tools 
Bolts,  Nots, 
Screws,  etc. 


Its 


Maximum  economy  of  production  can  only  be 
obtained  when  each  individual  item  which  enters 
into  production  is  raised  to  its  highest  efficiency. 

The  receiving,  stores,  handling  of  goods  and  ship- 
ping departments  require  equally  high-grade,  effi- 
cient equijiment  that  you  buy  for  your  production  of 
departments, 

Fairbanks  Direct  Reading  Scales,  Fairbanks- 
Morse  Elevating  Trucks,  Telfer  Systems,  etc.,  will 
help  you  materiall,v  to  secure  the  greatest  economy 
of  production. 

Let  us  quote  on  your  requirements. 

The  Canadian  Fairbanks-Morse 
Co.,  Limited 

Canada's  Departmental  House  for  Mechanical  Goods 

St.  John,  N.B.  Montreal         Quebec        Ottawa         Toronto         Hantiltoo 

Windsor         Winnipeg  Saskatoon  Calgary  Vancouver         Victoria 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consult   our  Buyers'  Directory  and  write  advertisers   listed  under  proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


Recent     Developments     in     Chucking     Appliances 

Staff  Article 

Quantity  production  on  an  efficiency  basis  is  dependent  upon  the  facilities  provided  for 
the  handling  of  the  product,  so  that  the  minimum  amount  of  time  is  consum.ed  between 
actual  machining  operation.  Special  efjort  has  been  centered  upon  the  design  and  construc- 
tion of  operating  appliances  for  the  rapid  and  economical  manufacture  of  all  classes  of  shells, 
and  some  observations  of  driving  appliances  form  the  basis  of  the  accompanying  article. 


IN  a  previous  issue  we  described  at 
some  length,  a  few  of  the  develop- 
ments that  have  taken  place  in  the 
adaptation  of  the  expanding  arbor  to 
to  the  manufacture  of  shells,  and  the  ad- 
vantages to  be  derived  by  cutting  down 
the  unproductive  factor  of  repetition 
production.  Where  articles  are  to  be 
made  im  large,  or  comparatively  large 
quantities,  it  is  very  desirable  if  not  ab- 
solutely necessary,  that  accessory  equip- 
ment such  as  special  chucks,  jigs  or  fix- 
tures, be  provided  to  handle  the  work 
more  accurately  and  rapidly,  and  conse- 
quently with  increased  efficiency  and 
economy.  What  was  true  in  the  case  of 
the  expanding  arbor  for  exterior  ma- 
chining, is  equally  true  in  the  develop- 
ment of  equipment,  either  as  special 
machines  or  attachments,  for  holding 
the  work  while  metal  is  being  removed 
from  the  bore.  While  the  expanding  ar- 
bor is  essentially  an  attachment  to  ma- 
chine tool  equipment,  and  offers  little 
opportunity  for  incorporation  in  special 
machinery  of  the  unit  type,  the  collet  or 
split  ring  compression  chuck  has  many 
features  that  provide  ideal  conditions 
for  the  single  purpose  machines;  so  much 
so,  that  the  developments  in  this  class  of 
equipment,  while  highly  desirable  for 
shell  making  purposes,  will  leave  an 
excess  of  "ornamental"  tools  on  the  mar- 
ket at  the  close  of  the  munitions  activity. 
It  is  very  unlikely  that  any  line  of  do- 
mestic enterprise  will  attain  the  magni- 
tude of  recent  shell  making,  and  there 
will  be  little  need  for  the  bulk  of  the  ex- 
isting equipment  of  a  special  character, 
but  the  varied  experience  of  the  past 
three  years  may  enable  the  different  en- 
gineers to  adapt  many  of  the  designs  to 
a  wider  use  in  ordinary  machine  shop 
practice. 


The  adapter  is  first  held  in  an  indepen- 
dent jaw  chuck  and  the  large  diameter 
turned  to  fit  the  recess  in  the  solid  chuck 
B;  the  diameter  of  this  recess  corres- 
ponding to  that  of  the  counterbore  of  the 
shell  base.  After  fac- 
ing the  back,  the 
adapter  is  placed  in 
chuck  and  secured  by 
the  cap  screws  C,  holes 
having  been  previously 
drilled  and  tapped  in 
the  proper  position. 
This  method  is  very 
satisfactory  for  mach- 
ining, but  has  the  dis- 
advantage that  con- 
siderable time  is  re- 
quired for  placing  in 
and  removing  the  work 
from  position;  this 
being  the  chief  reason 
against  its  general 
adoption. 

The  chuck  shown  in 
Fig.  2  does  not  offer 
any  better  machining 
facilities  than  that  of 
Fig.  1,  but  has  the  dis- 
tinct advantage  of 
rapid  operation,  a  fea- 
ture that  is  all  essential  in  this  particular 
class  of  work.  It  will  be  seen  from  its 
construction  that  it  is  a  unit  in  itself  and 
with  a  few  modifications  could  be  readily 
adapted  for  certain  classes  of  general 
chucking  work.  In  the  design  here 
shown,  the  steel  piece  B  was  shrunk  on 
the  end  of  the  lathe  spindle  A,  but  for 
ordinary  purposes  these  could  be  made 
of  one  piece  and  secured  to  the  spindle 
or  face-plate  by  any  convenient  method. 
The  steel  bush  C,  that  controls  the  radial 


insure  the  pawls   entering  their  respec- 
tive notches. 

Shell  Chucks 
During  the  incipient  stages   of  muni- 
tions  manufacture,   considerable   experi- 


>^y 


FIG. 


FIG.   1.    PLAIN   FACE  PLATE  CHUCK  FOR  ADAPTERS. 


Chucks  for  Adapters 
Before  going  into  the  chucks  that  have 
been  developed  for  the  shells  proper, 
we  will  just  touch  on  two  that  have 
done  effective  work  on  the  large  size 
adapters.  Fig  1  illustrates  a  plain  solid 
face-plate   chuck  for  finishing  adapters. 


movement  of  the  sectional  ring  I,  is 
threaded  to  the  piece  B.  Fitted  to  the 
outer  diameter  of  the  bush  G,  is  the 
hand  wheel  D,  cored  out  to  receive  the 
two  pawls,  F  and  F,;  the  former  being 
the  releasing  and  the  latter  the  tighten- 
ing pawl,  the  springs  being  provided  to 


KNOCK    PAWL   RING   CHUCK   FOR    ADAPTERS. 


menting  was  necessary  before  equipping 
the  various  machines  with  such  attach- 
ments as  are  now  in  general  practice. 
Before  shell  making  could  be  proceeded 
with  in  any  large  quantities,  it  was  very 
essential  that  the  different  machining 
operations  be  given  a  try-out  on  a  few 
shells  so  that  some  basis  could  be  ar- 
rived at  for  series  production.  The 
chuck  illustrated  in  Fig  3  is  one  that  was 
designed  primarily  for  experimental 
work,  but  several  of  these  are  still  in  ac- 
tive service.  The  greater  number  of  the 
machines  in  the  plant  where  these 
chucks  are  used,  were  of  the  standard 
type  of  engine  lathe,  and  owing  to  the 
fact  that  the  firm  was  one  of  the  first  to 
engage  in  the  industry,much  of  the  auxil- 
iary equipment  was  of  home-made  de- 
sign and  construction.  In  the  plain  pot 
chuck  shown,  B  is  the  portion  bolted  to  a 
special  face  plate  on  the  lathe.  The  out- 
er portion  of  the  body  is  turned  in  posi- 
tion and  is  afterwards  supported  by  a 
steady  head  located  between  the  clamp- 
ing screws;  these  are  six  in  number, 
four  at  D  being  set  permanently  to  a 
certain  position  for  a  forging  or  rough 
turned  shell,  the  two  screws  E-E  being 
used  for  locking  the  shell  in  the  chuck. 
When  facing  the  base  end  the  gage  rod 
C  is  secured  centrally  to  the  rear  end  of 
the  chuck. 

A  knock  pawl  type  of  split  ring  chuck 
designed  for   gripping  the   base   end   of 


264 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volu.-tie  XVIII. 


the  shrapnel  shells,  is  shown  in  Fig  4. 
This  is  of  the  unit  design;  that  is,  it  caii 
be  removed  from  itsi  position  without  dis- 
mantling any  of  the  parts.     The  central 


degrees  apart.  The  hand  wheel  D  is 
locked  to  the  cage  ring  by  the  tapered 
key  F.  The  jaws,  as  illustrated,  have 
teeth     for     gripping     the  forging,     but 


FIG.   3.    PLAIN   POT  CHUCK. 


portion  A,  that  carries  the  chuck  proper, 
is  made  with  a  shank  that  fits  into  the 
nose  of  the  hollow  spindle  B.  Fitted  to 
the  outer  diameter  of  A  is  the  steel  bush 
C,  that  controls  the  radial  movement  of 
the  hardened  steel  split  ring  D,  the  ring 
spring  keeping  the  sections  in  contact 
with  the  conical  bearing.  On  the  outer 
surface  of  the  piece  C,  the  operating 
hand  wheel  E,  is  fitted  freely  and  lock- 
ed in  a  lateral  position  by  means  of  the 
ring  H;  this  ring  is  of  the  piston  type 
and  sprung  over  the  shoulder  shown. 
The  pawl  G  is  fitted  in  the  body  of  the 
hand  wheel  and  operates  the  ring  C  by 
its  action  against  the  notch  shown.  To 
prevent  the  fixture  from  turning  in  the 
spindle,  the  pin  I  is  driven  in  the  shank 
and  locks  the  same  in  slot  J.  An  inter- 
esting feature  of  these  chucks,  especial- 
ly on  light  work,  is  their  semi-automa- 
tic action;  as  the  shell  can  be  placed  in 
the  chuck  so  that  the  starting  of  the 
machine  causes  the  inertia  of  the 
heavy  hand  wheel  to  close  the  chuck,  and 
when  stopping  the  opposite  effect  takes 
place,  as  the  momentum  of  the  wheel  is 
sufficient  to  release  the  chuck  when  hand 
or  mechanical  friction  is  applied  to  the 
shell  or  the  cone  pulleys. 

A  special  compression  chuck  having 
the  controlling  hand  wheel  fixed  to  the 
operating  cam,  is  illustrated  in  Fig.  5. 
In   this   device,   the   body   or   containing 


where  a  turned  shell  is  being  held, 
these  can  be  replaced  by  others  having 
smooth  surfaces. 

The  heavy  collet  chuck  shown  in  Fig. 
7  is  somewhat  cumbersome,  but  very  ef- 
ficient. The  main  casing  of  the  chuck 
is  a  large  casting  cored  out  as  shown  in 


ly  secured  to  a  central  position  by  means 
of  the  screws  F,  two  retaining  screws 
being  used  in  the  top  block  to  prevent 
the  same  from  falling  out  of  position 
when  assembling  the  head.  The  three 
blocks  H  that  control  the  radial  move- 
ment of  the  jaws  J,  are  secured  to  the 
centre  spider  of  the  head  by  the  screws 
shown.  The  gripping  jaws  are  relieved 
in  the  centre  as  shown  at  K,  to  provide 
a  better  means  of  holding  the  shell.  The 
forked  collar  L  which  is  connected  to  the 
draw  rod  M,  engages  with  the  offset  on 
the  end  of  the  three  jaws.  The  operation 
of  the  device  can  either  be  obtained  by 
hand  wheel  or  pneumatic  appliance, 
suitably  located  at  the  rear  of  the  lathe 
spindle.  No  springs  are  required  to  con- 
trol the  release  of  jaws  after  the  pres- 
sure has  been  removed,  as  the  jaws  are 
positively  controlled  in  a  radial  direction 
by  the  dove-tailed  connection  shown. 
Chucking  Shells  for  Thread  Milling 
Some  interesting  attachments  have 
been  developed  for  regulating  the  lead 
of  the  chuck  and  likewise  the  shell,  while 
the  threads  are  being  milled  in  the  base 
or  the  nose.     Owing  to  the  nature  of  the 


FIG.  4.    KNOCK  PAWL  RING  CHUCK   WITH  SHORT  GRIP. 


order  to  provide  lightness  with  size.  The 
easing  A  is  secured  direct  to  the  nose 
of  the  spindle  and  locked  in  a  permanent 
position  by  means  of  the  key  C,  the  front 
end  of  the  chuck  being  supported  in  the 


machining  operation,  it  is  necessary  to 
advance  either  the  work  or  the  milling 
cutter  while  the  thread  is  being  cut.  A 
general  arrangement  of  one  of  these  de- 
vices showing  the  chuck  and  also  the  op- 
erating mechanism  is  illustrated  in  Fig. 
While  the  attachment  shown  is  not 
directly    a    chucking    proposition,    a    de- 


FIG.  5.    CAM   OPERATED   CHUCK. 


ring  A  is  bolted  to  the  face  plate  and  en- 
closes the  cage  B  that  retains  the  three 
jaws  C  in  their  respective  positions,  120 


steady  rest  D;  this  support  is  secured  to 
the  lathe  bed  and  is  fitted  with  three 
adjustable  blocks  E  that  can  be  accurate- 


scription  of  its  construction  and  opera- 
tion may  be  of  considerable  interest. 
The  machining  of  the  base  is  entirely  ac- 


September  6,  1917 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


255 


complished  by  the  milling  process,  the 
spindle  and  the  shell  being  revolved  at  a 
constant  speed  by  means  of  a  train  of 
gears.  The  pulley  A,  which  is  driven 
from  an  overhead  shaft,  is  keyed  to  a 
worm  shaft,  the  worm  of  which  is  held 
in   the  casing  B,  and  engages  with   Che 


the  arm  W,  one  end  carrying  the  two 
pawls  X  and  Y,  the  other  provided  with 
a  handle  for  returning  to  the  initial  posi- 
tion. The  pocket  Z  contains  the  spring 
that  keeps  the  pawls  to  their  respective 
positions,  these  being  set  by  the  handle 
A,.     The  ratchet  wheel   B,  is  keyed  to 


FIG.  7.  HEAVY  COLLET  CHUCK  FOR  NOSE  OPERATION. 


worm  wheel  C,  the  latter  being  secured 
to  the  shaft  of  which  D  is  an  integral 
pinion;  this  pinion  engages  the  interme- 
diate gear  E,  which  in  turn  drives  the 
main  spindle  in  the  centre  of  which  the 
gear  G  forms  an  integral  part.  Secured 
to  the  forward  portion  of  the  spindle  is 
the  chuck  support  I,  upon  which  is 
mounted  the  chuck  mechanism.  The 
ring  J  that  controls  the  split  ring  K,  is 
operated  by  tightening  and  releasing 
pawls  located  in  the  web  of  the  hand 
wheel  L.  When  in  a  working  position, 
the  inner  or  nose  end  of  the  shell  is 
centrally  supported  on  the  bush  O,  fitted 
to  the  stud  P,  that  is  threaded  to  the  rear 
spindle  C^  which  is  firmly  pinned  to  the 


back  support  of  the  main  spindle.  The 
idea  of  the  bush  0  is  to  accommodate 
the  two  different  sizes  of  nose  threads. 
The  mechanism  that  controls  the  ad- 
vance of  the  work  is  shown  to  the  ex- 
treme left  of  the  cut.  Fitted  to  the  rear 
housing  is  the  bracket  T  that  supports 
the  lateral  feed  shaft  Q,  and  the  oper- 
ating gearing.  The  ratchet  wheel  U  is 
bolted  to  the  bracket  T,  and  always  re- 
mains stationary  in  relation  to  the  ma- 
chine   frame.      Bolted    to    the    nut   V    is 


the  end  of  the  shaft  Q,  the  threaded 
portion  C,  fitting  the  nut  V,  which  is  of 
the  same  pitch  as  the  thread  to  be  cut. 
When  the  counterbore  and  recess  are  be- 
ing milled,  the  pawl  Y  is  engaged  with 
the  wheel  B^  causing  the  shaft  and  the 
nut  to  revolve  together,  with  no  lateral 
movement  in  shell  position. 

After  the  base  is  prepared  for  the 
thread,  and  the  thread  milling  cutter 
brought  into  working  position,  the 
handle  A,  is  moved  to  disengage  paw]  Y 
and  eng^e  pawl  X  with  wheel  U;  this 
keeps  the  arm  W  and  the  nut  Y  station- 
ary, resulting  in  the  shaft  Q  revolving  in 
the  nut.  thus  slowly  drawing  the  spindle 
and  shell  backwards  equal  to  the  pitch 
on  the  thread  C^  during  the  milling  of 
the  work  thread.  On  this  particular  ma- 
chine a  warning  bell  is  attached  to  warn 
the  operator  of  too  much  over  travel  of 
the  mechanism. 

@ 

PRECAUTIONS   IN   PICRIC  ACID 
WORKS 

IN  the  hospital  attached  to  the  works  of 
the  New  England  Manufacturing"  Co., 
Woburn,  Mass.,  the  following  routine 
treatment  is  carried  out  in  all  cases  of 
gassing-  with  nitric  fumes,  and  it  has 
given  so  far  the  best  results.  Foremen 
are  instructed  to  send  their  men  at  once 
to  the  hospital  even  in  the  slightest  case 
of  gassing.  The  patient  is  then  at  once 
treated  by  the  inhalation  of  ammonia, 
by  means  of  a  modified  lung  motor,  the 
air  used  being-  passed  over  aromatic 
spirit  of  ammonia.  This  air  may,  if  need- 
ful, be  forced  into  the'  lungs  without 
causing  a  great  deal  of  inconvenience  to 
the  patient — the  relief  given  being  im- 
mediate. When  cough  and  substernal 
distress  are  relieved,  the  jjatient  is  kept 
under  observation;  sal  volatile  and  oc- 
casional inhalation  of  smelling  salts  is 
the  treatment,  with  the  saline  purgative. 
Bed  treatment  is  insisted  upon  in  all 
severe  cases.  No  deaths  have  been  re- 
corded out  of  398  cases  treated,  although 


twenty-nine  were  serious.  Acid  burns  in 
the  eye  are  treated  with  prompt  first- 
aid  washing  with  lime  water.  At  the 
hospital  the  eye  is  irrigated  with  16  oz. 
of  lime  water  and  then  with  warm  boric 
acid  solution.  Hot  compresses  of  boric 
acid  are  applied  until  the  inflammation 
subsides.  After  this  treatment  only  one 
case  of  permanent  injury  to  sight  has 
been  recorded. 

^ 

WELDED  SHIPS 
By  T.  J. 
WELDING  cast  steel  sections  together 
into  ships  is  one  of  the  latest  proposi- 
tions for  speeding  up  shipbuilding. 
Briefly  the  idea  is  to  build  a  hull  in  sec- 
tions, each  a  casting  as  large  as  the  con- 
ditions will  allow,  and  to  weld  the  cast- 
ings together  electrically  by  an  arc 
method.  One  casting  might  constitute 
the  bottom  of  the  vessel  for  a  section 
eight  feet  in  the  dimension  lengthwise  of 
the  ship;  another  casting  would  form 
practically  one  side  of  the  hull  for  that 
section,  and  a  third  the  corresponding 
side  opposite;  a  fourth  casting  would 
form  part  of  the  deck  framework  or  the 
stiffening  between  the  upper  parts  of  the 
sides.  The  scheme  is  thus  to  build  a 
large  number,  of  substantially  identical 
sections,  so  that  the  work  may  be  carried 
out  in  duplication  in  many  centres  and 
at  the  same  time  it  is  intended  to  afford 
a  means  of  adding  rapidly  to  shipbuild- 
ing capacity  without  depending  upon  the 
rolling  mills,  which  are  already  fully  en- 
gaged. Midship  sections  would,  of 
course,  be  duplicated  to  a  large  extent, 
and  then  for  the  corresponding  parts  of 
standardized  ships  the  identical  castings 
would  be  used. 

The  abutting  edges  of  eastings  would 
be  bevelled  to  form  the  V-shaped  grooves 
used  in  electric  welding,  and  by  means 
of  interlocking  lugs  and  overhanging 
ends  the  cast  sections  would  be  drawn 
together  to  bring  the  edges  into  exact 
registration,  to  be  welded  electrically. 
In  the  size  of  the  castings  section  8  ft. 
by  30ft.  might  be  used  or  even  larger  if 
the  plant  permitted  it.  The  grooves  are 
on  the  inside  of  the  hull,  leaving  the 
outside  of  the  ship  without  projections 
other  than  the  minute  ones  correspond- 
ing to  the  surface  of  a  steel  casting  un- 
touched from  the  sand.  The  only  work 
contemplated  necessary  on  the  outside 
would  be  the  removal  of  chipping  of  thei 
steel  fins  following  the  use  of  built-up 
forms  of  mould,  which  may  be  used  for 
the  large  castings. 

The  inner  gkins  of  the  vessel  to  form 
bulkheads,  ranks  and  bunkers,  may  be 
composed  of  rolled-sheet  metal  welded  to 
the  decks,  beams,  frames  and  plating. 
There  would  be  the  necessity  in  this  type 
of  construction  for  the  castings  to  be  re- 
inforced to  secure  strength  to  the  hill 
itself  as  well  as  to  provide  for  satisfac- 
tory casting  results.  On  a  close  examina- 
tion of  this  method  it  cannot  be  said  that 
there  is  a  gTeat  likelihood  of  its  having 
much  success,  as  the  work  involved 
might  very  possibly  be  lengthened 
through  broken  castings,  and  riveting  by 
pneumatic  power  is  not  yet  out  of  d-^te 
or  superseded  by  any  more  succes;'ul 
method. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


AN  EARLY  STEAMBOAT 

THE  present  advanced  state  of  marine 
engineering  causes  peculiar  interest  to 
attach  to  the  accompanying  illustration 
of  a  design  for  a  steamboat  by  John  U. 
Rastrick,  who  built  engines  for  Richard 
Trevithick  in  the  beginning  of  :he  19th 
century.  The  illustration,  3igned  by 
John  U.  Rastrick,  March  27,  1813,  Bridg- 
north, is  reproduced  by  courtesy  of  our 
contemporary  The  Engineer  ivhich  pub- 
lishes the  following  letter  from  the  owti- 
er,  Arthur  L.  Johnson,  Limited,  of 
Middlesborough,  England,  who  wrote:  "I 
picked  up  at  a  country  book-shop  the 
large  folio  volume  of  plates  to  Tred- 
gold's  Works,  dated  1839,  London,  John 
Weale,  which  contained,  stuck  m  a  back 
page,  a  drawing  which  jnust  surely  be 
of  interest  to  all  engineer-,  as  it  is 
signed  by  John  U.  Rastrick,  March  27, 
1813,  Bridgnorth,  and  is  a  plan,  sectional 
elevation  and  end  elevation  of  a  design 
for  a  steamboat.  The  engine  is  set  in 
the  end  of  the  boiler,  and  is  high-pres- 
sure, and  directly  connected  to  the  crank 
shaft,   on  which  are  mounted   a   pair  of 


in  the  paddles  will  be  observed.  The 
whole  thing  is  excellent  in  its  simplicity 
and  directness  of  purpose." 

"We  are  quite  unable  to  say  whether 
this  "ship,"  as  Mr.  Johnson  calls  it, 
though  pinnace  is  probably  a  better 
name,  was  ever  constructed,  and  if  any 
of  our  readers  can  give  any  clue  to  it, 
we  engineers  would  be  greatly  indebted 
to  them.  Trevithick,  as  readers  of  his 
"Life"  know,  was  deeply  interested  in 
steamboats,  and  in  Vol.  I,  page  352  of 
his  "Life,"  a  letter  by  him  to  Hazeldine, 
Rastrick  and  Co.,  Bridgnorth,  dated 
November  13,  181.5,  Penzance,  may  be 
found.  In  it  he  says,  "Enclosed  you 
have  a  drawing  for  the  towing  engine 
for  London,  which  you  will  execute  as 
soon  as  possible."  It  is  clear  from  the 
context  that  the  engine  in  question  was 
meant  to  drive  a  screw  propeller,  so  that 
even  if  it  were  not  two  years  later  than 
the  Rastrick  drawing,  it  would  be  ob- 
vious that  the  same  vessel  is  not  refer- 
red to." 

"It  may  be  of  interest  to  recall  that 
Fulton's   steamboat,  the   Clermont,   was 


llKi«.''.*-«.».»«t 


EARLY  DRAWING  OK  STEAMBOAT  DESIGNED  BY  JOHN  U.   RASTRICK  IN    1813. 


paddle-wheels.  The  workmanship  of  the 
draughtsman  is  admirable,  and  the  shad- 
ing would  probably  not  be  worth  the 
trouble  to-day.  The  picture  i.i  of  inter- 
est, as  Rastrick  was  the  founder  who 
built  the  engines  of  Richard  Trevithick, 
and  it  would  please  me  to  know  ;f  Trevi- 
thick ever  had  such  a  ship  onstructed, 
and  if  he  planned  it  himself.  The  scale 
of  the  drawing  is  %-in.  to  a  foot,  and 
the  ship  was  intended  to  be  about  40  ft. 
long,  11  ft.  6  in.  beam,  and  5  ft.  6  in. 
draught." 

Commenting  on  the  picture  our  con- 
temporary says:  "Simple  as  it  is,  it  is 
an  extraordinarily  interesting  link  in  the 
history  of  steam  navigation.  The  Trevi- 
thick influence  is  obvious.  The  engine  is 
a  high-pressure  one — there  s  no  con- 
denser— and  all  the  complication  of  side- 
levers  or  overhead  beamg  is  avoided. 
The  whole  design  is  as  direct  and  sim- 
ple as  could  be  desired.  The  cylinder 
is  apparently  single  acting,  and  we 
gather  that  a  trunk  piston,  with  the 
connecting-rod  coupled  In  s  gudgeon 
pin,  was  proposed.  It  is  almost  buried 
ia  the  domed  end  of  boiler,  which  has  a 
fire-flue  at  one  side  and  a  return  flue  at 
i'-'-a   other.     The   counterbalance   weights 


completed  in  1807,  and  that  John  Robert- 
son's "Comet"  was  built  in  1812.  Hence 
Rastrick — or  Trevithick — could  not  be 
regarded  as  a  pioneer;  but  it  must,  at 
the  same  time,  be  admitted  that  the  sim- 
plicity of  the  design,  and  the  obvious 
intention  to  use  high-pressure  steam, 
are  matters  of  the  highest  interest." 

@ 

SOME  NEW  AND  GROWING  BRITISH 
INDUSTRIES 

By  Mark  Meredith. 
SINCE  the  struggle  between  Britain  and 
Germany  for  military  supremacy  began, 
British  industrial  concerns  have  been  by 
no  means  idle,  and  quite  a  number  of 
new  industries  have  been  started,  and 
there  is  very  reason  to  hope  that  they 
will  continue  long  after  the  clash  of  arms 
has  ceased.  One  of  the  most  important 
steps  in  the  struggle  for  wresting  the 
stipremacy  from  Germany  in  many  im- 
portant trades  was  the  exhibition  of  Aus- 
trian and  German  goods  exhibited  in  the 
Midlands,  for  at  this  collection  of 
samples  it  was  possible  for  manufac- 
turers to  examine  and  handle  the  actual 
products  of  the  central  empires.  It  is 
no  use  laying  down  rules  and  regulations 


and  giving  all  manner  of  hints  to  a 
manufacturer,  for  he  wants  to  see  the 
actual  article  and  take  it  to  pieces  and 
reconstruct  it  his  own  way.  Until  he  has 
done  that  he  has  not  much  knowledge. 

Municipal  Encouragement 

One  immediate  outcome  of  the  Exhibi- 
tion held  under  the  auspices  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  was  that  the  Chambers  of  Com- 
merce of  Birmingham  and  Wolverhamp- 
ton adopted  a  forward  policy  and  a 
scheme  involving  research  work  has  been 
inaugurated,  and  several  municipalities 
and  local  authorities  have  set  themselves 
the  task  of  attracting  new  industries 
within  their  borders.  A  new  factory  will 
shortly  be  completed  at  Wolverhampton 
for  the  manufacture  on  a  large  scale  of 
wrought  enamelled  hollowware,  and  a 
factory  is  to  be  built  within  the  borough 
for  the  manufacture  of  artificial  silk.  In 
another  part  of  the  Midlands  a  brush- 
making  machine,  made  formerly  in  Ger- 
many, is  being  manufactured,  and  a  wel- 
come stimulus  has  been  given  to  the 
flint-glass  industry  and  other  depart- 
ments of  the  glass  trade.  Considerable 
developments  have  been  made  in  the 
Sheffield  district  with  the  heavy  steel  in- 
dustry, and  electrically  melted  steel  is 
likely  to  play  an  important  part  in  the 
future  struggle  for  industrial  supremacy. 
At  the  present  moment  a  large  number 
of  electric  furnaces  are  in  use  and  are 
used  chiefly  for  the  production  of  alloy 
steels  for  constructional  purposes,  and  to 
an  increasing  extent  they  are  replacing 
the  crucible  for  carbon  and  high-speed 
tool  steel.  For  a  number  of  purposes 
electrically  melted  steel  is  proving  an 
efficient  substitute  for  the  scarce  and 
more  expensive  Swedish  brands. 

The  war  produced  a  boom  in  high- 
speed tool  steel  which  would  appal  the 
imagination  if  the  figures  relating  to  the 
value  of  the  material  produced  and  sold 
could  be  given.  Every  crucible  furnace 
in  Sheffield  has  been  given  up  to  its 
manufacture,  and  there  has  been  no 
pause  in  the  consumption  or  the  demand. 
Yet  at  the  beginning  of  the  war  the  steel 
trade  had  no  source  for  the  supplies  of 
tungsten  metal,  without  which  high- 
speed steel  cannot  be  made — than  Ger- 
many. It  was  no  light  task  to  set  about 
creating  a  home  supply,  as  the  making 
of  tungsten  involves  intricate  chemical 
processes,  accompanied  by  much  patient 
research  and  experiment,  and  it  must  be 
taken  into  account  that  the  German 
makers  had  passed  the  experimental 
stage  years  ago.  Here  again  Britain  rose 
triumphantly  to  the  occasion,  and  at  the 
present  time  there  is  an  ample  supply 
for  home  needs  and  for  export  as  well. 
At  least  half  of  the  ores  are  found  in  the 
British  Dominions  and  the  whole  of  this 
will  doubtless  be  reserved  in  the  future 
for  British  makers. 

Dyes  and  Optical  Goods 

Again,  in  the  dye  industry  great  pro- 
gress has  been  made  and  the  British 
chemist  has  succeeded  in  producing  what 
is  known  as  indanthrene  blue,  a  dye  which 
the  Germans  declared  could  never  be  pro- 
duced by  any  one  but  themselves;  but  not 
only  has  the  firm  of  British  Dyes,  Ltd 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


237 


Pioductd  this  useful  color,  but  a  Carlisle 
...  ai  nas  done  so  as  well. 

Users  oi  gelatine  in  sheets  were  often 
of  the  opinion  that  laermany  waS'  tne 
only  source  of  supply  lor  this,  but  tor 
many  years  a  eeliast  nrm  has  made 
sheet  gelatine,  and  in  addition  made 
great  use  of  it  for  enamelling  and  im- 
parting a  washaDle  suriace  to  show- 
cards. 

Although  German  opticians  have  ob- 
tained a  high  reputation  for  their  goods, 
and  this  reputation  has  been  consider- 
ably helped  oy  the  fact  that  photograph- 
ers and  others  thought  that  a  lens  of 
German  design  and  make  was  ipso  facto 
better  than  anything  which  the  British 
optician  could  turn  out — actually  that 
belief,  as  the  more  expert  photographers 
know,  will  not  bear  examination.  The 
two  factors  which  determine  the  quality 
of  a  photographic  lens  are:  first,  its  op- 
tical formula,  and  second,  the  perfection 
of  workmanship  by  which  the  curves, 
etc.,  prescribed  in  the  scientific  formula 
are  given  to  the  separate  glasses  and 
the  latter  polished  and  centred  in  their 
metal  mounts.  It  was  a  British  optician, 
Mr.  H.  Dennis  Taylor,  who  in  the  early 
'nineties  of  last  century  first  showed  in 
the  "Cooke"  lenses  that  the  very  highest 
optical  qualities  could  be  obtained  with 
v^ery  simple  glasses  by  means  of  suitable 
air  spaces  between  them,  a  principle 
which  the  Germans,  in  common  with  op- 
ticians in  other  countries,  adopted,  with 
variation.  In  workmanship,  too,  official 
tests  in  Great  Britain  by  the  National 
Physical  Laboratory,  constantly  made  in 
pre-war  days,  have  shown  that  of  two 
lenses  made  according  to  the  same  Ger- 
man formula,  one  in  Germany  by  the 
parent  firm  and  the  other  in  London  by 
the  workmen  of  a  licensee,  the  British- 
made  objective  was  optically  the  better 
of  the  two.  Again,  the  British  have  suc- 
ceeded in  evolving  an  improved  type  of 
lens  for  the  special  work  of  photograph- 
ing from  aircraft,  which  has  enabled  ob- 
servers of  the  Royal  Flying  Corps  to  ob- 
tain photographs  which  were  superior  to 
any  work  which  the  Germans  could  ex- 
ecute. 

^ 

THE     ENGINEERING     COUNCIL     OF 

AMERICAN    ENGINEERING 

SOCIETIES 

THE  formation  of  Engineering  Council 
is  the  outgrowth  of  a  real  need  for  pro- 
per consideration  of  questions  of  gen- 
eral interest  to  engineers  and  to  the 
public,  and  to  provide  the  means  for 
tinited  action  upon  questions  of  common 
concern.  Many  such  questions  have 
come  up  in  the  past  and  will  arise  in 
greater  number  in  the  future.  This  war 
has  brought  out  very  impressively  the 
actual  need  for  united  action  of  some 
Icind.  At  prfesent  the  Council  is  con- 
cerned only  with  four  societies  because 
that  seemed  the  most  practical  way  of 
getting  a  group  of  men  together  to 
answer  the  immediate  needs,  but  these 
societies  do  not  assume  to  speak  for  all 
engineering  societies  in  the  country. 
Criticism  that  they  are  exclusive  in  any 
■way   is   utterly  mistaken.     There   is   the 


hope  that  such  a  council  by  proving  iU 
self  effectively  may  lead  to  much  wider 
co-operation  in  a  strictly  representative 
body  for  all  engineers,  and  thus  pave 
the  way  for  a  very  much  larger  union 
in   the  future. 

How  can  the  council  be  enlarged?  By 
a  union  of  all  societies  either  as  the  out- 
growth of  the  present  council  or  by  a 
congress  of  engineers  leading  to  united 
action  by  all  societies.  The  first  method, 
will  be  the  most  natural  one  because 
many  local  societies  and  national  so- 
cieties also  have  a  large  membership 
in  the  four  societies  at  present  concern- 
ed. We  have  three  classes  of  engineers 
to  reach:  first,  those  who  are  members 
of  local  societies  and  not  members  of 
national  societies;  second,  those  who  are 
members  of  national  societies  and  not 
members  of  local  societies;  and  third, 
those  who  are  members  of  no  society. 
The  last  named  class  constitutes  a  very 
Jarge  number  in  our  profession.  We 
are  almost  as  mixed  as  American  citiz- 
enship and  we  suffer  therefrom  just  as 
much  as  America  with  a  population  re- 
presenting every  race  and  every  people 
in  Europe.  There  can  be  no  question  of 
the  enormous  advantage  of  union.  That 
union  should  be  completed  by  strength- 
ening the  existing  agencies  and  not  by 
the  formation  of  new  societies.  The 
national  societies  are  thoroughly  na- 
tional notwithstanding  an  occasional 
complaint  that  they  are  run  by  New- 
York.  If  they  have  not  been  able  to  ex- 
press the  democratic  spirit  of  our  coun- 
try as  ^ully  as  might  be  desired  it  is 
the  fault  of  the  members  in  all  the 
states  and  not  of  the  city  in  which  the 
principal    offices    are   located. 

The  four  societies  concerned  at  pre- 
sent are  the  American  Society  of  Civil 
Engineers,  the  American  Institute  of 
Mining  Engineers,  the  American  Society 
of  Mechanical  Engineers  and  the  Amer- 
ican Institute  of  Electrical  Engineers. 
They  have  come  together  in  pairs  from 
time  to  time  in  the  past  for  special  pur- 
poses and  there  have  been  general  con- 
ferences on  subjects  requiring  immedi- 
ate settlement,  but  until  the  council  was 
definitely  organized  in  June  there  was 
no  permanent  body  to  advise  all  the 
societies.  We  have  had  many  fruitful 
discussions  in  the  past  leading  to  use- 
ful action.  The  Standardization  Com- 
mittee which  has  been  organized  to  re- 
present five  societies  has  passed  upon 
commercial  standards  of  all  kinds.  This 
committee  has  great  possibilities  and  it 
should  be  enlarged  enough  so  that  its 
influence  may  become  very  widespread. 
Many  problems  have  already  been 
presented  before  the  council.  Its  per- 
sonal made  up  of  twenty-four  men  re- 
presenting equally  the  four  societies  is 
well  balanced  and  judicial.  The  first 
duty  was  necessarily  the  organization 
and  appointment  of  standing  committees 
(Which  have  already  been  reported  in 
the    press. 

Certain  questions  relate,  however,  to 
the  war  and  the  assistance  that  engi- 
neers  can   render.     A   coimnittee  to   be 


called  the  American  Engineering  Ser- 
vice Committee  was  appointed  with  in- 
structions to  invite  the  co-operation  of 
all  engineering  societies.  Its  present 
duty  is  the  tabulation  and  listing  of  the 
members  of  the  five  societies  represent- 
ed, in  order  that  we  as  a  profession  may 
be  in  a  position  to  take  a  larger  part  in 
the  industries  after  peace  is  declared. 
This  tabulation  has  already  in  port  been 
done,  but  in  a  rather  unsystematic  and 
unequal  way.  It  is  hoped  that  the  new 
committee  by  having  additions  from 
other  societies  may  make  a  final  and 
lasting  tabulation  of  all  the  engineers  in 
the  United  States.  The  list  is  to  be 
kept  in  the  Engineering  Building  for 
general  use  in  Government  problems 
and  in  the  industries.  At  present  the 
committee  is  devoting  its  attention  to 
the  immediate  need  of  the  hour,  name- 
ly, the  procurement  of  men  for  special 
service  in  the  Government.  A  list  of 
specialists  in  the  societies  has  already 
been  completed.  There  are  three  meth- 
ods by  which  engineers  mav  enter  Unit- 
ed States  Service:  first,  through  some 
organization;  second,  through  individ- 
ual application  to  a  department  of  the 
Government;  and  third,  through  selec- 
tion by  the  Conscription  Law.  But  this 
is  War  Service  wholly  and  not  Civil 
Service  which  is  the  same  now  as  it  has 
always*  been.  As  a  matter  of  fact  a 
great  many  engineers  have  aVeady  en- 
tered through  the  engineering  societies, 
throup-h  colleges  and  through  various 
special  boards  in  Washington. 

Another  committee  is  called  the  War 
Committee  of  Technical  Societies.  It 
was  appointed  to  assist  any  organization 
in  Washington,  such  as  for  instance,  the 
Council  of  National  Defense,  the  Na- 
tional Research  Council  and  the  Naval 
Consulting  Board,  in  any  wav  in  which 
it  can  bring  to  the  attention  of  the 
engineers  of  the  country  the  necessity 
for  thought  and  help  in  the  numerous 
problems  that  arise. 

A  council  organized  by  the  enlarge- 
ment of  the  present  Engineering  Coun- 
cil can  be  very  effective  in  manv  ways, 
without  interfering  with  the  autonomy 
of  anv  individual  society.  Every  so- 
ciety has  some  definite  purpose  of  its 
own  and  also  some  which  it  holds  in 
common  with  all  other  societies.  One 
of  the  latter  purposes  relates  to  public 
service  and  to  co-operation.  To  the  end 
that  all  societies  may  understand  full 
their  opportunity,  communications  will 
be  sent  out  inviting  co-operation  and 
it  is  hoped  that  the  council  may  be  suc- 
cessful in  ai-ousing  sufficient  interest  to 
bring  about  a  larger  and  better  council 
for   all   engineers. 

In  organising  the  council  provision 
was  made  for  the  election  to  member- 
ship of  other  national  engineering  and 
technical  societies.  There  is  no  doubt 
that  rules  can  be  made  which  these  so- 
cieties may  become  members.  This  will 
involve  consultation  and  discussion  in 
the  future.  The  office  of  the  council 
will  be  in  the  Engineering  Building,  29 
West  39th  Street,  New  York  City. 


258 


Volume  XVIII. 


PROCESSES   IN  MANUFACTURE 

Inventive  Genius  and    Research  Operate  to  a  Dual  End  —  They  Aim  to  Improve 
What  We  Now  Possess  and  Bring  to  Our  Service  Commodities  Before  Unknown 


WELDING    WITH    APPLICATION    TO 
AUTOMOBILE  ENGINEERING 

By  Herbert  L.  Towns. 

THE  evolution  of  the  methods  em- 
ployed by  manufacturers  in  the  in- 
dustrial world  is  undoubtedly  a 
source  of  wonder,  and  probably  one  of  the 
greatest  advances  is  that  of  welding. 
Along  with  welding  has  come  the  cutting 
of  metals  by  the  application  of  heat,  and 
so  great  has  been  the  development  of 
these  means  of  manufacture,  that  the 
welding  and  cutting  apparatus  has  be- 
come an  ideal  and  absolute  necessity  to  the 
engineering  trade.  In  dealing  with  this 
subject  it  will  be  advisable  to  make  some 
classification,  and  the  best  method  to 
adopt  will  be  to  deal  with  the  process  of 
welding  in  a  general  sense,  and  then  con- 
sider the  possible  applications  to  automo- 
bile industry. 

Welding  is  the  process  of  joining  two 
pieces  of  metal  by  melting  the  adjacent 
edges  of  the  metal  together,  and  the 
methods  of  producing  the  necessary  heat 
have  varied;  among  them  are  the  oxy- 
hydrogen,  the  oxy-acetylene,  and  the  elec- 
tric arc  methods.  The  oxy-hydrogen 
flame  is  very  rarely,  if  ever,  used,  as  the 
heat  produced  by  this  flame  is  not  nearly 
so  intense  as  the  heat  produced  by  the 
oxy-acetylene  flame  or  the  electric  arc, 
and  as  the  oxy-acetylene  flame  is  more 
extensively  used,  it  will  be  as  well  to  con- 
fine all  consideration  to  this  method  in 
order  to  devote  the  limited  time  at  our 
disposal  to  a  single  subject: 

Oxy-acetylene  welding  is  classed  as  an 
autogenous  welding  process  in  which  two 
parts  of  the  same  metal,  or  different 
metals,  are  joined  by  the  melting  of  the 
adjacent  edges  of  the  two  parts  and 
causing  them  to  become  joined  without 
the  use  of  hammers  or  any  form  of  com- 
pression the  melting  of  the  edges  of  the 
pieces  of  metal  being  performed  by  the 
heat  produced  bv  an  oxv-ac(^ylene  flame. 
It  may  be  well  to  mention  that  the  term 
"autogenous  welding"  is  often  used  as 
being  the  method  of  welding  performed 
bv  the  heat  of  the  flame  produced  by  the 
combustion  of  a  mixture  of  gases,  but  the 
correct  meaning  of  "autogenous  welding" 
IS  the  joining  of  pieces  of  metal  without 
the  aid  of  any  foreign  material. 

The  oxy-acetvlene  flame  is  very  small 
in  size,  and  results  from  the  combustion 
of  a  mixture  of  oxygen  and  aceytlene. 
which  mixture  has  been  made  in  a  special 
burning  torch  or  blowpipe. 

Acetylene 

Acetylene  is  a  gas,  and  may  be  quoted 
approximately  as  92 V2  per  cent,  of  car- 
bon and  the  balance  hydrogen,  this 
only  being  approximate  on  account  of 
certain   small   percentages  of  impurities 

l^ndrRr^'if   riu   ''^^""'^    *''^    Coventry    (Eng- 
Engi'nefi  ""^    Institution    of    Automobile 


that  may  exist;  for  instance,  a  certain 
proportion  of  the  hydrogen  may  be  phos- 
pnuretted  and  suipnuretted. 

The  presence  of  hydrogen  retards  the 


combustion  of  carbon  in  oxygen,  so  in 
order  to  get  a  more  rapid  combustion, 
oxygen  is  mixed  with  acetylene,  which 
mixture  generates  the  hottest  flame  for 
welding,  a  heat  of  up  to  about  7,000  deg. 
F.  being  obtainable.  This  heat  is  greatly 
in  excess  of  the  heat  produced  by  the  oxy- 
hydrogen  flame,  the  heat  generated  by  the 
oxy-hydrogen  flame  being  only  about  4,000 
deg.  F. 

Two  important  methods  of  supplying 
acetylene  to  a  shop  in  which  the  welding 
of  metals  is  performed  are  largely  adopted 
these  being  either  to  have  portable  weld- 
ing outfits  which  include  the  generator, 
oxygen  cylinder,  flexible  pipes,  blowpipe. 


etc.,  or  to  have  the  generator  fitted  in  a 
special  shed  or  house  built  outside  of  the 
shop.  In  the  case  of  the  portable  outfit 
each  operator  has  ene  of  these  appliances, 
which  can  be  moved  to  any  part  of  the 
shon  as  required.  It  will  be  seen  that 
this  method  is  most  useful  in  shops  where 
welding  is  not  too  frequently  to  be  done. 
In  the  case  of  the  fixed  generator  the 
whole  supply  of  acetylene  for  the  use  in 
the  shop  can  be  produced  and  led  into  the 
shop  through  pipes,  the  size  of  the  gener- 
ator being  arranged  to  suit  the  size  anJ 
requirements  of  the  shop. 

Acetylene  Generators 
There  are  various  types  and  makes  of 
generators  now  on  the  market,  and  it 
will  be  very  interesting  and  I  hope  in- 
structive to  devote  some  attention  to  one 
or  two  of  these  types.  A  type  of  genera- 
tor suitable  for  attaching  to  a  portable 
welding  plant  is  shown  in  Fig.  1.  This 
generator  is  very  compact,  light  in  weight, 
and  has  the  advantage  of  being  adaptable 
to  almost  any  portable  framework,  as  it 
requires  no  fixing.  Adjustable  chains 
can  be  fitted  to  the  side  of  the  tank  for 
the  purpose  of  carrying  the  oxygen  cylin- 
der, in  which  case  it  is  unnecessary  for 
the  generator  to  be  fitted  on  a  framework; 
it  can  stand  on  the  floor  and  be  moved 
from  place  to  place  as  required.  The  fol- 
lowing table  shows  the  size  of  the  genera- 
tor in  comparison  with  the  output  of 
acetylene. 

Table  I. 

Output  of  Ch-rge 
HeiKht                    Weight         Acetylene  of 

per  Hour  Carbide 
Ft.       In.             Cwt.  Qr.  Lb.            Ft.  Lb. 


A  generator  of  this  description  is  auto- 
matically controlled,  and,  therefore,  re- 
quires little  or  no  attention  save  the 
charging  of  the  carbide  tray  and  the  fill- 
ing of  the  water  tank.     It  will  be  seen 


■^ 


FIG.  2.  FIXED  ACETYLENE  GENERATING  PLANT. 


September  6,  1917. 

from  Fig.  1  that  the  carbide  chambers  are 
actually  contained  in  the  water  tank, 
which  makes  the  generator  very  compact. 
The  plant  is  worked  as  follows:  Carbide  is 
placed  in  the  carbide  trays  or  generators 
(the  sketch  only  shows  one,  but  two  are 
fitted  side  by  side)  and  the  tank  is  filled 
with  water.  The  cock  W,  which  is  fitted 
to  the  pipe  T,  connecting  the  water  tank 
with  the  generators  is  then  opened,  and 
water  flows  from  the  water  tank  to  the 
generator;  acetylene  is  then  produced, 
and  passed  through  the  pipe  M  into  the 
water,  through  which  it  bubbles  into  the 
gas  bell ;  as  the  gas  bell  fills  with  acetylene 
it  rises,  being  steadied  by  guide  and  pil- 
lars. One  of  the  guides  on  the  gas  bell  has 
an  extension  fitted,  which  engages  with  a 
twisted  vertical  bar  S,  this  bar  controll- 
ing the  water  cock  U.  Now,  as  the  gas 
tell  fills  and  rises  the  bar  S  is  automati- 
cally operated  to  shut  off  the  water  cock 
U,  this  preventing  further  flow  of  water 
from  the  tank  into  the  generator.  The 
acetylene  is  taken  from  the  gas  bell 
through  the  pipe  N  and  is  passed  through 
the  purifier  D  to  the  burner.  It  should  be 
noted  that  the  acetylene  is  first  purified 
by  bein<j;  pnssed  through  the  water,  from 
the  pipe  M  into  the  gas  bell.  As  the 
acetylene  is  used,  the  gas  bell  falls,  and 
-the  cock  U  is  again  opened  to  allow  water 
to  pass  into  the  generator,  and  the  pro- 
cess repeats  itself. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 

lene  safe  for  handling  and  transporting, 
an  advantage  which  is  worth  considera- 
tion. Acetylene  is  probably  more  useful 
in  this  form  for  purposes  other  than  weld- 
ing, for  instance,  the  lighting  of  automo- 


Height 


Table   II. 

Output  of  Charge 

Weight         Acetylene  of 

per  Hour  Carbide 

Cwt.  Qr.   Lb.             Ft.  Lb. 


13 


100 
140 


A  type  of  fixed  generator  is  showrn  in 
"Fig.  2,  which  type  of  plant  does  not  differ 
in  principle  from  that  shown  in  Fig.  1. 
In  this  type  of  plant  the  generators  and 
the  purifying  chambers  are  independent 
of  the  gasholder.  It  will  be  noticed  that  a 
special  washing  chamber  H  is  provided 
through  which  the  acetylene  is  passed 
from  the  generators  to  the  gasholder.  The 
table  in  the  preceding  column  shows  a 
comparison  of  the  size  and  output  of  these 
types  of  plant. 

In  each  of  these  types  of  plant  the 
generators  can  be  recharged  with  carbide 
without  in  any  way  disturbing  the  supply 
of  acetylene,  as  the  gas  cannot  get  back 
from  the  holder  into  the  generators. 
These  types  of  generating  plants  are 
manufactured  as  standard  articles  in 
various  sizes. 

A  method  of  supplying  acetylene  to 
the  welding  torch,  which  is  not  commonly 
used  in  practice,  is  that  of  having  the 
gas  stored  in  tanks  or  cylinders,  instead 
of  generating  it.  The  acetylene  contained 
in  these  tanks  or  cylinders  is  dissolved  in 
a  liquid  called  acetone,  this  being  the  only 
known  liquid  that  will  dissolve  acetylene 
to  any  aopreciable  e.xtent.  Acetone  will 
dissolve  24  times  its  own  bulk  of  acetylene 
at  ordinary  atmospheric  pressure,  and 
also  possesses  the  strange  feature  of  de- 
stroying the  highly  explosive  nature  of 
acetylene  while  they  are  mixed  together. 
This  feature  has  the  extreme  advantage 
•of  rendering  cylinders  of  dissolved  acety- 


FIG.     4.      B.P.     SAFETY 
FIG.     3.      BACK     PRES-    VALVE       SHOWING 
SURE  SAFETY  VALVE.     WATER  UNDER   PRES- 
SURE. 

biles  and  ships,  where  generators  would 
be  a  more  dangerous  fitment.  Also  there  is 
the  possibility  of  drawing  the  acetone  out 
of  the  cylinder  with  the  gas,  if  the  rate  of 
discharge  of  the  gas  becomes  excessive, 
the  result  of  this  would  be  a  reduction  in 
heat  of  the  flame. 

Oxygen 

The  oxygen  which  is  used  to  support  the 
rapid  combustion  of  the  acetylene  is  not 
as  a  rule  manufactured  by  the  consumer, 
and  there  is  actually  only  one  firm  in  this 
country  at  present  which  manufactures 
this  gas  in  any  appreciable  quantities. 
The  supply  of  oxygen  is  by  no  means  ade- 
quate enough  to  meet  the  demand  for  in- 
dustrial purposes,  and  some  idea  of  the 
demand  can  be  gathered  from  the  fact 
that  the  British  Oxygen  Company  alone, 
who  are  at  present  making  additions  to 
the  oxygen-producing  plant,  hope  when 
this  is  completed  to  have  an  output  of 
approximately  375,000,000  cub.  ft.  per 
annum,  or  about  1,250,000  cub.  ft.  daily. 

The  pressure  and  consumption  of 
oxygen  is  governed  by  the  size  of  the  blow- 
pipe used  to  suit  various  thicknesses  of 
metals,  as  will  be  seen  from  Table  III. 

Table   III. 

Approximate  Approximate 

Thickness  Oxygen  Consumption 

of  Metals  to  be  Pressure  per  Hour 

Welded  Required  Oxygen   Acetylene 

In.  Lb.  Cub.  ft.    Cub.  ft. 

1-32  to  1-20  T,  2                   11,;. 

1-20  to  1-16  6  to  7  31.'.              3 

1-16  to  3-16  7  to  8  8   '              6 

3-16  to  .5-16  13  to  14  14                 11 

%  to  XU  21  to  22  35                 28 

%  to  %  27  56                42 

%  to  1  30  78                63 

1'-;  to  11. J  37  100                80 

Hi  to  2  40  125              100 

Oxygen  cylinders  are  made  in  sizes 
varying  to  contain  from  10  to  200  cub.  ft. 
of    the    gas,    the    size    most    commonly 


used  being  the  100  cubic  feet.  If 
the  welder  knows  the  actual  or  water 
capacity  of  the  cylinder,  he  can  determine 


the  approximate  volume  of  gas  remaining 
in  a  cylinder.  This  information  is  very 
useful,  and  in  reality  essential,  in  the 
case  where  a  welder  has  a  partly  spent 
oxygen  cylinder  and  a  somewhat  lengthy 
piece  of  welding  to  do,  in  order  that  it 
may  be  ascertained  if  sufficient  oxygen  is 
available  to  complete  the  work.  As  an  ex- 
ample the  following  may  be  taken.  Say  a 
piece  of  welding  work  is  required  on  metal 
of  %  in  to  %  in.  thick,  for  a  length  of, 
say,  2  feet.  This  will  necessitate  the  use 
of  a  blowpipe,  which  will  consume  42  cub. 
ft.  of  acetylene  per  hour,  and  the  work 
would  require  about  half  an  hour  in  which 
to  be  completed,  as  will  be  seen  from 
Tables  III.  and  IV. 

The  consumption  of  oxygen  for  this 
work  would  be  approximately  27Vi  cub. 
ft.  Now  if  we  assume  that  the  welder  has 
one  100  cub.  ft.  cylinder,  which  is  indicat- 
ing a  pressure  of  36  atmospheres,  would  it 
be  possible  to  execute  the  work?  The 
welder,  knowing  the  actual  or  water  capa- 
city of  100  cub.  ft.  cylinder,  say,  0.833  cub. 
ft.,  can  easily  estimate  the  possibilities  of 
being  able  to  complete  the  work  with  the 
use  of  this  cylinder.  Knowing  the  pressure 
of  gas  in  cylinder  (36  atmospheres)  and 
the  capacity  of  the  cylinder  (0.833  cub.  ft.) 
the  volume  of  gas  at  his  disposal  is  equal 
to  36  V  0.833=  30  cub.  ft.  (approximate- 
ly) .  If  we  deduct,  say,  2  cub.  ft.  or  3  cub. 
ft,  which  remain  in  the  cvlinder  when 
the  pressure  has  fallen  to  about  2  atmos- 
pheres, and  allow  for  the  possibility  of  a 
slightly  larger  consumption  of  oxygen  bv 
the  blowpipe,  we  are  left  with  approxi- 
mately 26  cub.  ft.  or  27  cub.  ft.  of  oxygen, 
and  it  would  probably  be  possible  to  finish 
the  work  if  it  were  done  rapidly. 

Installation 

Having  considered  the  production  of 
the  necessary  gases  for  oxy-acetylene 
welding,  the  next  point  to  note  is  the 
carrying  of  the  gases  to  the  place  for 
burning.  Where  a  fixed  generator  is  used 
it  is  necessary  to  have  fixed  nipes  for  the 
service  of  the  acetylene  to  the  place  (or 
nlaces  where  more  than  one  blowpipe  is 
being  served)  of  welding,  and  the  gas 
fed  to  the  blowpipe  by  a  flexible  tube  con- 
nection from  the  service  pipe.  Just  as 
the  use  of  copper  is  prohibited  in  the 
manufacture  of  acetylene  generators,  the 
use  of  copner  tubes  is  prohibited  for  serv- 
ing the  gas  to  the  blowpipe:  therefore, 
iron  pipes  should  be  used  for  this  purpose, 
and  these  should  oreferably  be  galvanized, 
as  the  presence  of  any  moisture  in  the  gas 
would  tend  to  form  iron  oxide,  which  may 
leave  the  pipe  and  accumulate  in  some 
more  vital  part  of  the  installation.  These 
fixed  pipes  should  be  fitted  to  the  wall  of 
the  shop,  and  should  be  arranged  with  a 
slight  upward  run,  so  that  any  moisture 
forming  in  the  pipe  would  tend  to  run 
bafk  to  the  generator. 

The  size  of  the  pin^s  fitted  depends  en- 
tirolv  on  the  number  and  size  of  the  blow- 
nines  to  be  used,  and  this  should  receive 
'■'ireful  consideration  in  arranging  for 
the  fittinT  of  an  oxv-acetvlene  welding  in- 
stallation in  anv  establishment.  There  is 
a  danee'-  of  the  pines  being  too  small  in 
size,  which  results  in  the  acetvlene  arriv- 
inp-  at  the  blownipe  in  insufficient  quan- 
tities and  probably  at  a  considerably  re- 


26b 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


duced  pressure,  hence  the  welder  may 
have  to  increase  the  pressure  of  the  oxy- 
gen he  is  using,  with  more  or  less  disas- 
trous results,  as  will  be  seen  later  in  the 
consideration  of  the  proportions  of  the 
gas  mixture.  It  should  be  remembered 
that  the  length  of  the  piping  should  be 
taken  into  account,  as  well  as  the  size  of 
the  blowpipes  to  be  used,  when  fixing  the 
diameter  of  the  piping,  in  order  that  the 
loss  of  pressure  of  the  acetylene  may  not 
be  excessive. 

The  Safety  Valve 
There  is  an  apparatus  that  is  absolutely 

FIG.   6.    NORMAL  FLAME. 

indispensable  in  the  welding  installation, 
this  being  the  safety  valve.  As  a  matter 
of  fact  each  blowpipe  must  have  a  safety 
valve  which,  in  the  case  where  a  portable 
acetylene  generator  is  used,  is  fitted  to 
the  generator,  and  where  a  fixed  genera- 
tor is  used  the  valves  are  fitted  to  the  fixed 
service  pipes,  in  each  case  the  acetylene 
passing  through  the  valve,  which  is  also 
connected  to  the  blowpipe  by  flexible  tub- 
ing. A  type  of  safety  valve  is  shown  in 
Fig.  3,  a  description  of  which  is  as  fol- 
lows: The  apparatus  consists  of  a  cham- 
ber or  tank  A,  which  is  fitted  with  a  fill- 
ing pipe  D,  by  which  the  tank  is  partly 
filled  with  water,  the  level  of  the  water 
being  regulated  by  the  drain  cock  E.  The 
pipe  B  is  connected  to  the  acetylene  ser- 
vice pipe,  and  an  outlet  pipe  C,  to  which 
the  flexible  tube  is  connected,  is  provided. 
The  object  of  fitting  this  safety  valve  is 
to  prevent  any  oxygen  from  getting  into 
the  acetylene  pipes,  as  would  happen  in 
the  case  of  the  blowpipe  becoming  tem- 
porarily choked  up  due  to  the  splashing 
of  molten  metal  or  other  causes,  if  a  de- 
vice of  this  description  were  not  fitted,  as 
the  oxygen  is  always  fed  at  a  greater 
pressure  than  the  acetylene;  hence  this 
safety  valve  prevents  the  formation  in 
the  pipes  of  a  mixture  of  the  two  gases, 


FIG.    7.     FLAME   SHOWINQ  EXCESS   OXYGEN. 

Which  would  be  of  an  explosible  nature, 
and  consequfetitly  dangerous  in  case  of 
the  flame  batk-firing. 

The  acetj'lene  is  passed  from  the  ser- 
vice pipe  into  the  water,  through  which 
it  bubbles,  and  passes  through  the  outlet 
pipe  to  the  blowpipe.  In  case  of  a  stop- 
page in  the  blowpipe  the  oxygen  passes 
through  the  flexible  tube  into  the  tank  A, 
and  as  the  pressure  in  the  tank  is  in- 
creased due  to  the  oxygen  not  being  able 
to  gain  an  outlet,  the  water-level  in  the 
tank  becomes  lower,  by  the  water  passing 
into  the  filling  pipe  and  the  acetylene  pipe, 
until  the  level  of  the  opening  into  the  fill- 
ing pipe  is  reached,  then  the  oxygen  bub- 
bles up  through  the  water  in  the  filling 
pipe  and  escapes  into  the  air,  as  shown  in 
Fig.  4.  These  valves  require  very  little 
attdtitioii,  save  the  checking  of  the  water- 


level  by  the  drain  cock  when  the  system  is 
in  use,  this  being  preferable  to  getting 
the  correct  level  under  working  pressure. 
The  feeding  of  the  oxygen  to  the  blow- 
pipe is  done  through  flexible  tubing  of 
three-ply  rubber,  which  is  preferable  to 
metallic  flexible  tubing,  owing  to  the  in- 
creased danger  arising  from  the  deterior- 
ation of  metallic  tubing  not  being  so 
noticeable  as  that  of  the  rubber  tubing. 

Blowpipe 

The  blowpipe  is  an  instrument  requir- 
ing careful  consideration  and  thought 
from  first  to  last,  in  the  first  place  in  the 
designing  and  lastly  in  the  handling  dur- 
ing operation — the  consideration  in  de- 
sign being  partly  to  make  the  instrument 
absolutely  safe  in  case  of  careless  hand- 
ling on  the  part  of  the  welder,  and  con- 
sideration on  the  part  of  the  welder  partly 
to  allow  for  bad  design.  The  blowpipe,  if 
properly  designed,  built  up  and  handled, 
is  an  instrument  of  simplicity  and  safety, 
being  light,  compact,  and  easy  to  handle. 
The  work  to  be  performed  by  the  blow- 
pipe, namely,  that  of  mixing  the  two 
gases,  is  of  extreme  importance,  as  the 
obtaining  of  a  good  sound  weld  to  a  great 
extent  depends  on  the  mixture  of  the 
gases. 

In  theory,  for  the  total  combustion  of 
one  volume  of  acetylene  2%  volumes  of 
oxygen  are  required,  but  in  actual  practice 
the  proportion  of  acetylene  to  oxygen 
varies  betvifeen  1  to  1  '4  and  1  to  1  % .  The 
result  of  a  weld  obtained  by  the  use  of  a 
mixture  of  gases  in  incorrect  proportions, 
may  be  of  a  very  unsatisfactory  nature, 
as  if  a  superabundance  of  oxygen  be  ad- 
mitted the  flame  produced  will  have  oxi- 
dizing effects,  whereas  if  a  superabund- 
ance of  acetylene  be  introduced  the  flame 
produced  will  have  a  carbonizing  effect, 
in  which  case  a  hardening  of  the  metal  in 
the  immediate  vicinity  of  the  weld  will 
result,  and  the  finished  work  will,  conse- 
quently, be  of  a  brittle  nature. 

The  correct  flame  for  welding  is,  there- 
fore, half-way  between  an  oxidizing  and 
a  carbonizing  one.  An  experienced  welder 
can  readily  estimate  the  proportions  of 
the  mixture  of  gases  he  is  using  by  a 
glance  at  the  flame  produced.  Some  idea 
of  the  flames  produced  by  different  mix- 
tures is  given  in  Figs.  5,  6  and  7.  Fig. 
.'i  shows  the  flame  produced  by  a  mixture 
v,nvin"-  an  excess  of  acetylene,  and  all 
blowpipes  should  be  able  to  produce  such  a 
flame  by  having  the  oxygen  admitted  at 


When  a  blowpipe  is  producing  this  type 
of  flame  the  acetylene  cock  on  it,  or  the 
outlet  cock  on  the  safety  valve,  should  be 
partly  closed,  till  a  flame  similar  to  that 
shown  in  Fig.  6  is  produced,  which  is  the 
correct  flame  to  use.  The  centre  white 
light  which  appears  in  Fig.  5,  as  a  some- 


what indeflnite  form  has  now  become 
smaller  and  more  definite.  If  a  further 
reduction  in  the  supply  of  acetylene  be 
made  by  closing  either  of  the  cocks  in  the 
acetylene  system  already  mentioned  the 
centre  white  light  becomes  much  smaller, 
as  shown  in  Fig.  7,  which  is  an  oxidizing 
flame,  produced  by  a  mixture  of  gases 
having     an  excess  of  oxygen. 

There  are  many  different  forms  of 
blowpipes  in  use,  but  the  general  principle 
is  the  same  in  each  case,  and  they  vary 
in  length  from  about  1  ft.  to  2  ft.  The 
blowpipe  as  shovirn  by  the  outline  sketch. 
Fig.  8,  consists  of  a  handle  through  which 
pass  two  tubes,  each  fitted  with  a  regulat- 
ing cock.  These  tubes  carry  the  gases  to 
a  mixing  chamber,  from  which  the  mix- 
ture is  passed  to  the  nozzle.  In  the  de- 
sign of  a  blowpipe  an  essential  point 
for  the  consideration  is  the  distribution  of 
weight,  as  the  instrument  should  as  nearly 
as  possible  balance  when  held  by  the  oper- 
ator, for  ease  of  manipulation. 

Blowpipes   are  divided  into  three  dis- 


I       ^Kit^r^iiJfjffMn 


Outmbtr 


FIG.  8.    OUTLINE  SKETCH  OF  BLOW-PIPE. 


normal  pressure  and  the  acetylene  at  full 
pressure,  although  this  flame  should  not 
be  used.  If  a  blowpipe  is  not  capable  of 
producing  a  flame  of  this  description, 
either  it  is  faulty,  or  the  system  for 
carrying  the  acetylene  from  the  generator 
is  in  some  way  out  of  order,  causing  the 
passage  of  the  acetylene  to  be  obstructed. 


tinct  classes,  which  are  named  according 
to  the  pressure  at  which  the  acetylene  is 
being  used,  namely:  (1)  low  pressure, 
(2)  medium  pressure,  (3)  high  pressure. 
The  pressures  at  which  the  acetylene  is 
used  are  approximately:  (1)  for  low  pres- 
sure, 0.1  to  0.25  lb.  per  square  inch, 
which  is  the  pressure  at  which  the  acety- 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


lene  is  generated;  (2)  for  medium  pres- 
sure, 1.5  lb.  to  5.5  lb.  per  square  inch;  (3) 
for  high  pressure,  4.5  to  7  lb.  per  square 
inch. 

High-pressure  blowpipes  are  not  com- 
monly used  in  practice,  in  consequence 
of  which  blowpipes  are  often  referred  to 
as  being  of  two  classes,  high  pressure 
and  low  pressure,  the  high  pressure  class 
being  what  in  reality  is  the  medium-pres- 
sure class.  The  real  high-pressure  blow- 
pipe is  only  adaptable  in  cases  where  dis- 
solved or  compressed  acetylene  is  being 
used,  all  other  forms  of  acetylene  having 
insufficient   pressure    for   the   mixing   of 


1 


the  gases.  Low-pressure  blowpipes  are 
also  uncommon  as  far  as  being  used  is 
concerned.  In  this  type  of  blowpipe  the 
gases  flow  at  a  very  low  speed,  and  back- 
firing is  experienced,  however,  safety  de- 
vices are  usually  fitted,  which  render  them 
safe  to  handle.  The  medium-pressure 
blowpipe  is  the  type  that  is  most  common- 
ly used,  and  has  very  few  disadvantages. 
In  this  tvpe  of  blowpipe  back-firing  is 
very  unlikely,  due  to  the  pressure  of  the 
gases,  which  keeps  the  speed  high. 

The  only  real  danger  experienced  in 
the  use  of  the  blowpipe  is  due  to  back- 
firing, and  this  is  provided  for  by  the 
fitting  of  safety  devices.  Attempts  have 
been  made  to  cut  out  this  small  piece  of 
the  installation,  but  the  results  have 
been  far  from  satisfactory. 

The  blow-pipe  is  usually  made  of 
brass,  and  is  constructed  in  such  a  way 
that  it  is  impossible  for  the  gases  to  mix 
before  they  reach  the  welding  head  or 
mixing  chamber.  The  nozzle  is  usually 
a  detachable  piece,  so  that  the  size  of  the 
orifice  can  be  varied  to  suit  the  consump- 
tion of  gases  required  for  different 
classes  of  work.  Blowpipes  are  usually 
supplied  with  a  series  of  nozzles,  which 
vary  according  to  the  consumption  of 
the  gases  required  for  the  different 
classes  of  work  to  be  done.  The  size  of 
the  nozzle  is  determined  by  the  consump- 
tion of  acetylene  per  hour,  and  the  sizes 
have  a  large  range,  being  made  to  use 
acetelyne  at  rates  varying  from  1  cub. 
ft.  to  100  cub.  ft.  per  hour.  These  noz- 
zles are  made  of  copper,  which  metal 
withstands  the  heat  much  better  than 
other  less  suitable  metals.  The  size  of 
nozzle  suitable  for  welding  various 
thicknesses  of  metal  may  vary  slightly 


7 


according  to  the  make  of  blowpipe  used, 
but  some  idea  of  the  consurhption  of 
acetylene  can  be  -gathered  from  Table  III. 
and  the  approximate  rate  at  which  the 
various  thicknesses  of  metals  can  be 
welded  by  using  nozzles  to  give  the 
consumptions  shown  therein  is  given  in 
Table  IV. 


Table  IV. 

Thickness  of  Metals  to  be         Approximate  run 
Welded.  per  Hour. 

Inches  Feet. 

1-32    to    1-20     3» 

1-20    to    1-16     .■iS 

1-16   to  3-16    20 

3-16   to   5-16    10 

%    to    In    6 

■Is    to    %    1 

%   to    1    3 

1V4    to   H/.    2 

Hi    to   2    1 

Some  idea  of  the  variation  in  costs  of 
welding  various  thicknesses  of  metals 
can  be  gathered  from  Tables  III  and  IV. 
To  take  a  comparison,  say  1  ft.  of  weld- 
ing is  to  be  done  on  a  metal  having  a 
thickness  of  1/20  in.,  and  also  a  similar 
length  on  a  similar  metal  having-  a 
thickness  of  2  in.  In  the  first  case  the 
consumption  of  oxygen  and  acetylene  is 
0.051  cub.  ft.  and  0.038  cub.  ft.  respec- 
tively, while  in  the  second  case  the  con- 
sumption of  oxygen  and  acetylene  is 
125  cub.  ft.  and  100  cub.  ft.  respectively. 
Hence,  the  proportion  for  the  costs  of 
the  gas  alone  is  as  1  to  2,500;  on  top  of 
this  the  time  taken  for  the  operation  is 
39  times  greater  in  the  second  case  than 
in  the  first   case. 

It  has  already  been  mentioned  that  the 
blowpipe  is  an  instrument  of  simplicity 
and  easy  to  handle,  but  also  being  an  in- 
strument of  precision,  very  great  care  is 
called  for  in  its  maintenance  if  a  perfect 
and  economical  working  is  to  be  exper- 
ienced. The  cleaning  of  the  nozzles 
should  be  attended  to  at  regular  inter- 
vals, and  great  care  is  required  here,  as 
the  size  and  shape  of  the  orifice  should 
not  be  altered,  because  any  change  in 
this  direction  will  cause  more  or  less 
serious  results  when  used  again.  Any 
increase  in  the  size  of  the  orifice  of  a 
nozzle  would  tend  to  decrease  the  ve- 
locity of  the  mixture  at  the  exit,  and  the 
tendency  to  back-fire  would  be  increased. 
It  is,  therefore,  advisable  in  cleaning  a 
nozzle  to  use  some  instrument  which  is 
not  harder  than  the  material  of  which 
the  nozzle  is  made,  and  a  suggested 
suitable  instrument  i.s  a  piece  of  brass 
wire,  which  should  be  run  through  the 
opening. 

In  order  to  ensure  that  the  interior  of 
the  blowpipe  is  kept  free  from  any  ob- 
struction, the  blowpipe  should  be  discon- 
nected from  the  feeding  tubes  and  the 
nozzles  connected  up  to  the  oxygen  tube, 
then  the  opening  for  feeding  oxygen  into 
the  instrument  should  be  temporarily 
closed,  and  a  current  of  oxygen  blown 
through  the  acetylene  passage.  By  play- 
ing on  the  end  of  the  acetylene  passage 
with  the  finger  a  fluctuation  in  the  ex- 
haust of  the  oxygen  is  caused,  and  the 
clearing  of  the  interior  of  the  blowpipe 
is  accomplished. 

It  is  advisable  to  avoid  the  dismantl- 
ing of  a  blowpipe  by  any  except  persons 
thoroughly  experienced  in  this  class  of 
work,  as  the  putting  together  of  the 
parts  requires  a  certain  amount  of  skill, 
the  accuracy  of  which  governs  the  cor- 
rect working  of  the  instrument. 

The  starting  up  and  stopping  of  the 
working  of  blowpipe  should  be  done  in  a 
methodical    manner,    and    the  following 

are    suggestions    for    doing    this,    refer- 
ences being  made  to  Fig.  9  which  shows 


an  outline  1 1  the  apparatus  in  the  vicin- 
ity of  the  operator.  First,  the  check- 
ing of  the  hydraulic  safety  valve  for 
water-level  ■should  be  done,  by  opening', 
the  overflow  cock,  and  recharging  with' 
water  if  np<-essary,  and  the  overflo^v 
cock  closed.  Now,  with  the  lower 
acetylene  tap  B  closed,  the  tap  C  should 
be  opened  then  the  oxygen  valve 
should  be  i  losed  and  the  cylinder  open- 
ed by  mean^  of  the  key.  The  adjusting 
screw  .should  then  be  adjusted  so  the 
require!;'  working  pressure  is  registerect 
by   the    gauge.      The    tap    B    should    be 


~3 


FIG.  ]?.  WELD  FOR  METAL  BETWEEN  . 
a-16"  AND  %". 

opened,  and  when  the  acetylene  is 
smelt  a;  the  nozzle  it  should  be  ignited, 
then  the  c.xygen  tap  should  be  opened 
to  admi!  the  oxygen  to  the  blowpipe. 
It  will  be  Tiecessary  to  correct  the  oxy- 
gen preh.surr,  which  wiJl  have  dropped, 
as  will  b€  seen  by  the  gauge,  due  to  the 
opening  ol  the  tap.  By  means  of  the 
tap  B  the  acetylene  should  be  shut  dovpn 
until  the  flame  is  normal  as  shown  in 
Fig.  6.  On  .stopping  work  the  acety- 
lene tap  r  should  be  closed  first,  then 
the  oxygen  tap  D,  and  in  case  of  work 
being  completely  stopped  the  oxygen 
cylinder  F^hnuld  also  be  shut  off  and  the 
pressure   jpleased  from  the  regulator. 

In  case  ot  a  back-fire  the  tap  C 
should  be  immediately  shut  off,  and 
the  blowpipo  should  not  be  relighted 
for  a  few  seconds.  Before  the  lighting 
up  of  the  blowpipe,  in  the  morning,  it 
may  be  necessary  to  disconnect  the 
acetylene  pipe  from  the  blowpipe,  in 
order  tc  rtrain  out  any  accumulated 
moisture.  , 

Properties   and  Welding  of  Different 
Metals 

The  use  ol  welding  instruments  is  a 
comparatively  simple  task  which  can 
be  easily  acquired  by  very  short  tuition 
or  practi(f  but  to  become  an  expert 
welder  i;  something  much  more  diffi- 
cult. In  order  to  be  able  to  execute 
welding  in  a  manner  worthy  of  the 
term  welding  it  is  necessary  for  fRe 
executant  ic  have  some  knowledge  of 
the  propei-ties  of  the  metals  which  are 
to  be  welded.  The  knowledge  of  the 
properties  of  metals  is  useful  in  the 
preparation   of  parts  to  be  welded,  and 


FIG.  13.    ■»  i:I,D  FOR  METAL  Q-VER  %"  THICK. 

it  is  often  due  to  the  lack  of  adequate 
preparation  that  comparatively  simple 
operations  in  welding  prove  to  be  fail- 
ures. The  metals  commonly  used  in  the 
engineering  industry  are  the  only  ones 
we  need  consider,  these  being:  cas^-- 
iron,  malleable  iron,  wrought  iron, 
ste<»ls,  copper,  brass  and  aluminum.     - 


262 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


Welding    Rods 

Welding  rods  are  used  to  replace  any 
metal  that  has  been  taken  away,  either 
due  to  damage  or  due  to  preparation  of 
the  article  to  be  welded.  Welding  rods 
should  be  used,  except  in  cases  where 
very  thin  metal,  say  less  than  16  gauge, 
is  being  welded.  Care  should  be  taken 
in  the  use  of  welding  rods  that  no  im- 
purities are  introduced  into  the  weld — - 
for  instance,  the  rods  should  be  kept 
free  from  dirt  or  rust.  Rods  having 
rust  on  them  are  oxidised,  and  it  has 
already  been  stated  that  an  oxidised 
weld  is  not  satisfactory.  It  is  advisable 
to  use  welding  rods  supplied  by  firms 
who  specialise  in  the  manufacture  of 
this  class  of  goods. 

In  welding  cast-iron  work  a  welding 
rod  of  alloy  iron  should  be  used,  known 
as  silicated  cast-iron  rod.  These  rods 
have  a  fair  percentage  of  silicon  in 
them,  which  tends  to  take  the  brittle- 
ness  out  of  a  weld  by  reacting  with  the 
carbon  in  the  iron. 

In  welding  steels  a  rod  of  Swedish 
iron  is  almost  invariably  used,  which, 
on  account  of  its  purity  makes  a  weld 
of  very  even  grain,  and  easily  machin- 
able. In  cases  where  special  classes  of 
steels  are  beina:  welded,  such  as  "high 
carbon  steel,"  "nickel  steel,"  etc.,  rods 
of  special  composition  should  be  used — 
for  instance  in  high  carbon  steel  there 
is  the  possibility  of  the  carbon  burning 
when  the  metal  is  being  fused,  and  the 
welding  rod  should  contain  an  excess  of 
carbon  in  order  to  replace  that  which  is 
t>umt,  so  that  the  finished  weld  will  be 
as  nearly  as  posible  similar  to  the  metal 
being  welded. 

Rods  of  phosphor-copper  are  used  for 
?idding  to  welds  made  in  copper,  while 
for  brass  a  rod  of  brass  is  used.  In  the 
case  of  these  metals  being  welded  in  the 
foi-m  of  sheets,  the  welding  rod  is  really 
in  the  form  of  a  -wire.  In  welding 
aluminium  a  rod  of  aluminium  should 
be  used.  These  rods  are  specially 
alloyed,  in  order  to  give  the  necessary 
even  flow  of  metal. 

In  all  cases  the  welding  rod  should 
not  be  added  until  the  metal  being  weld- 
ed is  melted,  and  for  this  reason  the 
rods  ave  alloyed  to  give  them  a  lower 
melting-point  than  the  metals  being 
welded,  so  that  the  filling  rods  can  be 
added  without  allowing  the  metal  to 
cool  down,  for  if  molten  metal  comes 
in  contact  with-  cooler  metal  the  result 
is  simply  an  adhesion,  and  not  a  weld. 

Fluxes 

Flux  is  used  in  welding  as  a  cleansing 
agent,  and  is  usually  in  the  form  of  a 
powder.  In  the  melting  of  metals  it 
often  happens  that  impurities  will  be 
left  solid  after  the  metal  has  reached 
fusing-point,  also  it  often  happens  that 
oxides  foi-m  which  have  a  higher  melt- 
ing-point than  the  actual  metal — ^for 
instance,  in  aluminium,  as  already  men- 
tioned, alumina  forms,  which  has  a 
melting-point  much  in  excess  of  the 
melting-point  of  the  aluminium  (about 
S.OOO  deg.  F.).  The  purpose  of  using 
P"  -  is  to  float  off  these  impurities,  or 
lo    ".oduce    a    deoxidising    effect    -which 


will  retard  the  forming  of  oxides,  and 
therefore  keep  the  metals  clean  for 
welding  together.  These  fluxes,  like 
welding  rods,  form  a  speciality  in  manu- 
facture, and  include  various  mixtures. 
Samples  of  flux  for  iron  and  flux  for 
copper  and  brass  are  here  Shown. 
Fluxes  should  not  be  used  by  spreading 
on  the  weld,  but  should  toe  used  by 
dipping  the  welding  rods  into  them  and 
transferring  to  the  weld. 

Preparation  of  Parts  to  be  Welded 

It  is  important  to  make  some  prepar- 
ation to  the  pieces  to  be  welded,  and  in 
this,  there  is  a  certain  amount  of  scope 
for  sound  judgment  on  the  part  of  the 
welder  to  make  the  most  suitable 
preparation  for  the  nature  of  the  weld 
to  be  made.  However,  for  straightfor- 
ward work  there  are  one  or  two  points 
which  apply  generally.  Plate  work  of 
a  thickness  of  less  than  1/16  in.  can  be 
welded  with  straight  edges  (Fig.  10); 
then  for  thicknesses  between  1/16  in. 
and  fl/16  in.  the  edges  of  the  pieces 
should  be  bevelled  slightly  (Fig.  11). 
With  plates  or  pieces  of  thicknesses  be- 
tween 3/16  in.  and  %  in.  the  angle  of 
the  bevel  should  be  increased  (Fig.  12.) 
and  for  thicknesses  exceeding  %  in.  t^p 
pieces  should  be  double^bevelled  (Fig. 
1.3).  In  all  cases  the  ibevelled  edges 
should  be  cleaned  to  remove  any  oxide 
that  may  exist.  This  bevelling  is  nec- 
essary so  that  the  operator  can  rea'-h 
the  far  side  with  the  flame  and  weldinsr 
rod,  as  in  cases  wliere  attempts  have 
been  made  to  weld  pieces  of  metal  of  a 
reasonable  thickness  without  first 
bevelling  the  edges  the  metal  has  melted 
throughout  the  whole  thickness  at  the 
same  time,  and  the  small  white  flame 
has  swept  the  molten  metal  away  on 
the  near  side,  thus  spoiling  the  weld. 

Incidentally  it  may  be  worth  men- 
tioning here  that  the  small  white  por- 
tion of  the  flame  should  never  -ome 
into  contact   with  the  metal. 

Preheating 

One  of  the  sources  of  trouble  in 
welding  is  the  liability  to  develop 
cracks,  which  result  in  a  broken  weld, 
but  this  liability  can  be  greatly  reduced 
by  the  practice  of  preheating.  In  the 
welding  of  metal  it  is  necessary  to  raise 
the  temperature  of  the  metal  from  that 
of  the  surrounding  air  to  the  melting- 
point  of  the  metal,  and  one  of  the  ad- 
vantages of  preheating  is  that  whole 
piece  of  metal  to  be  welded  can  be  ex- 
panded, so  that  after  the  weld  has  been 
made  a  uniform  contraction  will  take 
place,  and  prevent  breakage  of  the  weld. 
It  is  not  the  expanding  of  the  metal  that 
is  the  cause  of  damage  so  much  as  the 
contracting,  for  a  weld  may  appear  tc 
be  good  and  satisfactory  after  comple- 
tion, but  unless  some  allowance  has 
been  made  for  the  contraction,  a  break 
is  more  likely  than  not  to  occur. 

Applications  to  Automobile  Engineering 

Welding  is  not  a  practice  that  is 
adopted  to  any  great  extent  in  the  pro- 
duction of  automobile  parts.  One  of- 
the  outstanding  features  of  welded 
parts  is  the  fact  that  comparative  light- 


ness can  be  obtained,  where  the  part  is 
not  subject  to  much  stress,  by  the  use  of 
thin  metal.  This  fact  should  'be  taken 
advantage  of  in  the  manufacture  of 
light  cars  as  much  as  ever  possible.  Of 
course  without  considering  light  car 
design  it  is  impossible  definitely  to  state 
which  parts  should  be  built  up  and 
welded.  In  general  automobile  practice 
the  extreme  lightness  which  is  charac- 
teristic of  the  light  car  is  not  required, 
hence,  the  practice  of  welding  is  not 
adopted  to  so  great  an  extent  as  would 
be  done  in  case  of  necessity;  however, 
cases  of  necessity  do  occur. 

Rear  axles  can  be  built  up  of  steel 
tubes,  with  a  central  bronze  casting,  by 
welding,  this  being  the  only  method  of 
makir.T  a  sound  permanent  joint.  Parts 
such  as  water  pipes  should  be  built  up 
by  welding,  all  flanges  being  welded  to 
the  pipes,  and  branch  pipes  welded  to 
the  main  pipe.  Flanges  can  be  welded 
to  exhaust  pipes,  and  silencers  can  be 
completely  built  up  by  welding,  but  this 
is  not  altogether  practicable,  on  account 
of  the  difficulty  of  dismantling  if  it  be- 
comes necessary  for  cleaning  inside. 
Brackets  of  various  description  can  be 
built  up  by  welding,  but  where  thin 
metal  is  required  pressings  become  a 
reasonable  competitive  proposition; 
however,  where  different  thicknesses  arc 
-.equired  on  a  part  pressings  are  impos- 
sible for  the  complete  part.  Radiators 
made  up  of  pressings  welded  together 
are  quite  a  commercial  proposition, 
especially  for  commercial  vehicle  work, 
and  can  be  turned  out  in  quantities 
quite  easily  by  an  intelligent  operator. 
For  touring  car  work  cast  radiaitor 
tanks  and  brackets  are  preferable  on 
account  of  a  better  appearance  being 
obtainable. 

In  the  experimental  department  of  an 
automobile  manufacturing  works  weld- 
ing can  be  applied  with  some  advantage, 
for  the  cost  of  patterns  for  castings 
might  be  eliminated  to  a  great  extent. 
Alterations^  to  the  compression  of  an 
engine  can  be  carried  out  by  cutting  the 
connecting  rod  and  welding  up  to  make 
it  either  longer  or  shorter  as  required. 
Lugs  or  bosses  can  be  welded  to  castings 
or  other  existing  parts;  in  fact  the  prac- 
tical use  of  we'ding  in  the  experimental 
deoartment    is    almost    unlimited. 

In  foundry  work  the  practice  of  weld- 
ing is  also  applicable,  as  in  the  trim- 
ming of  castings  slight  breakage  fre- 
quently occurs,  and  repair  by  welding 
is  preferable  to  scrapping  the  casting. 

Repair  Work 

Breakages  are  more  or  less  frequent 
in  almost  every  detail  used  in  the  con- 
struction of  automobile  work,  and  prev- 
ious to  the  adoption  of  oxyacetylene 
welding  for  the  repair  of  such  break- 
ages the  parts  had  to  be  replaced  at 
some  considerable  expense  to  the  owner. 
Now  that  the  art  of  repair  to  breakages 
has  become  a  satisfactory  proposition, 
the  parts  thrown  over  to  the  scrap  heap 
by  the  automobile  o-wner  are  less  num- 
erous. However,  to  the  automobile 
manufacturer,  the  carrying  out  of  re- 
pairs    is     a    much      more      satisfactory 


September  6,  1917. 

proposition  by  replacement  than  by 
patching  up  the  existing  part,  as  re- 
gards both  finance  and  labour,  except  in 
cases  where  the  part  is  of  ancient  de- 
sign and  some  difficulty  would  be  ex- 
perienced in  getting  a  single  part 
through  the  works. 

A  common  breakage  in  cylinders  is  in 
the  water  jacket,  often  caused  by  the 
freezing  of  the  water,  and  such  break- 
ages can  be  repaired  satisfactorily  by 
welding.  One  point  worth  noting  is 
that  all  damaged  metal  should  be  cut 
away  in  order  to  make  a  clean  surface 
for  welding. 

Base  chambers  and  gear  cases  are 
among  the  parts  requiring  careful 
handling  and  -preparation  in  repair 
work,  the  main  difficulty  in  these  parts 
being  the  liability  for  error  in  the  align- 
ment of  the  bearing.  However,  by 
careful  preparation  in  the  way  of  ad- 
justing the  broken  parts  and  preheating, 
this  difficulty  should  be  overcome. 
Where  the  metal  is  damaged,  the  dam- 
aged parts  should  be  cut  away  and  a 
new  piece  welded  in.  No  satisfactory 
result  can  be  obtained  by  pouring  molten 
metal  into  a  crevice,  as  adhesion  takes 
place  instead  of  the  new  and  old  metals 
becoming  joined  as  one  piece,  with  the 
result  that  when  the  new  metal  cools 
down,  cracks  are  almost  certain  to  ap- 
pear. Parts  such  as  base  chambers  and 
gear  cases  are  mostly  made  in  alum- 
inium, and  in  repairing  aluminium  the 
work  should  invariably  be  preheated  to 
about  600  deg.  F. 

Breakages  in  frames  can  be  satisfac- 
torily repaired  by  welding,  but  as  a  rule 
it  is  advisable  to  back  up  the  portion  n* 
the  frame  in  the  vicinity  of  the  repair 
with  a  plate,  because  a  breakage  in  a 
frame  is  a  sign  of  weakness  due  more 
often  than  not  to  unfair  distribution  of 
the  load  on  the  part  of  the  owner  or 
owner's  representatives. 

TeeUi  can  be  welded  to  broken  gear 
wheels,  but  this  work  should  be  care- 
fully adjusted  and  clamped,  then  pro- 
heated  before  actually  welding.  The 
tooth  or  teeth  to  be  welded  in  should  be 
positioned  by  a  plate,  having  slots  cut 
in  at  the  correct  pitch  of  the  teeth,  so 
that  the  plate  fits  to  portions  of  each  of 
the  two  pieces  to  be  welded  together. 

@ 

ELECTRIC    STEEL-HARDENING 
PROCESS 

THERE  has  been  recently  patented  and 
developed  a  method  of  hardening  steel 
by  means  of  electricity  known  as  the 
Wild-Barfield  process,  which,  while  fol- 
lowing recognized  practice  in  the  fact 
that  the  steel  is  hardened  by  heating  and 
quenching,  exhibits  its  principal  depart- 
ure from  customary  practice  in  the 
manner  in  which  the  correct  tempera- 
ture of  the  steel  is  determined. 

The  process  is  carried  out  by  means 
of  the  electrical  furnace,  shown  in  the 
accompanying  engraving,  which  contains 
an  electrical  heating  coil  embedded  in 
the  lining  A;  the  cylindrical  shell  is  of 
suitable  heat  insulating  material.  The 
actual  furnace  temperature  is  measured 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 

by  a  thermo-couple  in  the  usual  way, 
being  maintained  above  the  decalescent 
point  of  the  steel  to  be  hardened.  The 
manner  in  which  it  is  ascertained  when 
the  steel  has  reached  this  point  involves 
recognition  of  the  phenomenon  that  steel 
loses    its    magnetic    properties    when    its 


SELF-INDICATING   ELECTRIC   FURNACE    FOR 
HARDENING    STEEL. 


temperature     reaches      the     decalescent 
point. 

Solenoid  Principle 

The  heating  coil  when  in  use,  acts 
in  a  similar  manner  to  a  solenoid  coil, 
radiating  magnetic  flux  which  is  increas- 
ed when  a  core  of  magnetic  material, 
i.e.,  the  gauge  or  other  steel  body  to  be 
hardened,  is  inserted.  The  presence  of 
liquid  salt  as  a  heatmg  nieaium  m  tne 
furnace  slightly  reduces  the  influence  of 
the  core  on  action  of  the  coil. 

On  the  exterior  surface  ot  the  tur- 
nace  is  wound  a  coil  of  insulated  wire 
B,  connected  to  a  reflecting  galvano- 
meter, whose  spot  of  light  is  arranged 
to  move  on  a  scale  in  the  usual  way. 
When  the  piece  of  work  is  being  insert- 
ed in  the  furnace,  the  increase  of  the 
magnetic  flux  from  the  heating  coil  in- 
duces a  current  in  coil  B  and  deflects 
the  light  spot.  As  soon  as  the  piece  of 
work  is  in  position,  the  magnetic  flux 
from  the  solenoid  remains  steady  at  the 
increased  value  so  that  the  external  cur- 
rent in  coil  B  ceases  and  the  light  spot 
goes  back  to  zero.  These  actions  how- 
ever are  meanwhile  irrelevant  to  the 
final   determination   of  temperature. 

The  influence  of  the  work  during  heat- 
ing on  the  magnetic  flux  from  the  solen- 
oid coil  is  stationary,  until  the  temper- 
ature is  reached  at  which  the  steel  be- 
comes non-magnetic,  i.e.,  the  decales- 
cent  point.     The  loss   of  magnetism   by 


r  263 

the  work  takes  place  in  a  comparative- 
ly short  space  of  time,  and  affects  the 
flux  of  the  solenoid  coil  in  a  manner 
equivalent  to  withdrawing  the  core 
when  magnetised.  The  decreasing  mag- 
netic flux  of  the  solenoid  coil  brought 
about  by  this  state  of  the  work  induces 
an  external  current  in  coil  B  in  the  op- 
posite direction  to  that  previously  in- 
duced, deflecting  the  light  spot  accord- 
ingly, and  if  the  work  remained  in  place 
in  this  demagnetized  condition  the  spot 
of  light  would  return  to  zero  when  con- 
ditions became  constant  again.  This 
second  movement  of  the  light  spot  is 
therefore  the  indication  that  the  mag- 
netism of  tlie  work  is  vanishing  due  to 
its  assuming  that  condition  which  will 
enable  it  to  harden  when  suddenly 
quenched. 

Rapid  Operation 

Rapidity  of  operation  is  a  feature  of 
the  apparatus,  a  1  in.  plug  screw  gauge 
being  raised  to  quenching  temperature 
in  II2  minutes,  the  use  of  a  salt  bath 
being  also  conducive  to  uniformity  of 
results.  Results  of  tests  carried  out  at 
National  Physical  Laboratory,  London, 
for  the  Hardness  Tests  Research  Com- 
mittee are  given  below.  The  steel  experi- 
mented with  was  ordinary  tool  steel, 
containing  1..5  per  cent,  carbon.  Two 
specimens  were  hardened  in  the  usual 
way  by  quenching  in  water,  and  two 
others  were  treated  by  the  Wild-Bar- 
field process,  as  applied  to  screw  gauges. 
The  scleroscope  and  resistance-to-abra- 
sion figures  for  these  four  specimens 
were  as  follows: — 

SeIeroscoi)e  abrasion 

Water    quenched    81-110  560,  560 

Water    quenched    78-112  420.  530 

Wild-Barfield    68  710.710 

Wild-Barfield    70  710!  560 

In  connection  with  these  figures  it  is 
to  be  noted  that  in  the  opinion  of  most 
the  scleroscope,  whatever  property  or 
combination  of  properties  it  may  pre- 
cisely measure,  does  not  give  a  figure 
which  is  a  just  measure  of  that  property 
which  it  is  desired  to  confer  on  steel  by 
"hardening"  it.  It  does  not  necessarily 
follow,  therefore,  that  the  scleroscope 
figures  quoted  above  imply  that  the 
Wild-Barfield  process  yields  a  softer 
material  than  the  water  quenched.  On 
the  other  hand,  the  scleroscope  figures 
do  establish  the  fact  that  water  quench- 
ing does  not  give  a  uniformly  treated 
product;  the  figure  obtained  varies,  it 
will  be  senn,  over  a  wide  range  for 
different  parts  of  the  same  specimen. 
Methods  of  directly  testing  resistance  to 
abrasion  are  not  yet  wholly  satisfactory, 
and  it  is  quite  probable  that  the  figures 
420  for  the  water  quenched  specimen 
and  560  for  the  Wild-Barfield  are  due  to 
irregularities  in  the  testing  machine. 

@ 

COAL  DUST  IN   MOULDING   SAND 

By  F.  J. 

THE  inclusion  of  coal  dust  as  an  in- 
gredient in  moulding  sand  has  three 
main  objects:  first  the  heat  of  the  mol- 
ten metal  carbonises  the  coal  dust  and  so 
makes  the  mould  porus  to  the  gases 
given  off'  by  the  metal;  second,  the  gas 


264 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


from  the  coal  dust  prevents  in  some 
measure  the  fusion  of  the  sand  by  the 
iron,  and  thereby  results  in  a  casting 
with  a  much  smoother  face  than  would 
otherwise  be  the  case;  and,  thirdly,  the 
effect  of  the  carbon  in  the  coal  is  to 
make  the  skin  of  the  casting  soft  and 
dark  in  color.  Opinion  and  practice 
with  regard  to  the  .  selection,  grading 
and  proportioning  of  coal  dust  in  mould- 
ing sand  varies  widely  and  though  the 
subject  of  coal-dust  has  been  by  no  means 
neglected,  there  is  still  room  for  a  com- 
prehensive study  of  the  whole  question, 
one  embracing  not  only  experimental  re- 
search but  also  the  gathering  of  infor- 
mation in  regard  to  current  practi.ce  in 
the  best  foundries. 

In  selecting  a  suitable  quality  of  coal 
four  points  have  to  be  watched:  the 
bituminous  quality  of  the  coal,  the  ash 
content,  the  volatile  content,  and  the 
proportion  of  fixed  carbon.  Hitherto, 
too  much  importance  has  been  attached 
to  low  ash  content  and  high  percentage 
of  carbon,  without  due  regard  for  the 
fact  that  such  a  coal  must  necessarily 
prove  low  in  bituminous  qualities,  and 
be  altogether  of  too  refractory  a  char- 
acter to  fulfil  the  four  ideals.  A  good 
working  coal  dust  for  general  foundry 
use  should  show  about  12  per  cent,  ash, 
37  of  volatiles  and  51  per  cent,  of  fixed 
carbon.  This  ash  allowance  will  seem 
high,  but  the  volatiles  have  to  be  taken 
into  consideration,  and  it  has,  in  fact, 
been  found  that  scabbed  castings  with 
harsh,  uneven  skin,  have  resulted  from 
the  use  of  coal  dust  in  which  the  ash 
content  was  much  lower.  Especially 
was  this  the  case  in  some  experiments 
made  with  good  class  anthracite,  in 
which  the  percentage  of  ash  was  under 
4,  and  the  conclusion  arrived  at  was 
that  the  coal  dust  had  resisted  the  heat 
so  much,  owing  to  the  presence  of  a  high 
percentage  of  carbon,  that  it  had  acted 
as  a  refractory,  and  actually  prevented 
the  escape  of  gases  from  the  mould  by 
closing  up  the  pores.  As  regards  the 
fineness  of  the  coal  dust,  the  grade  must, 
of  course,  vary  according  to  the  class  of 
work  and  the  grade  of  the  sand. 

For  very  light  castings  a  coal  dust  of 
exceedingly  fine  grade  must  be  used, 
especially  if  the  sand  has  an  open  tend- 
ency, while  a  slightly  coarser,  though 
still  fine  grade  should  be  used  for  less 
light  work.  For  the  larger  class  of 
castings,  in  which  it  is  necessary  for 
a  considerable  volume  of  gases  to  es- 
cape quickly,  the  medium  and  coarse 
grades  of  coal  dust  are  more  appro- 
priate, blackings  or  facings  being  used 
to  secure  a  smooth,  even  skin  on  the 
casting.  Where  coal  dust  of  too  coarse 
a  grade  for  the  size  of  the  casting  is 
being  used,  the  error  is  often  evinced  by 
the  appearance  of  small  pits  on  the  face 
of  the  casting,  which  are  easily  distin- 
guishable by  their  formation  from  the 
indentations  caused  by  the  presence  of 
coarse  grains  in  the  sand,  and  are  caus- 
ed by  gas  from  the  carbonized  coal 
grains  pressing  into  the  molten  metal 
instead  of  escaping  through  the  sand. 
As  to     the  proportions,  much     depends 


upon  local  circumstances — class  of  cast- 
ing, sand  used,  thoroughness  of  mixing 
and  quality  of  coal  dust,  etc.,  but  two 
mixtures  which  have  been  used  with  ex- 
cellent results  are  as  follows: — one,  55 
parts  old  sand,  30  parts  new  sand  and 
15  parts  coal  dust.  This  is  for  heavy 
castings,  and  the  other,  which  is  suit- 
able for  light  work  is  70  parts  old  sand, 
25  parts  new  and  5  parts  coal  dust. 

— m — 

A  HANDY  SAFETY  VALVE  CHART 

By  N.  G.  Near 
A  FORMULA  which  I  believe  is  worthy 
of  working  into  chart  form  is  presented 
herewith.     This  is  the  formula: 

A=0.2074  W  G 


Where  A=the  area  of  the  safety  valve 
in   square  inches; 

P=the  absolute  pressure  in  pounds 
per  square  inch; 

W=pounds  of  water  evaporated  per 
square  foot   of  grate   surface   per  hour; 

Gr^the  grate  area  in  square  feet. 

To  use  the  chart  simply  lay  a 
straight  edge  across  the  chart  twice  as 
shown  by  means  of  the  dotted  lines 
drawn  across  this  chart  and  the  area  is 
immediately  found  in  column  C  without 
doing  any  pencil  or  mental  figuring  at 
all. 

First  connect  the  evaporation  per  sq. 
ft.  of  grate  surface  per  hour  (column 
A)'with  the  grate  area  (column  D)  and 
locate  the  intersection  with  column  B. 
Then  run  a  line  through  the  absolute 
pressure  (also  in  column  A)  and  the  in- 


5  ■ 

ac    ■ 

M   '■ 

LL.       - 

6  —to 


J,  --3o 
2 

o 

<  --50 


5 --too 


<  4-30O 
A 


^ 

•5 

fc 

.-7 

-6 


-6--3o< 
uJ 

5ov!> 
<io 


20 '■-loo 
C    D 


tersection  which  has  already  been  lo- 
cated and  the  intersection  of  this  line 
with  column  C  gives  the  area. 

For  example,  what  area  of  safety 
valve  is  required  where  60  pounds  of 
steam  are  evaporated  per  square  foot 
of  grate  per  hour,  where  the  grate  area 


is  40  square  feet,  and  where  the  steam 
pressure  is  150  pounds  absolute  ? 

The  dotted  lines  show  how  this  parti- 
cular problem  is  solved.  Connect  the  60 
(column  A)  with  the  40  (column  D) 
and  locate  the  point  where  the  line  cuts 
column  B.  Then  run  a  line  through 
this  point  and  the  150  (column  A)  and 
an  extension  of  this  line  cuts  column 
C  at  the  point  3.3.  The  area  of  the 
safety  valve  should  therefore  be  at  least 
3.3   square  inches. 

I  believe  this  method  of  making  dou- 
ble use  of  column  A  will  interest  read- 
ers. It  serves  both  for  the  pressure  and 
the  evaporation.  The  first  line  connect- 
ing the  60  and  40  represents  a  multipli- 
cation as  is  evident  by  inspection  of  the 
formula.  The  second  line  performs  the 
division. 

— m — 

TESTS    FOR   OILS    AND   VARNISHES 

By   C.   T. 

ONE  of  the  most  reliable  tests  for  raw 
and  boiled  oils  is  the  flash  test,  the 
temperature  at  which  linseed  oils  usual- 
ly flash  being  470  deg.  Fahr.,  whilst 
mineral  oil,  which  is  the  chief  adulter- 
ant of  linseed  oil  flashes  at  about  400 
deg.  F.,  and  resin  oil  still  lower,  so  that 
the  flash  test  is  a  simple  method  of  de- 
tecting adulterants. 

If  the  amount  of  the  adulterant  in  the 
oil  is  to  ascertained  weigh  a  portion 
and  place  it  in  a  beaker  or  any  suitable 
vessel,  and  add  a  small  quantity  of  caus- 
tic soda,  alcohol,  and  a  little  water.  The 
contents  of  the  vessel  should  be  then 
boiled  for  some  time,  with  constant  stir- 
ring, after  which  the  oil  will  be  found 
to  be  saponified,  whilst  the  adulterants 
will  be  unchanged.  The  mass  is  then 
poured  into  a  separating  vessel,  and 
ao-itated  with  benzine  until  it  takes  up 
the  mineral  oil,  which  afterwards  comes 
to  the  surface  of  the  vessel.  The  bot- 
tom layer  is  then  run  ofl"  and  the  top 
portion  is  well  washed  with  warm  water 
until  all  traces  of  the  saponified  oil 
have  disappeared.  The  residde,  which 
is  mineral  oil,  is  placed  in  a  vessel  and 
weighed. 

Common  resin  is  also  used  as  an  adul- 
terant, and  may  be  easily  detected,  if  in 
any  considerable,  quantities,  by  painting 
some  of  the  oil  on  any  glass  surface, 
and  when,  it  is  thoroughly  dry,  rubbing 
well  with  the  finger.  If  the  oil  contains 
much  resin  the  film  will  leave  the  glass 
and  crumble,  whilst  a  good  oil  will  not 
be  aff'eoted. 

The  only  reliable  test  for  turpentine 
is  distillation.  The  chief  adulterants 
are  shale  spirits,  Russian  turpentine, 
resin  spirit  and  coal-tar  naphtha.  The 
determination  of  the  proportion  of  the 
adulterant  would  require  special  chemi- 
cal apparatus,  but  a  simple  method  is  to 
warm  a  sample  of  the  suspected  turpen- 
tine and  a  sample  of  pure  American 
turpentine.  Should  the  suspected  tur- 
pentine contain  any  of  the  above  adul- 
terants they  may  be  easily  detected  by 
the  odor,  which  is  entirely  different 
from  the  pure  American  turpentine. 


September  6,  1917. 


265 


EDITORIAL  CORRESPONDENCE 

Embracing  the  Further   Discussion  of  Previously  Published    Articles,  Inquiries    for 
General  Information,    Observations    and    Suggestions — Your  Co-operation  is  Invited 


CO-PARTNERSHIP 

By  Mark  Meredith. 

THE  great  war  in  which  the 
world  is  now  engaged  has  brought 
about  the  solution  of  many  in- 
teresting and  serious  problems  in 
British  national,  business  and  social  life; 
but  there  are  numerous  others  which  call 
for  grave  consideration,  amongst  the 
most  important  of  which  is  what  is  gener- 
ally termed  the  labor  problem.  That  this 
problem  will  become  more  acute  so  long 
as  the  war  continues  and  that  it  will  un- 
doubtedly attain  its  climax  when  the  war 
is  over  and  millions  of  men  are  relieved 
from  military  service,  are  conclusions  to 
which  the  most  intelligent  and  shrewd 
business  men  are  being  forced. 

From  a  close  study  of  the  relations  of 
capital  and  labor  from  within,  many 
authorities  are  agreed,  from  a  study  of 
the  abilities,  habits,  intelligence  and  pre- 
judices of  working  men  as  a  class,  that 
co-partnership  is  the  one  means  of  bring- 
ing capital  and  labor  into  more  friendly 
and  satisfactory  relationship,  and  whilst 
it  also  affords  a  practical  solution  of  the 
labor  problem,  it  ensures  a  return  to  the 
supremacy  in  the  industrial  world  which 
Britain  once  held. 

No    Universal    Scheme 

Whilst  this  may  be  accepted  as  the 
verdict  of  expert  judges  and  practical 
business  men  there  is  no  universal 
scheme  of  co-partnership  which  is  applic- 
able to  all  industries,  for  each  scheme 
should  be  the  result  of  careful  and  seri- 
ous consideration,  and  may  conceivably 
differ  very  definitely,  both  in  detail  and 
administration  from  some  of  those  in 
operation  in  many  works  that  recognize 
the  stimulus  the  sharing  of  profits  gives 
to  the  workpeople.  There  are,  of  course, 
certain  broad  principles  which  must  be 
kept  in  view  in  this  endeavor  to  secure  a 
higher  efficiency  in  the  woi'ker,  of  all  busi- 
ness men  who  have  studied  this,  Lord 
Leverhulme  (till  recently  Sir  William 
Lever)  has  given  it  most  careful  thought 
and  consideration,  and  the  following  prin- 
ciples have  been  evolved  from  his  experi- 
ences and  also  many  others,  based  upon 
actual  experience. 

Co-partnership,  or  profit-sharing,  must 
be  kept  from  degenerating  into  charity  or 
philanthropy,  and  its  object  must  be  in- 
creased efficiency  of  the  undertaking 
adopting  it,  with  increased  prosperity  of 
all  connected  therewith.  It  must  not  place 
management  in  the  position  of  servant  to 
labor,  but  it  must  ensure  absolute  free- 
dom to  labor  from  interference  of  man- 
agements in  the  enjoyment  of  the  benefits 
to  be  derived  from  profit-sharing.  There 
must  be  greater  stability  than  a  mere  cash 
pajTTient  bonus  system,  and  there  must  be 
an  elevating  tendency  on  management 
and  labor,  raising  them  in  the  social  and 
industrial     scale,    and    increasing    their 


power  of  enjoyment  and  happiness,  as 
well  as  their  power  of  usefulness.  It  is 
eminently  desirable  that  the  workers' 
wives  and  families  should  feel  the  benefits 
of  the  system,  but  that  system  must  be 
such  that  it  is  not  antagonistic  to  the 
legitimate  rights  and  privileges  of  the 
working  man,  whether  the  brain  or  the 
hands  are  the  means  of  work.  It  is  ad- 
visable that  control  remain  with  those 
who  find  the  cash  capital. 

In  considering  the  adoption  of  the  prin- 
ciples of  co-partnership  every  firm  must 
carefully  consider  the  scheme  which  it 
proposes  to  adopt,  in  relation  to  the  class 
of  workmen  who  form  the  majority  of  the 
employees,  and  careful  study  will  have  to 
be  given  to  the  calibre  of  work,  i.e., 
whether  skilled,  unskilled  or  semi-skilled, 
and  schemes  must  be  thought  out  which 
will  fit  in  with  all  the  conditions  obtain- 
ing in  any  works.  As  a  matter  of  fact 
very  few  co-partnership  schemes  have 
been  found  to  be  successful,  and  those  that 
have  been  have  been  governed  by  special 
circumstances,  as  in  the  case  of  the  Port 
Sunliffht  Works.  The  trade  unions  mav 
be  taken  for  granted  as  opposing — at  least 
at  first — any  scheme  of  co-partnership, 
because  it  would  seem  that  their  attitude 
does  not  aim  at  efficiency  and  increased 
production  on  the  part  of  their  members. 


Labor   More   Than   a   Tool 

Further,  capital  must  be  educated  to 
understand  and  to  admit  that  labor  is 
something  more  than  merely  its  paid  tool; 
and  it  must  also  be  recognized  that  capi- 
tal, as  represented  by  a  large  body  of 
shareholders,  is  no  longer  any  more  of  a 
partner  in  production  than  is  labor,  but 
is  merely  an  investor,  or,  in  other  words, 
a  money  lender.  Capital,  as  such,  is  de- 
pendent on  labor  and  management  for 
its  results,  and  has  no  right  under  present 
day  conditions  to  allocate  to  itself  all  the 
gain  that  may  accrue  from  intelligent  and 
shrewd  management  and  efficient  labor. 
Whole-hearted  loyalty  in  the  efficient  pro- 
duction of  his  work  by  the  intelligent  and 
industrious  worker  can  never  be  obtained 
from  the  mere  drawer  of  wages.  It  is 
equally  necessary  that  labor  be  educated 
in  connection  with  its  new  responsibilities 
in  relation  to  a  sound  co-partnership 
scheme  which  is  based  on  business  prin- 
ciples and  not  on  philanthropy.  No 
profit-sharing  scheme  will  be  of  any  use 
if  the  workman  does  not  feel  that  he  is 
interested  in  the  losses  of  the  business  as 
well  as  the  profits. 

No  co-partnership  scheme  can  hope  for 
success  which  attempts  to  interfere  with 
standard  wages.  The  latter  must  in  all 
cases  be  at  least  as  high  as  they  would 


WOMEN   BUILDING   AEROPLANE   WINGS   IN   A    BRITISH   FACTORY. 

Illustration.  Courtesy  Engineering. 


but  it  may  be  well  that,  if  a  proposal  is 
made,  which  is  manifestly  an  honest  at- 
tempt to  improve  the  status  and  earning 
capacity  of  the  workman,  by  dividing 
fairly  with  him  the  products  of  his  labor, 
the  whole  view  of  trade  unionism  may 
change  in  regard  to  this  question  after  it 
has  been  convinced  that  the  proposal  is 
genuinely  in  the  actual  interests  of  capi- 
tal  and   labor. 


be  in  works  where  ordinary  conditions 
prevail,  whilst  alterations  must  only  fol- 
low the  customs  and  necessities  of  the 
trades,  so  that  the  co-partners  may  re- 
ceive real  pecuniary  benefits  promised, 
which  is  their  full  share  of  the  profits  over 
and  above  the  standard  wages  of  the  dis- 
trict. On  the  other  hand,  if  there  be  no 
profits,  the  partners  will  receive  nothing 
but  their  wages. 


266 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


MANAGEMENT     EFFICIENCY     AND 

CAPACITY    LOSSES 

By  O.  C. 

AN  interesting  method  of  forcing  upon 
the  notice  of  managements  the  losses  oc- 
casioned by  working  plant  at  less  than 
full  capacity  has  recently  been  evolved 
in  one  industrial  concern  and  it  consists 
of  a  monthly  chart,  upon  which  is  mark- 


much  as  it  takes  away  from  available 
assets.  For  instance,  if  a  machine 
costs  $500,  the  interest  on  that  money, 
say  at  5  per  cent,  per  annum,  is  loat: 
then  there  are  taxes  on  the  machine  at 
say  2  per  cent.,  and  insurance  at  1  per 
cent.  Further  the  machine  probably  de- 
preciates at  a  rate  of  20  per  cent,  per 
annum,    and    perhaps    $25    per    year    or 


WOMEN   WORKERS  MAKING  CORES   IN   A  FOUNDRY. 

Illustration.  Courtesy  Eng 


ed  dJagramatically  the  percentage  of 
maximum  output  achieved  in  each  de- 
partment, with  a  series  of  columns  for 
inscribing  the  total  cost  to  the  firm  of 
the  idle  plant  and  for  allocating  that 
cost  under  the  several  heads  of  lack  of 
orders,  lack  of  material,  bad  material, 
breakdowns  and  poor  planning.  The 
Tegular  presentation  of  such  a  chart 
constitutes  a  recurrent  challentre  to  the 
management.  If  the  cause  of  particular 
or  general  idleness  of  plant  is  lack  of 
orders,  either  the  sellins  department  is 
at  fault,  and  needs  waking  up,  or  the 
plant  is  larger  than  it  should  be,  and 
the  excess  should  be  disposed  or  distri- 
buted  to  better  advantage. 

If  heavy  losses  appear  as  due  to  lack 
of  labor,  their  magnitude  will  indicate 
the  amount  of  effort  to  be  directed  to- 
wards remedying  that  deficiency.  If 
lack  of  material  is  the  assigned  cause  of 
undue  expense,  something  is  wrong  at 
the  purchasing  end  or  in  the  material 
store.  If  in  any  case  the  expense  of 
idleness  is  greater  than  can  be  attri- 
buted to  all  these  causes  together,  then 
the  balance  must  go  down  to  bad  plan- 
ning or  defective  management  in  gen- 
eral. It  may  be  said  that  any  manager 
worthy  of  the  name  knows  without  tell- 
ing what  plant  is  standing  idle,  and 
why;  but  it  is  very  easy  for  a  busy  man- 
ager to  overlook  the  fact  and  the  signi- 
ficance of  idle  plant,  until  something 
happens  to  bring  it  sharply  under  his 
notice,  and  very  few  managers  have  any 
but  the  vaguest  notion  of  the  actual  cost 
in  cash  incurred  when  machinery  is  not 
working  at  its  full  capacity. 

The  data  used  in  constructing  the  chart 
is  Vised  on  the  fact  that  simple  owner- 
ship   of    a    machine    costs    money,    inas- 


more  must  be  paid  for  the  rent  of  the 
space  it  occupies.  All  these  expenses, 
say  $100,  go  on  whether  the  machine  is 
used  or  not.  Thus  the  simple  fact  of 
having  bought  this  machine  and  kept 
it  takes  from  the  firm's  assets  practical- 
ly 25  cents  a  day.  The  chart  gives  an 
indication  of  the  efficiency  of  the  man- 
agement as  distinct  from  the  efficiency 
of  the  workmen. 

Charts  of  this  nature  cannot  but  have 
a  very  educational  influence  on  the  man- 
agers of  those  plants.  They  show  that 
idle  machinery  which  cannot  be  used 
should  be  disposed  of,  and  the  money 
received  and  the  space  occupied  put  to 
some  useful  purpose.  In  several  cases 
the  issue  of  the  first  of  such  charts  re- 
sulted in  the  scrapping  of  machinery 
which  had  been  idle  for  years.  The  space 
thus  saved  was  used  for  a  purpose  for 
which  the  superintendent  had  felt  need- 
ed a  new  building.  In  another  case  it 
resulted  in  the  renting  of  temporarily 
idle  machinery  at  a  rate  which  went  far 
towards  covering  the  expense  of  carry- 
ing that  machinerj'. 

@^ 

METRIC   SYSTEM   PROS   AND   CON 

THE  persistency  with  which  pro-metric 
enthusiasts  advocate  the  adoption  of 
that  system  throughout  the  world  is  apt 
to  be  overlooked  or  not  recognized  by 
the  great  body  of  engineering  manu- 
facturers who,  because  of  the  fact  that 
such  a  change  would  affect  them  finan- 
ciallv  in  a  markedly  adverse  degree, 
should  be  fully  aware  of  just  what  such 
a  revolution  would  mean  to  them,  ne- 
cessitating a  re-education  of  the  rising 
and   risen   generation   of   technical    men. 


Mr.  W.  R.  Ingalls,  president  of  the 
American  Society  of  Weights  and  Mea- 
sures, recently  submitted  a  paper  to  the 
Institution  of  Mining  and  Metallurgy 
in  London,  entitled  "Shall  Great  Brit- 
ain and  the  United  States  adopt  the 
Metric  System?" 

The  author,  who  is  also  editor  of  the 
Engineering  and  Mining  Journal,  and 
president  of  the  Mining  and  Metallurg- 
ical Society  of  America,  said  the  sub- 
ject was  of  vastly  greater  importance 
than  was  commonly  comprehended 
and  the  people  of  Great  Britain,  her  col- 
onies and  the  United  States  should  be 
'  roused  to  the  importance  of  preserv- 
ing their  interests. 

Metric  Not  the  Only  Decimal  System. 

The  advantages  of  the  decimal  system 
are  so  manifest  in  many  cases  that  the 
pro-metric  party  is  wont  to  cloud  the 
issue  by  making  it  appear  as  if  the 
metric  system  were  the  only  decimal 
■system,  Really,  there  is  the  fundament- 
al difference  that  the  decimal  system  per 
se  is  merely  arithmeic,  while  the  metric 
system  involves  the  basic  units  of 
weights  and  measures.  Another  source 
of  confusion  will  be  dispelled  if  we  can 
eradicate  the  chimerical  idea  of  estab- 
lishing uniformity.  From  a  project  that 
would  manifestly  put  the  weights  and 
measures  of  the  greatest  industrial  na- 
tions of  the  world  at  sixes  and  sevens 
it  must  be  evident  that  the  result  would 
be  more  discord  instead  of  more  uni- 
formity. The  substitution  of  metric 
weights  for  English  weights  would 
create  relatively  light  disturbance.  Of 
course,  the  changing  of  all  our  weighing 
scales  would  cost  a  huge  sum,  and  the 
recalculation  of  schedules — such  as  rail- 
way rates — -must  come  to  something, 
like  the  ransom  of  an  empire,  but  after 
these  were  done,  we  might  get  on  pret- 
ty well. 

Let  us  consider  the  conditions  that 
have  been  established  in  the  railway 
business.  The  tracks  are  marked  with 
mile  posts.  The  railway  gauge  is  4  ft. 
SVz  in.  We  might  in  course  of  time 
get  in  the  habit  of  thinking  of  the  latter 
as  1,435  mm.,  but  manifestly  it  would 
never  be  convenient  to  refer  to  the  mile 
posts  as  being  1.609.35  km.  apart,  and 
either  we  should  have  to  continue  to 
think  of  miles,  or  else  pull  up  the  posts 
and  replant  them  at  km.  intervals, 
which  would  be  something  of  a  job.  In- 
cidentally, our  posting  of  highways 
would  have  to  be  revised,  and  the  auto- 
mobilist  would  mourn  the  day  when 
metric  legislation  was  enacted. 

Question  of  Gauges  and  Standards 

In  machine  shops  the  measures  would 
be  done  with  the  aid  of  standard  gages, 
conforming  to  the  requirements  of  prac- 
tice and  convention.  These  gages  are 
based  on  the  inch.  If  the  metric  system 
were  made  compulsory,  it  is  obvious  that 
there  would  be  but  two  alternatives,  viz., 
to  restamp  the  gages  with  strange  and 
unhandy  figures,  and  wait  until  people 
became  accustomed  to  them  as,  for  ex- 
ample, to  ask  for  a  6.35  mm.  rod  when 
they  wanted  a  1-4  in.  rod;  or  else  to 
change  the  standards  so  as  to  make  them 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  D I A  N    MACHINERY 


267 


conform  to  metric  units.  Either  horn  of 
the  dilemma  is  bad,  but  the  second  one — 
the  changing  of  gages — would  be  calami- 
tous. Some  large  .\merican  manufac- 
turers have  estimated  that  such  a  change 
would  cost  them  individually  from  $500,- 
000  to  $750,000.  So  it  is  wi'th  all  our  af- 
fairs. Our  entire  system  of  manufac- 
turing, of  building  and  of  doing  things 
is  based  on  standard  units,  which  can- 
not be  changed  except  under  conditions 
tha^  would  mean  nothing  less  than  cal- 
amity. 

Does  anybody  imagine  that  a  2x4-in. 
joist  could  be  anything  else  but  a  2x4, 
although  it  might  be  called  a  50.8x101.6 
mm.;  and  after  we  were  given  specifica- 
tions in  metric  measures,  should  we  not 
have  to  translate  them  back  into  Eng- 
lish measures,  in  order  to  make  use  of 
our  tables  of  board  measure  for  easy 
computation  ?  Of  course,  we  all  know 
that  a  2x4  is  seldom  of  those  exact  di- 
mensions, and  we  should  probably  call 
it  a  50x100  mm.  after  we  had  learned 
the  rules  of  the  new  game.  But  some- 
times it  is  necessary  to  figure  closely  in 
connection  with  joists  S4S,  and  then  we 
know  that  the  2x4  is  reduced  to  l%x3% 
in.  How  we  should  conveniently  arrive 
at  the  exact  dimensions  of  a  nominal 
50x100  mm.  joist  deponent  sayeth  not. 
Benefits  Not  Commensurate  With  Incon- 
venience 

Any  change  of  standards  in  either 
metric  or  non-metric  countries  is  prepos- 
terous, unthinkable.  We  have  all  gone 
too  far.  Besides  the  colossal  expense  of 
substituting  gauges  the  result  could  not 
be  anything  but  a  mixture.  The  man 
who  needed  some  %-in.  bolts  for  the  re- 
pair of  his  automobile  would  not  relish 
the  information  that  they  were  no  longer 
made,  but  that  he  could  have  10  mm.  or 
15  mm.  bolts. 

Non-Metric  Tables 

We  have  volumes  of  tables  of  figures 
devoted  to  the  properties  of  structural 
steel.  Similarly  as  to  mechanics,  hy- 
draulics, surveying  in  brief  all  the 
branches  of  engineering.  With  the  met- 
ric system  these  would  be  all  but  use- 
less. The  compulsory  adoption  of  the 
metric  system  would  be  no  less  prepos- 
terous than  an  edict  that  after  a  certain 
date  all  business  in  the  United  States — 
all  buying  and  selling,  all  engineering, 
all  figures — would  be  illegal  unless  done 
in  French. 

English  Foot  Greatest  World  Standard 
The  prime  argument  advanced  for  the 
metric  system  is  to  have  international 
uniformity.  It  is  stated  that  a  long 
•list  of  the  countries  of  the  world  have 
adopted  the  metric  system,  only  the 
United  States,  Great  Britain  and  her 
Colonies,  and  Russia  (of  the  Indo-Euro- 
pean nations)  having  failed  to  do  so.  I 
have  emphasized  the  words  only  and  Col- 
onies, for  therein  is  concealed  the  spe- 
ciousness  of  this  argument.  If  with 
"Colonies"  we  equate  Canada,  Australia, 
New  Zealand,  Tasmania  and  South 
Africa,  we  have  a  longer  list  of  non- 
metric  countries,  and  it  comprises  not 
only  the  most  populous,  but  also  the 
most  industrial  nations  of  the  world.  A 
con-ect  statement  of  this  theorem  would 


be:  Considering  the  Indo-European  race 
alone,  there  is  a  much  larger  population 
that  does  not  use  the  metric  system  than 
does;  and  their  nations  are  far  superior 
in  industrial  development,  measured  by 
iron  production,  let  us  say,  to  all  other 
nations  combined.  The  foisting  of  the 
metric  system  upon  them  would  be, 
therefore,  like  letting  the  tail  wag  the 
dog. 

If  uniformity  be  the  objective,  it  would 
be  better  to  institute  a  propaganda  to  in- 
duce Germany,  France,  and  the  Latin 
countries  to  adopt  the  English  system. 
In  this  connection  is  may  be  remarked 
that,  although  Russia  has  a  system  dif- 
ferent from  either,  the  fundamental 
Russian  measure  of  length,  which  is  the 
most  important  of  all  measures,  is  the 
foot,  and  the  Russian  foot  is  the  same  as 
the  English. 

Present  Tendency  Toward  Uniformity 

Another  argument  on  the  ground  of 
uniformity  relates  to  the  confusion  exi>'.- 
ing  in  the  English  system  owing  to  the 
different  kinds  of  tons,  pounds,  gallons, 
etc.  That  there  is  such  confusion,  with 
its  inherent  dangers,  is  true;  but  it  is 
also  true  that  the  confusion  is  much  less 
now  than  it  was  twenty  years  ago,  that 
it  is  bound  to  experience  further  reduc- 
tion, and  that  it  may  be  eliminated  en- 
tirely in  a  way  far  easier  than  by  the  in- 
troduction of  the  metric  system.  In 
Great  Britain  there  is  but  one  kind  of 
ton,  viz.,  that  of  2,240  lbs.  In  the  United 
States  the  English,  or  long  ton,  is  em- 
ployed to  far  less  extent  than  formerly, 
and  in  the  main  we  have  standardized  the 
ton  of  2,000  lbs.  That  we  should  have 
two  pounds — the  avoirdupois  and  the 
troy — is  annoying,  but  the  annoyance  h 
now  more   academic   than   practical,   for 


metric  Germany,  and  the  quintals  and 
metric-quintals  of  Chile,  than  I  have  over 
the  pounds  of  England  and  America  and 
the  poods  of  Russia. 

The  third  metric  argument  is  the  ease 
of  the  calculations,  especially  the  cor- 
relation among  measures  of  length,  vol- 
ume and  weight.  It  may  freely  be  ad- 
mitted that  there  is  some  merit  in  this, 
but  the  English  system  is  not  quite  help- 
less in  this  respect;  and  the  superior 
merit  of  the  metric  system  is  far  short  of 
being  a  determining  factor,  quite  apart 
from  its  calamitous  effect  in  overthrow- 
ing existing  standards  and  upsetting  the 
mode  of  thought  of  the  people,  which,  of 
course,  are  the  major  considerations. 

© 

HEAT  TREATMENT  OF  STEEL 
FORGINGS 

By  T.  E. 
HEAVY  steel  forgings  are  supposed  to 
undergo  a  "normalizing"  heat  process 
after  suffering  the  drastic  treatment  in- 
volved in  'bringing  them  to  the  desired 
shape;  but  in  fact  the  annualing  temper- 
atures to  which  they  are  subjected  vary 
greatly,  being  as  low  as  650  deg.  C, 
and  in  others  as  high  as  927  deg.  C, 
and  the  results  obtained  from  the  forg- 
ing naturally  vary  accordingly.  Some 
authorities  question  these  temperatures 
and  one  is  told  that  there  is  little  need 
to  trouble,  as  the  forgings  as  a  rule  pass 
test,  but  unfortunately  forgings,  ma- 
chine parts  of  all  descriptions,  break 
down  prematurely,  due  to  fatigue,  and 
it  is  possible  to  locate  fatigue  failures  at 
the  manufacturer's  works  before  such 
forgings  are  put  into  service. 

Unless  the  critical  tempera+ure  of  6.50 
deg.   C,  is  exceeded   comparatively  little 


TUBING   A  MARINE   ENGINE  CONDENSER. 

Illustration,  Courtesy  Enpineering. 


the  troy  pound  is  seldom  used.  Similarly 
have  the  differences  among  gallons, 
bushels,  etc.,  lapsed  in  the  main  into  in- 
nocuous desuetude.  But  with  respect  to 
confusion,  the  skirts  of  the  metric  sys- 
tem are  not  clean.  As  a  statistician  of 
nearly  thirty  years'  experience  I  may  say 
that  I  have  fallen  into  more  errors  over 
the     zentners     and     doppel-zentners     of 


change  is  effected  in  the  structural  con- 
dition. A  forging  which  has  been  fin- 
ished at  a  high  temperature,  or  parts 
which  have  been  raised  to  a  forging 
heat  and  have  received  little  or  no  .sub^ 
sequent  work,  on  cooling  retain  a  verv 
coarse  structure.  As  an  example  of 
what  may  occur  if  such  forgings  are  not 
properly  annealed  it  may  be   mentioned 


268 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


that  quite  recently  a  double  intermediate 
shaft  actually  cracked  in  the  lathe  dur- 
ing the  turning  operation.  The  shaft  in 
question  was  cut  through  the  defective 
area  and  subjected  to  microscopic  ex- 
ination,  which  revealed  a  structui'al  con- 
dition not  unlike  that  of  an  unannealed 
steel   casting.     The  shaft  was  then   sub- 


tural  condition.  This  is  entirely  wrong, 
and  if  it  is  desired  to  obtain  the  best 
normal  structural  condition,  the  heat  in 
such  forgings  must  be  allowed  first  to 
fall  below  its  recalescence  temperature 
and  then  reheated  somewhat  above  its 
calescence  temperature,  and  preferably 
cooled  in  air. 


CONSTRUCTING  AEROPLANE  NOSES  WITH  WOMEN   WORKERS. 

Illustration,  Courtesy  Engineering. 


jected  to  a  prescribed  heat  treatment, 
after  which  it  was  again  examined,  and 
showed  the  entirely  different  structure 
of  a  properly  annealed  forging  with 
nearly  double  the  elongation,  whilst 
physical  tests  showed  more  than  double 
the  area  of  reduction  and  bending  angle 
than  were  shown  by  the  metal  in  its 
badly  annealed  condition.  Such  cases 
of  inadequate  annealing  are  found  not 
only  in  large  forgings  but  equally  the  , 
whole  way  down  the  scale,  even  to  drop 
stampings. 

As  an  example  of  the  same  thing  in 
smaller  forgings  a  case  may  be  men- 
tioned -of  a  heavy  bolt  which  was  of  a 
special  type  and  made  by  heating  to 
forging  temperature  for  the  full  length 
pieces  of  round  bars  and  "upsetting"  a 
portion  at  one  end  to  form  the  head. 
These  forgings  were  subsequently  nor- 
malized in  heat  at  677  deg.  C,  but  when 
they  were  subjected  to  a  shock,  it  was 
by  no  means  uncommon  for  the  head 
to  come  off.  The  reason  for  this  will 
be  readily  understood  when  one  exam- 
ines what  had  taken  place  in  the  forg- 
ing operation;  the  only  portion  whidi 
had  received  any  work  was  the  material 
forming  the  head,  and  where  this  ad- 
joined the  body  one  had  two  entirely 
different  structures.  After  these  forg- 
ings received  a  proper  heat  treatment  a 
uniformity  in  structure  was  obtained 
together  with  the  disappearance  of  any 
further  shelling  of  the  head  when  sub- 
jected to  the  same  repeated  shock  stress. 

A  misconception  more  or  less  common 
in  heat  treatment  of  steels  is  that  full 
advantage  can  be  taken  of  the  initial 
forging  heat,  and  that  forgings  or 
s^^^ampings  finished  at  a  high  tempera- 
ture will  on  cooling  regain  a  fine  struc- 


DEVELOPMENTS  IN   HEATING  AND 
BOILER   FURNACES 

By  D.  Street. 

A  GOOD  deal  of  attention  is  being  di- 
rected at  the  present  time  to  the  secur- 
ing of  fuel  economy  in  reheating  fur- 
naces at  steel  works  and  for  the  elimin- 
ation of  smoke  from  their  operation. 
For  the  secondary  reheating  of  some 
slabs,  blooms  and  billets  some  four-^or 
five  times  more  fuel  is  required  than  for 
the  preparation  of  an  ingot  from  hot- 
open-hearth  steel,  and  the  operation,  in 
the  case  of  large  steel  works,  affords 
scope  for  some  very  considerable  sav- 
ing. By-pro<luct  gas  from  blast  furnaces 
and  coke  ovens  is  coming  into  increas- 
ing use  for  the  purpose;  producer  gas 
is  in  some  oases  being  substituted  for 
coal;  and  experiments  are  going  for- 
ward in  some  quarters  with  tar  and 
powdered  coal  as  fuel  and  with  crude 
oil. 

Even  where  there  is  no  departure 
from  the  use  of  coal  for  heating  the 
furnaces  much  experimental  work  is  be- 
ing done  vdth  mechanical  stokers,  with 
a  view  to  securing  economical  heating 
and  smokelessness.  At  one  of  the  Car- 
negie works  a  great  improvement  has 
been  made  by  substituting  air  for  water 
as  the  cooling  medium  for  the  pipes  of 
a  flat-roofed  continuous  furnace  and  car- 
rying the  heated  steam  to  the  combus- 
tion chamber.  The  cooling  of  the  roof, 
though  much  reduced,  is  still  sufficient, 
and  the  pre-heated  chamber  for  com- 
bustion  is  a   great    advantage. 

The  performances  of  different  heating 
furnaces  as  recorded  over  the  past  five 
years  at  another  works  have  yielded 
some  very  interesting  data.     With  coa! 


fuel  the  efficiency  of  the  furnaces  (per- 
centage of  heat  in  fuel  actually  absorb- 
ed by  the  steel)  ranged  between  13  and 
15  per  cent.;  with  natural  gas  average 
efficiencies  of  20,  27,  35,  40  and  42  per 
cent.,  were  obtained;  and  there  were  in- 
dividual furnaces  that  averaged  month 
in  and  month  out  between  60  and  70 
per  cent.  At  Clairton,  near  Pittsburg, 
Pa.,  the  Carnegie  Steel  Company  is  now 
building  what  will  be  the  largest  plant 
of  by-product  ovens  in  the  world,  pro- 
ducing 65,000,000  cubic  feet  of  surplus 
gas  per  day.  This  will  be  used  for  fur- 
nace heating,  and  will  give  the  equival- 
ent of  1,600  tons  of  coal  per  day.  Coke- 
oven  gas,  after  being  scrubbed  and 
freed  of  its  tar  and  light-oil  vapors  is 
a  clean  fuel,  and  can  be  burtied  more 
easily  without  smoke  than  either  raw 
coal  or  any  other  gas  and  will  furnish 
a  higher  surface  temperature  than  pro- 
ducer gas.  Where  producer  gas  is  used 
for  heating  billets  or  small  slabs  in  the 
continuous  type  of  furnace,  two  points 
in  particular  have  to  be  watched — the 
gas  must  be  supplied  regularly  to  the 
furnace,  and  air  must  be  supplied  at  a 
high  temperature. 

If  hand-fired,  hand-poked  producers 
are  used,  the  gas  goes  to  the  furnace 
irregularly,  and  at  times  there  will  be 
a  large  surplus  of  gas  which  chokes  the 
furnace  and  makes  excessive  smoke. 
These  defects  are  overcome  by  using  a 
modem-type  mechanically-fired  and  me- 
chanically-poked producer;  and  if  the 
secondary  air  be  sufficiently  pre-heated, 
quick  and  complete  combustion  is  se- 
cured in  the  furnace.  There  are  regen- 
erative types  of  continuous  heating  fur- 
naces, in  which  the  air  is  preheated  to 
1,000  or  1,200  deg.  Fahr.,  and  in  these 
all  combustion  takes  place  in  the  first 
third  of  the  furnace,  the  remaining  two- 
thirds  being  almost  as  clear  as  the  out- 
side air.  Under  such  conditions  there 
is,  of  course  no  smoke  whatever.  The 
elimination  of  smoke  from  coal-fired 
furnaces  has  been  secured  by  applying 
to  furnace  heating  the  knowledge  gain- 
ed in  the  study  of  highly  efficient  boiler 
firing.  Mechanical  under-feed  stokers 
are  used  in  conjunction  with  forced 
draught,  and  furnaces  70  ft.  long  by  20 
ft.  -ttiide  are  (being  operated  by  these 
means  without  smoke.  In  records  taken 
of  five  plate-heating  furnaces  and  two 
billet-heating  furnaces  equipped  with 
underfeed  stokers,  all  of  which  were 
practically  smokeless  some  facts  were 
gleaned  of  interest. 

From  the  billet  furnaces  about  three 
tons  per  hour  were  obtained.  These  fur- 
naces were  26  ft.  long  by  7  ft.  wide. 
The  five  plate  furnaces  averaged  18  ft. 
by  7  ft.  hearth  surface,  and  were  used 
for  heating  plates  and  shapes  such  as 
were  required  in  car  construction.  Smoke 
rarely  issued  from  the  chimney  stacks 
of  those  seven  furnaces  for  more  than 
five  minutes  at  a  time,  and  that  very 
rarely,  and  a  uniform  temperature  of 
2,300   deg.   F.,   is   possible   at  all   times. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


269 


The  constitution  of  industrial  enterprise  is  largely  depart- 
mental— "spokes  ni  a  wheel."  This  series  of  articles  has  for  its 
object  the  featuring  in  a  racy,  interesting  and  instructive  fash- 
ion, the  training,  experience  and  achievement  of  those  who 
to-day  are  transmitting,  effectively,  energy  in  their  capacity  as 
'spokes  in  the  wheels"   of  our  metal-working  establishments. 


CHAS.   W.   A.   MOORE. 

THE  successful  achievement  that 
Canadian  manufactures  have  at- 
tained in  the  production  of  all 
classes  of  munitions,  would  never  have 
been  possible  but  for  the  able  co-opera- 
tion of  the  machine  tool  builder,  and 
those  associated  with  that  branch  of  the 
industry  that  supplies  the  link  between 
the  producer  and  the  consumer;  namely, 
the  distributors  or  machine  tool  agencies. 
Prominen  among:  those  whose  efforts 
have  been  a  pillar  of  support  to  many 
shell  plant  executives,  and  upon  whom 
much  reliance  has  been  placed  for  the  se- 
lection of  suitable  equipment,  has  been 
the  subject  of  this  sketch,  Charles  W.  A. 
Moore,  assistant  manager  of  Foss  & 
Hill  Machinery  Co.,  of  Montreal,  Que. 

Charlie,  as  he  is  generally  called  by 
his  more  intimate  friends,  is  a  Canadian 
by  birth,  having  been  born  at  Toronto, 
Ontario,  on  Oct.  .17,  1880,  of  Irish-Cana 
dian  parentage.  When  Charles  was  only 
two  years  old  the  family  removed  tc 
Lachute,  where  the  boy  received'  his  ear- 
ly training,  and  what  little  education 
he  could  acquire  when  not  at  work  on  the 
farm.  At  the  age  of  sixteen,  our  "Spoke" 
started  on  his  engineering  career,  enter- 
ing the  plant  of  the  Canadian  Linotype 
Co.,  of  Montreal,  as  an  apprentice  ma- 
chinist. After  serving  most  of  his  time 
with  this  firm,  he  engaged  himself  as  an 
improver  with  James  Cooper,  machinist; 
Cooper's  shop,  at  that  time,  making  the 
machinery  required  for  the  Canadian 
trade  of  the  Ingersoll-Rand  Co.  From 
this  time  until  the  year  1906,  he  was  em- 
ployed in  various  capacities  with  differ- 
ent engineering  firms  in  Montreal  and 
vicinity.  For  the  next  three  years  he 
was  foreman  at  the  Allis-Chalmers-Bul- 
lock  plant,  following  which  he  accepted 
the  position  of  superintendent  of  the  In- 
ternational Steel  Co.,  of  Montreal.  In 
1911,  he  went  with  the  Canadian  Buffalo 
Forge  Co.  as  superintendent,  remaining 
there  until  1913,  afterwards  becoming 
associated,  in  a  similar  capacity,  with 
the  Hall  Engineering  Co.,  of  Montreal. 
In  1915,  he  accepted  a  position  as  sales- 
man with  the  Foss  &  Hill  Machinery  Co., 


and  his  present  position  is  ample  proof 
of  his  ability  and  success  in  the  selling 
end. 

In  1906,  Mr.  Moore  married  Maud 
Earle,  daughter  of  the  late  William 
James    Earle,   of   Valleyfield,   P.Q.     The 


CHAS.   W.   A.   MOORE. 

union  having  been  blessed  with  four 
children,  two  daughters  and  one  son 
living,  and  one  son  deceased. 

The  activities  of  the  past  few  years  have 
confined  our  "Spoke"  closely  to  his  task 
and  little  opportunity  has  been  available 
for  relaxation.  Hours  of  recreation,  how- 
ever, are  necessary,  and  these  are  gener- 
ally spent  in  lawn  bowling,  he  being  an 
ardent  supporter  of  the  Outremont  Bowl- 
ing Club.  Mr.  Moore  is  a  member  of  the 
A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  and  although  his  business 
activities  occupy  the  greater  portion  of 
his  time,  he  still  finds  it  possible  to  take 
an  active  interest  in  the  Ancient  Craft, 
and  is  associated  with  the  Blue,  the  Chap- 
ter, the  Preceptory  and  the  Shrine. 
Mr.  Moore  attributes  much  of  his  suc- 


cess to  the  fact  that  he  has  devoted  con- 
siderable time  to  study.  "Unless  a  young 
man  endeavors  to  acquire  a  wider  knowl- 
edge than  that  of  actual  contact  with  his 
daily  labor,  he  must  of  necessity  drift 
along  with  the  tide;  the  great  need  of  the 
present  day  is  for  men  who  are  not  only 
capable  of  successfully  accomplishing 
what  is  required  of  them,  but  who  are 
willing  (by  hard  work)  to  cultivate  that 
faculty  of  observation  and  application, 
that  will  better  fit  them  for  the  larger 
opportunities  that  arise  daily.  They 
should  keep  in  close  touch  with  their 
particular  line  of  business,  making  them- 
selves conversant  by  practical  observa- 
tion or  by  published  m-ediums,  of  the 
many  developments  that  are  continual- 
ly taking  place  throughout  the  trade. 
Big  things  are  only  possible  by  those  who 
are  ready  to  accept  and  able  to  fulfil  the 
larger  responsibilities." 

© 

DEVELOP  BRITISH  MINES 

THE  development  of  the  mineral  re 
sources  of  Great  Britain  and  Ireland,  now 
being  undertaken  by  a  department  of 
the  Ministry  of  Munitions,  under  the  di- 
rection of  Sir  Lionel  Phillips,  is  likely  to 
lead  to  far-reaching  results.  Sir  Lionel 
Phillips  is  well  known  for  his  life's  work 
in  developing  the  mineral  resources  of 
South  Africa,  and  is  bringing  his  knowl- 
edge and  experience  to  his  task.  A  num- 
ber of  engineers  of  outstanding  ability 
and  position  are  also  assisting  the  efforts 
of  the  department,  and  already  consid- 
erable work  has  been  done  in  furthering 
war  purposes. 

Control  Wolfram  Mines 

Steps  are  being  taken  to  control  and 
expand  wolfram  mines,  from  which  it  is 
expected  to  produce  a  home  supply  of 
tungsten  powder,  an  essential  ingredient 
in  the  manufacture  of  high-speed  steel. 
A  complete  survey  of  the  lead  resources 
of  the  country  is  also  being  carried  out; 
new  sources  of  supply  being  investigat- 
ed and  old  working  reopened.  In  one  in- 
stance steps  have  been  taken  to  assist  in 
the  drainage  and  development  of  an  im- 
portant lead  mine  from  which  there  is  a 
prospect  of  an  immediate  increased  out- 
put. 

Other  Developments 

Action  is  also  being  taken  with  regard 
to  the  production  of  zinc.  A  sulphur 
pyrites  mine  has  been  acquired,  and  cer- 
tain low-grade  copper  deposits  of  con- 
siderable extent  and  promise  are  being 
carefully  watched  with  a  view  to  giving 
assistance  in  their  working. 

In  the  course  of  its  immediate  opera- 
tions the  department  is  gaining  valuable 
information  which  will  allow  it  to  offer 
future  suggestions  as  to  the  prospect  of 
the  normal  base  metal  industry  of  the 
United  Kingdom.  It  will  also  be  enabled 
to  report  on  the  relative  cost  of  home 
production  against  importation,  and  to 
advise  as  to  the  placing  of  the  industry 
in  the  best  position  to  meet  emergencies. 

@ 

William  H.  Cunningham,  a  member  of 
the  firm  of  Kurtz  Bros.,  bankers,  Phila- 
delphia. Pa.,  has  been  elected  president 
of  the  Lake  Superior  Corporation,  Sault 
Ste.  Marie,  Ont. 


Volume  XVIII. 


Influence  of  RecentDevelopments  on  Apprenticeship  Training 

By  Neil  J.   Maclean 

The  apprenticeship  question  is  a  live  issue  in  British  Industrial  circles  at  all  times,  and 
ichile  it  has  long  been  a  subject  of  controversy  between  employers  and  employees,  indications 
abound,  in  view  of  the  utterances  of  numerous  important  officials,  that  the  apprentice  of  the 
future  will  he  trained  and  appreciated  as  an  essential  factor  totvards  national  industrial  suc- 
cess.    Plans  for  future  activity  in  Canada  m>i,st  include  a  consideration  of  this  subject. 


AMONG  the  many  problems  con- 
nected with  the  engineering  in- 
dustry upon  which  experience 
gained  during  the  war  has  shed  fresh 
light,  is  that  of  the  workshop  training 
of  apprentices,  and  with  a  view  to  pro- 
moting a  clearer  understanding  of  its 
different  aspects  I  set  forth  my  views 
below  in  a  series  of  axioms,  supported 
by  some  notes  on  the  application  of 
these  axioms  to  a  system  of  apprentice 
training,  as  worked  out  in  detail  in  the 
factory  with  which  I  am  connected.  The 
more  advanced  training,  which  should 
include  a  university  engineering  course, 
is  not  dealt  with,  .as  this  must  necessar- 
ily be  planned  on  different  lines  through- 
out; only  the  regular  workshop  training 
which  will  enable  a  man  to  qualify  as 
a  skilled  workman,  a  draughtsman,  or  a 
junior  shop  executive — foi'eman,  under- 
foreman,  inspector,  etc. — is  under  con- 
sideration. 

It  will  make  a  good  starting-point  in 
trying  to  sort  out  one's  thoughts  on  this 
subject,  to  remember  that  the  raw  ma- 
terial in  question,  when  we  begin  work 
with  him,  is  the  boy,  a  wayward,  un- 
stable, light-hearted,  elder  child,  a 
dreamer  of  dreams,  eager,  easily  inter- 
ested and  easily  tired;  that  during  his 
period  of  training  he  passes  through  the 
critical  point  of  development  from  boy 
to  man,  at  about  the  age  of  eighteen; 
that  we  are  dealing  with  man  in  his 
seedtime,  and,  hence,  largely  according 
to  our  sowing  so  shall  the  reaping  be; 
and  that  the  habits  that  are  formed  dur- 
ing this  period  will  have  a  determining 
influence  on  the  character  developed  dur- 
ing later  years. 

Among  the  habits  that  will  most  sure- 
ly promote  his  success  later  on  is  the 
habit  of  industry,  of  steady,  constant 
and  intelligent  labour,  and  this  brings 
me  to  the  statement  of  my  first  axiom: 
The  aprentice  must  be  always  busy.  It 
sounds  simple  and  looks  obvious,  but  in 
practice  it  is  a  condition  neither  easy  to 
bring  about  nor  to  maintain.  To  begin 
with,  the  boy  altogether  lacks  skill  and 
must  be  shown  how  to  do  his  work; 
this  occupies  the  time  and  attention  of 
a  trained  man;  work  suitable  to  his  in- 
experience must  be  found  for  him;  his 
interest  in  this  work,  easily  roused,  is 
easily  tired,  while  his  ingenuity — when 
tired  of  the  job — in  escaping  from  con- 
trol is  ever  alert  and  watchful  of  its 
opportunity.  And  yet  if,  during  his 
training,  there  are  frequent  spells  of  idle 
time,  the  habit  of  industry  has  but  a 
poor   chance   to  form   itself,   and   if  not 

•Contributed    to    a    recent   number    o£    "Engin- 
eering,"  London. 


formed  then,  permanent  harm  to  the 
boy's   character   must    sjrely    result. 

The  requirements  of  industry  are 
growing  more  exacting,  more  complex; 
there  is  more  ground  to  cover  before 
one  can  be  considered  trained,  even  in  a 
single  department  of  the  many  trades 
comprehended  within  the  term  "en- 
gineering;" for  the  apprentice  there  is, 
therefore,  much  to  learn,  a  wide  coun- 
try to  explore.  This  brings  me  to  my 
second  axiom:  The  apprentice  must  be 
always  learning..  He  must  be  taught 
to  do  a  certain  thing  properly  and  must 
then  be  moved  on  to  a  different  kind  of 
work. ,  The  thing  he  is  given  to  do  first 
must  fee  easier  to  learn  than  what  fol- 
lows. In  this  way  confidence  in  his 
ability-  to  perform  specified  tasks  will 
gradually  be  acquired,  whilst  the  range 
of  the  idiflferent  kinds  of  work  with 
which  he  is  intimately  familiar  will  be 
steely  widened.  At  the  same  time,  by 
ensuring  a  sufficient  variety  in  the  work, 
attention  and  interest  are  maintained; 
for  it  must  be  repeated  with  insistence, 
a  boy's  interest  is  easily  tired,  and  if 
lest,  mischief  is  an  inevitable  result. 

The  engineer  of  a  century  ago  was  an 
empiricist,  a  cut-and-try  man.  He  de- 
p9nded  almost  entirely  on  his  previous 
practical  experience;  he  worked  to 
sketches,  simple  drawings,  or  models.  If 
his  first  attempt  to  get  a  certain  result 
did  not  succeed,  he  felt  his  way  forward 
gropingly  by  practical  experiments  to  a 
more  successful  conclusion.  It  is  differ- 
ent to-day.  Now  he  must  appreciate  ex- 
actness in  size;  he  must  easily  read  com- 
plicated drawings;  he  must  be  able  to 
think  in  three  dimensions,  and  have  some 
knowledge  of  physics  and  chemistry; 
which  brings  me  to  my  third  axiom: 
Engineering  is  an  exact  science,  and  the 
apprentice  must  develop  the  scientific 
mind. 

I  use  the  term  "engineer"  in  its  broad- 
est sense  throughout,  not  limiting  it  to 
the  director  of  great  enterprises,  the 
executive  in  charge  of  factories,  or  the 
workman  actually  carrying  out  a  given 
task.  Of  course  the  training  given  to  a 
group  of  boys  in  anv  workshop  will  vary 
individually  to  suit  their  prospective 
positions,  but  the  fundamental  princi- 
ples are  common  to  all,  and  if  these  are 
not  understood  and  observed,  successful 
results  cannot  be  expected. 

During  apprenticeship  the  schoolboy 
of  from  fifteen  to  seventeen  years  of 
age  must  be  turned  into  a  young  man 
able  to  think  exactly,  to  observe  accur- 
ately, and  to  note  down  clearly  his  re- 
sults. He  must  develop  the  quantita- 
tive  sense,  the   ability  to   appreciate   in- 


stantly and  without  conscious  effort  the 
magnitude  of  the  quantities  he  is  at  the 
moment  dealing  with.  To  obtain  such  a 
result  the  training  must  involve  an  in- 
timate mingling  of  practical  and 
theoretical  work,  of  shop  experience  and 
study,  of  things  seen  and  done,  things 
noted  and  written  down. 

Now,  it  must  never  be  lost  sight  of 
that  since  an  apprentice  is  trained  in  a 
workshop  or  factory  whose  business  it 
is  to  make  things  for  sale,  he  is  hedged 
round  with  commercial  conditions  and 
considerations  which  may  conflict  with 
the  requirements  of  his  training.  A 
nice  balance  must  be  struck  between 
interests  which  will  not  always  or  obvi- 
ously work  together  for  a  common  end; 
and  long  views  of  what  will  ultimately 
benefit  the  firm,  or  the  trade,  or  the 
naiion,  must  be  considered  along  with 
the  more  immediate  needs  of  factory 
output  and  organisation;  in  view  of 
which  we  arrive  at  my  fourth  axiom: 
The  apprentice's  course  of  training  must 
not  be  determined  by  the  shop  foreman 
or  manager  responsible  for  output.  If 
it  is,  then  considerations  of  output  will 
weigh  too  heavily  and  the  apprentice 
will  not  get  the  variety  of  experience 
which  is  essential  to  fulfil  axioms  (2) 
and  (3).  A  member  of  the  firm  having 
authority  must  determine  the  course  of 
training  of  each  apprentice  in  detail  and 
must  ruthlessly  override'  any  objection 
to  necessary  changes  advanced  by  de- 
partment foremen  on  the  grounds  of 
interference  with  output.  This  condi- 
tion is  more  imperative  as  industry  be- 
comes specialised  and  departments  more 
highly  organised,  so  that  variety  of  ex- 
perience within  any  one  department  is 
more  and  more  curtailed. 

We  have  heard  and  read  much  re- 
cently of  the  ca'  canny  policy,  of  its 
m'staken  basis  and  its  harmful  results. 
It  is  chiefly  founded  upon  the  idea  that 
there  is  not  enough  work  to  go  round. 
The  trade  unionist  knows  that  fellow- 
mem.bers  are  out  of  work;  therefore, 
says  he,  "I  will  do  a  little  less  and 
some  of  them  will  get  a  job."  But  this 
line  of  reasoning  is  not  confined  to  the 
trade  unionist;  it  crops  up  in  other 
forms  among  other  classes.  The  edu- 
cated man  says  to  himself,  if  too  many 
highly  educated  men  are  turned  out, 
there  won't  be  enough  comfortable 
berths  for  us  all.  Ergo,  says  he,  put  the 
brake  on  the  education  wheel:  avast 
there,  turning  out  too  many  B.  Sc.'s.  I 
think  I  have  even  read  leading  articles 
in  the  engineering  journals  voicing  this 
view  in  more  polished  phrases.  Now, 
the    prinicple    on    which    this    conclusion 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


271 


is  based  has  been  thrown  on  the  scrap 
heap.  Let  us  make  sure  that  the  differ- 
ent conclusions  themselves  find  their 
way  to  the  same  well-merited  destina- 
tion; which  leads  me  to  my  fifth  axiom: 
There  cannot  be  too  many  highly  train- 
ed apprentices. 

There  must  always  be  forces  at  work 
that  will  keep  back  some  of  the  starters 
from  being  finishers;  ill-health,  family 
trouble  interfering  with  apprenticeship, 
decay  of  ambition,  these  will  interfere 
with  the  successful  completion  of  train- 
ing- courses  in  many  cases.  Against 
these,  employers  must  always  pit  all  the 
forces  and  influences  at  their  command 
to  turn  out  as  many  highly  trained, 
highly  educated  apprentices  as  they 
possibly  can,  confident  that  the  supply 
cannot  outrun  the  demand.  The  more 
that  are  turned  out,  the  more  useful 
energy  and  creative  force  has  been 
added  to  the  nation's  stock. 

The  industrial  lesson  of  the  past  two 
years  that  has  bitten  most  deeply  into 
thoughtful  minds,  I  think,  is  this — that, 
given  good  executive  direction,  high- 
class  work  can  be  turned  out  by  com- 
paratively untrained  labor.  But  the 
executives  must  be  good,  very  good. 
Now,  the  training  that  is  required  by  a 
good  engineering  executive  is  so  elabor- 
ate, thorough  and  comprehensive,  that  it 
cannot  begin  too  early,  or  be  too  care- 
fully planned  and  directed;  which  en- 
ables me  to  state  my  sixth  and  last 
axiom:  Special  training  must  be  given 
to  those  apprentices  who  show  marked 
ability. 

A  reasonable  time  after  starting  work 
must  elapse  before  selection  is  possible; 
then  some  form  of  thorough  test  .should 
be  applied  to  divide  the  apprentices 
into  those  who  can  be  expected  only 
to  turn  into  competent  workers  and 
those  who  may  one  day  take  the  lead  and 
rise  to  responsible  positions.  Opportun- 
ities of  specially  varied  training  and  of 
higher  study  in  connection  with  it  can 
then  be  provided  for  the  selected  boys, 
with  confidence  that  such  facilities  will 
not  be  wasted. 

Having  examined  some  of  the  funda- 
mental principles  that  must  underlie  any 
system  of  training  for  apprentices  to  the 
mechanical  trades  and  reduced  these  to 
simple  axiomatic  form,  it  may  be  of  in- 
terest if  their  working  out,  as  applied 
to  a  particular  factory,  is  described  in 
some  detail.  Such  a  system  of  appren- 
ticeship has  been  umlar  trial  in  the  works 
of  Barr  and  Stroud,  Limited,  Glasgow, 
for  the  past  12  years,  a  period  long 
enough  to  enable  an  opinion  to  be 
formed  of  its  results.  A  large  number 
of  apprentices  have  graduated  under  it 
and  have  proved  themselves  able  to  do 
g-ood  work  in  other  factories  in  this 
country  and  abroad,  while  the  junior 
executive  positions  throughout  the  fac- 
tory are  now  in  many  cases  filled  by 
men  trained  under  the  system. 

At  the  present  time  over  ,300  appren- 
tices are  employed,  engaged  in  all 
branches  of  the  fine  mechanical  trades, 
fitting,  machining,  tool-making,  elec- 
trical       engineering,        pattern-making, 


moulding,  joiner-work,  instrument-mak- 
ing, and  optical  prism  polishing.  Ap- 
prenticeship is  for  five  years,  commenc- 
ing at  fiftten  or  sixteen  years  of  age. 
The  boys  are  not  indentured,  but  they 
are  expected  to  spend  the  full  training 
period  with  the  firm.  No  boys  not  ap- 
prenticed are  employed. 

Considering  the  axioms  in  order,  the 
first — that  an  apprentice  must  always 
be  busy — is  not  easily  reduced  to  any 
definite  rules;  it  depends  largely  on  the 
general  atmosphere  throughout  the 
shops.  The  pratice  is  closely  followed 
that  at  each  stage  of  training,  a  boy  is 
under  the  supervision  of  a  man  expert 
in  his  own  branch  of  the  trade,  whose 
duty  it  is  definitely  to  show  the  boy  how 
to  do  the  work,  and  also  to  see  that  he 
is  kept  constantly  employed.  Where 
difficulty  is  me'  with  in  developing  in  a 
boy  a  habit  of  steady  work,  special  steps 
to  overcome  it  are  taken.  He  is  put  on 
to  work  in  which  the  day's  task  can  be 
very  exactly  measured  and  his  perform- 
ance closely  watched.  This  is  not  done 
only  in  a  disciplinary  spirit,  as  it  must 
be  clearly  recognised  that  if  a  worker 
in  the  mechanical  trades  fails  to  acquire 
habits  of  regular  industry,  he  can  never 
earn  any  useful  place  for  himself  in 
organised  industrial  work. 

The  second  axiom — that  an  apprentice 
must  always  be  learning — is  applied  by 
arranging  in  sequence  a  series  of  difl'er- 
ent  kinds  of  operations  which  he  suc- 
cessively undertakes,  commencing  with 
the  simplest.  A  change  of  work  is  ar- 
ranged for  about  once  every  six  months. 
During  the  first  half  of  apprenticeship 
the  training  for  most  of  the  trades  fol- 
lows the  same  general  lines,  including 
fitting  and  machining;  during  the  sec- 
ond half  of  the  training  each  apprentice 
specialises  in  his  own  particular  craft. 
Pattern-makers  spend  some  months  in 
the  foundry,  opticians  some  months  in 
the  machine  shop,  and  so  on.  A  spe- 
cial feature  is  made  of  the  fourth-year 
training  for  instrument-makers,  which 
is  carried  on  under  a  qualified  instruc- 
tor, the  work  consisting  as  far  as  pos- 
sible of  the  building  of  complete  instru- 
ments of  odd  types. 

The  fourth  year  of  any  system  of 
training  is,  I  think,  the  critical  period. 
It  coincides  with  that  difficult  age  when 
a  boy  is  unsettled,  whimsical,  discon- 
tented, groping  about  uncertainly  in 
search  of  the  larger  powers  and  respon- 
sibilities of  manhood.  It  often  happens, 
too,  to  be  the  time  at  home  when  the 
difficulty  which  his  parents  find  in  sup- 
porting him  at  a  comparatively  low 
wage  presses  hardest;  he  is  still  earn- 
ing little  and  the  end  of  his  training 
period  seems  a  long  way  off.  His  early 
interest  in  the  work  may  have  flagged, 
while  he  is  still  not  master  enough  of 
his  trade  to  find  pleasure  in  working  at 
it.  For  these  reasons  I  think  the  fourth- 
year  apprentice  should  receive  particu- 
lar attention.  Care  should  be  taken  to 
make  the  work  as  interesting  as  pos- 
sible, to  appeal  to  his  growing  sense  of 
craftsmanship  by  varied  and  carefully 
selected    work,    to    see    that    he    works 


under  a  wise  and  competent  guide  who 
will  watch  for  signs  of  insubordination 
and  deal  with  these  in  a  proper  and  un- 
derstanding spirit. 

The  third  axiom — that  engineering  is 
an  exact  science — is  applied  by  bringing 
all  possible  pressure  to  bear  on  the  boys 
to  attend  regularly  suitable  techhital 
classes  in  the  evenings.  As  the  day'S; 
work  does  not  begin  till  eight  o'clock 
there  is  less  objection — if,  indeed,  there 
is  any  at  all — to  the  boys  being  ex- 
pected to  study  at  night  than  in  cases 
where  the  work  starts  at  six  or  six- 
thirty.  Each  apprentice  is  interviewed 
by  the  manager  at  the  beginning  of  the 
evening  class  session,  and  the  classes  he 
decides  to  attend  are  entered  on  a  card. 
The  school  is  notified,  and  if  he  fails  to 
enrol  the  matter  is  dealt  with  as  a 
breach  of  condition  of  apprenticeship. 
An  increase  of  pay  from  6d.  to  2s.  per 
week  is  granted  for  evening  class  at- 
tendance, graduated  in  accordance  with 
the  record  of  work  done.  Early  leave  to 
attend  classes  is  arranged  for  when  nec- 
essary, and  in  no  ease  is  an  apprentice 
allowed  to  work  late  in  the  factory  on 
one  of  his  class  nights.  It  has  not  been 
found  possible  even  with  this  consider- 
able amount  of  persuasion  and  insistence 
to  induce  more  than  about  70  per  cent, 
of  the  number  of  apprentices  in  the  fac- 
tory each  year  to  attend  evening  classes 
regularly.  Sickness,  home  disabilities, 
and  temperamental  repugnance  to  any 
form  of  book-work  prove  too  great  ob- 
stacles to  the  remaining  30  per  cent. 

The  fourth  axiom — that  the  appren- 
tice's training  must  not  be  determined  by 
the  foreman — is  met  by  all  changes  of 
apprentices  from  one  stage  to  the  next 
being  arranged  for  by  the  works 
manager.  A  list  of  these  changes  is  sent 
to  the  department  foremen  about  once  a 
fortnight,  and  must  be  given  effect  to 
forthwith,  no  matter  at  what  inconveni- 
ence to  the  work  in  hand.  It  is  neces- 
sary to  be  explicit  on  this  point,  as 
otherwise  the  competent  boy  will  be 
kept  on  one  kind  of  work,  to  the  detri- 
ment of  his  all-round  training.  In  ar- 
ranging for  a  change  of  work  regard  is 
had,  of  course,  to  the  boy's  special  apti- 
tude, more  particularly  in  the  later 
sta<res  of  training;  and  there  is  no  ob- 
jection to  the  foreman  giving  boys  spe- 
cial experience  of  particular  machines  or 
processes  when  opportunity  offers,  with- 
out receiving  instructions  to  do  so.  The 
danger  to  guard  against  and  overcome 
is  the  reluctance  of  those  in  charge  of 
the  work  to  make  changes  which  ad- 
vance the  boy's  training,  but  at  a  tem- 
porary cost  in  output.  This  reluctance 
can  only  be  overcome  by  the  issue  of 
definite  instructions  from  headquarters. 

The  fifth  axiom — that  there  cannot  be 
too  many  highly-trained  apprentices — is 
certainly  true  in  my  experience.  The 
tendency  to  settle  down,  to  give  up  any 
definite  attempt  to  make  progress,  mani- 
fests itself  early  in  the  life  of  very  many 
young  men,  and  I  do  not  thing  that  the 
most  strenuous  efforts  to  persuade 
larger  numbers  to  steadily  advance 
themselves  in  knowledge  and  experience 


272 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


wiJl  ever  produce  more  than — or  even  as 
many  as — there  are  vacancies  waiting 
for  them  to  fill.  It  may  happen  at  times 
that  a  number  of  ambitious  and  capable 
young  men  finish  their  training  to- 
gether, and  they  may  think  themselves 
that  there  is  not  a  good  prospect  of  their 
finding  scope  for  their  abilities,  but  it 
is  a  temporary  effect,  and  the  average 
over  a  period  of  years  certainly  proves, 
I  think,  that  the  demand  for  highly 
trained  men  is  well  ahead  of  the  sup- 
ply- 

The  sixth  axiom — that  special  train- 
ing must  be  given  to  the  more  able — is, 
I  think,  worth  particularly  careful 
study.  It  is  met  in  the  factory  by  a 
selective  annual  examination  in  sub- 
jects relating  to  shop  practice,  the  re- 
sult of  which  is  combined  with  the  re- 
sult of  evening  class  attendance,  with 
timekeeping  in  the  works,  and  with  a 
report  on  conduct  submitted  by  the 
shop  foreman.  Every  quality  of  the 
boy's  ability  and  character  is  therefore 
included  in  determining  his  place  in  the 
list  which  is  prepared  of  those  having 
the  promise  of  executive  ability.  Ap- 
prentices who  win  a  place  on  this  list  are 
promoted  to  the  drawing  office,  are  given 
four  hours'  day  tuition  during  working 
hours  in  the  winter  months,  and  are  put 
through  a  wider  practical  training  in 
the  factory.  In  certain  cases  they  re- 
ceive a  set  of  tools,  which  becomes  their 
own  on  completion  of  apprenticeship. 
Since  it  is  felt  that  to  take  full  advant- 
age of  this  training  a  good  day-school 
education  is  essential  to  start  with,  the 
firm  have  recently  instituted  scholarships 
to  enable  boys  to  attend  a  suitable  course 
of  instruction  for  one  year  at  a  second- 
ary school  before  starting  their  work- 
shop training.  It  is  hoped  that  by  this 
means  it  will  be  possible  to  ensure  that 
every  boy  will  haVe  spent  at  least  one 
year  in  a  secondary  school  before  com- 
mencing  his    apprenticeship. 

In  conclusion  I  may  express  the  hope 
that  these  propositions  and  the  short 
description  of  their  application  to  one 
particular  factory  may  be  of  use  to  those 
who  just  now  are  considering  the  ques- 
tion of  the  higher  training  of  their  ap- 
prentices, a  question  among  the  most 
important  in  relation  to  that  general  in- 
dustrial betterment  which  we  hope  may 
result  from  the  many  changes  of  these 
troubled  times. 

© 

TURBINE  SPEEDS  AND 
APPLICATIONS 
By  T.  J. 
IN  the  earlier  stages  of  its  development 
the  steam  turbinei  was  considered  in 
many  quarters  to  hold  great  possibilities, 
not  so  much  from  high  epxectations  of 
thermal  efficiency,  as  by  reason  of  an  as- 
sumption that  it  must  prove  an  ideal 
prime  mover  for  coupling  to  electric  gen- 
erators in  power  stations  and  propeller 
shafts  in  steamships.  But  mechanical 
arrangements  seldom  work  out  in  prac- 
tice along  the  line  of  the  ideally  simple 
and  direct;  and  the  speed  of  the  large 
turbine  units  now  in  use  has  proved  to 
be  too  high  to  permit  of  the  satisfactory 


direct  coupling  of  turbines  either  to  pro- 
peller shafts  or  to  generators. 

Turbine  speeds  can,  of  course,  be  re- 
duced by  increasing  the  size  of  the  motor, 
but  only  at  the  price  of  greater  weight, 
higher  initial  cost  and  reduced  efficiency; 
and  consequently  the  present  trend  in 
both  electrical  and  marine  engineering  is 
all  in  the  direction  of  introducing  some 
form  of  reduction  gear  between  the  tur- 
bine and  the  propeller  shaft  or  generator. 
The  difficulty  confronting  the  marine 
engineer  is  that  the  most  efficient  speed 
for  a  screw  propeller  is  only  about  a 
quarter  or  a  fifth  of  the  most  efficient 
speed  of  a  steam  turbine,  and  if  he  de- 
cides upon  reduction  gear  his  choice  is 
between  helical  gearing,  electric  reduc- 
tion drive  and  hydraulic  reduction  drive. 
The  power  station  engineer  is  up  against 
the  fact  that  a  direct-current  generator 
running  at  2,500  or  3,000  rev.  per  min.  is 
subject  to  commutator  troubles  which,  in 
spite  of  many  ingenious  devices,  such  as 
the  radial  commutator,  are  not  easily 
overcome;  so  that  a  5,000  kilowatt  set  in 
a  single  machine  appears  to  be  the  limit 
for  safe  and  efficient  operation  with  a  di- 
rect coupled  turbo-generator. 

If  a  larger  power  from  one  set  is  re- 
quired, resort  must  be  made  to  one  of 
two  alternatives.  The  first  is  to  use  a 
turbo-alternator,  running  at  3,000  or 
3,600  revolutions  per  minute,  in  conjunc- 
tion with  a  rotary  converter.  This  forms 
a  combination  which,  in  certain  cases, 
has  distinct  advantages. 

This  combination  is  particularly  suit- 
able when  direct-current  power  must  be 
supplied  to  several  points  some  distant 
apart,  when  the  transmission  losses  and 
cost  of  mains  can  be  kept  to  a  minimum 
by  generating  at  a  moderate  or  high 
voltage,  and  transforming  down  at  the 
sub-station  where  the  rotaries  are  in- 
stalled. In  many  instances  direct  cur- 
rent is  essential  for  a  part  of  the  system 
only,  while  the  remainder  can  be  served 
more  efficiently  by  an  alternating  supply, 
a  case  for  which  the  rotary  converter 
plant  is  peculiarly  suitable.  With  such  a 
mixed  system  of  distribution  the  rotary 
has  the  further  advantage  that  it  can  be 
inverted,  taking  direct  current  from  sets 
with  which  it  works  in  parallel,  or  from 
a  battery,  and  supplying  alternating  cur- 
rent into  the  mains,  thus  helping  out  the 
alternating  current  sets  in  case  of  a 
breakdown.  A  further  advantage  arises 
if  there  is  a  linking  up  of  several  gen- 
erating stations,  because  small  direct 
current  stations  will  receive  alternating 
current  from  the  trunk  mains  and  con- 
vert it  into  direct  current  by  means  of  a 
rotary,  thus  having  their  main-turbo- 
altemator  sets  as  a  stand-by;  whereas, 
in  the  case  of  either  the  direct  connected 
or  geared  direct-current  generator,  it  will 
be  necessary  to  use  rotaries. 

The  other  alternative  is  to  use  double 
helical  turbine  gearing  to  reduce  the 
speed  of  the  turbine  to  that  most  suitable 
for  an  engine  type  direct-current  genera- 
tor; the  speed  of  the  former  is  usually 
between  3,000  and  4,000  revolutions  per 
minute  for  units  of  moderate  size.  The 
turbo-alternator  rotary  plant  does  not 
suffer  from  the  limitation  in  desirable 
size  which  applies  to  direct  coupling,  and 


also,  to  a  lesser  degree,  to  the  use  of 
mechanical  reducing  gears. 

© 

SEEKING  to  imitate  klingerite,  a  Ger- 
man packing  for  steam-pipe  joints, 
French  chemists  have  found  a  specimen 
of  the  material  about  a  sixth  of  an  inch 
thick  to  consist  of  fifteen  thicknesses 
of  thin  asbestos,  says  the  Chemical 
Trade  Journal.  These  layers  were  a 
compact  felting  of  the  best  long  fibres, 
mixed  with  2  per  cent,  of  flax  threads 
to  give  strength  and  pliability,  and  each 
side  was  coated  wath  an  agglutinant 
containing  sulphur,  designed,  it  is  sup- 
posed to  increase  impermeability  and 
resistance  by  slow  vulcanisation.  Analy- 
sis showed  80.5  per  cent,  of  asbestos,  2.2 
of  cellulose  (flax),  and  17  of  rubber  and 
balata,  with  a  small  proportion  of  sul- 
phur. 

© 

IN  his  annual  report  on  the  trade  of 
Denmark,  the  U.  S.  Consul-General  re- 
marks that  the  chief  hindrance  to  the  in- 
dustrial development  of  that  country 
has  been  the  lack  of  coal  deposits.  Den- 
mark produces  no  coal,  and  is,  therefore, 
placed  at  a  competitive  disadvantage. 
The  country's  industries  and  railways 
consume  annually  about  3,000,000  tons, 
most  of  which  comes  from  England  and 
Germany.  A  Danish  syndicate  was 
formed  in  1916  to  investigate  and  ex- 
ploit the  coalfields  of  Iceland,  a  report 
of  which  has  already  appeared  in  The 
Syren  and  Shipping.  During  the  past 
two  years  it  was  hoped  to  purchase  coal 
from  the  United  States,  but  freight 
rates  prevented  this  being  done. —  Syren 
and  Shipping. 

@ ■ 

THE  demonstrated  advantages  of  elec- 
tric motor  drive  as  applied  to  steel  mill 
service  are  rapidly  making  its  use  uni- 
versal in  rolling  mill  work,  while  as  re- 
gards reversing  mills,  substantial  evi- 
dence of  the  exceptional  superiority  of 
electric  drive  has  been  given  during  the 
past  two  years.  Less  than  two  years  ago 
there  were  two  electrically-driven  re- 
versing mills  operating  in  the  United 
States  and  one  in  Canada.  In  November- 
1916,  there  were  fifteen  mills  of  this  type 
either  in  operation  or  being  constructed, 
whilst  in  Britain,  according  to  the 
"British  Westinghouse  Gazette,"  there 
were  two. 

— m — 

VERY  good  results  are  said  to  have  been 
attained  in  the  experimental  manufac- 
ture of  square  and  bar  steel,  etc.,  at  the 
Kawasaki  Dockyard  Company's  branch 
factory  at  Hyogo,  where  two  15-ton 
smelting  furnaces  were  installed  last 
year.  Encouraged  by  these  results,  the 
company  has  decided  to  establish  a  steel 
works  on  an  extensive  scale  for  the 
manufacture  of  steel  plates  and  rails. 
According  to  "Eastern  Engineering,"  a 
suitable  site  is  being  sought  in  Fukuoka 
Prefecture,  Kyushu.  When  the  site  is 
fixed,  a  large  works,  with  five  30-ton 
smelting  furnaces  to  besrin  with,  will  be 
erected  on  a  capital  of  5,000,000  yen,  for 
manufacturing  steel  plates,  rails,  square 
and  bar  steel,  etc.,  the  same  as  the  Gov- 
ernment Steel  Works  at  Edamitsu. 


September  6,  1917. 


273 


Engineering   Exhibits  at  the  Canadian  National  Exhibition 

Staff  Article  cS 

The  value  of  Canada's  premier  annual  affair  a^  an  occnaion  on  which  to  gain  puhlicitu  a 
again  jvstified  by  a  visit  to  the  Machinery  Hall,  irhilr  nvij  dovhfx  regarding  the  mechanifica- 
tion  of  the  farmer  are  instantly  dispelled  by  an  e.nuninnt'nni  <if  fnu-tm-a,  el-ectric  light  plants, 
and  other  aida  toward  a  labor-saving  and  Ivxurionx  <'.rifitriifr  (or  xoj/x  nf  the  soil. 

It  is  of  especial  interest  at  this  time  to 
know  thp.t  tiiis  alloy  is  made  in  Canada 
in  the  Hoskins  factory,  an  important  part 
of  the  process  being  played  by  a  special 
type  of  carbon  resistance  furnace  which 
is  also  exhibited.  Its  simplicity  of  con- 
struction and  efficiency  of  operation  ren- 
der it  particularly  useful  in  high  temper- 
ature work. 


DESPITE  the  absence  of  a  few  not- 
able exhibitors  of  former  years, 
the  engineering  features  of  the  ex- 
hibition, both  in  the  Machinery  Hall  and 
elsewhere,  have  aroused  probably  a  more 
wide-spread  interest  than  for  many  years 
past.    The  fact  that  many  people,  brought 


developments  largely  due  to  the  recent 
munitions  activity  are  indicated  by 
several  of  the  exhibits.  One  of  these  is 
the  increasing  appreciation  of  the  benefits 
of  heat  treatment  in  certain  classes  of 
work,  and  in  this  field  much  initiative  has 
been  displayed  by  the  Canadian  Hoskins 


PAKT  UK   PRATT  &  WHITNEY   'S  EXHIBIT  OF  SMALL  TOOLS. 


in  contact  with  engineering  practice 
through  the  temporary  activity  of  muni- 
tions production,  are  now  earnestly  en- 
deavoring to  find  a  permanent  outlet  for 
their  efforts  is  one,  if  not  the  main  reason 
for  the  great  general  interest  displayed  by 
visitors  this  year. 

Present  conditions,  of  course,  have  post- 
poned any  improvement  in  the  facilities 
afforded  exhibi  ors,  but  had  proper  and 
deserved  encouragement  been  given  in  a 
timely  manner,  the  machinery  display 
would  not  be  handicapped  by  comparison 
with  certain  annual  events  in  the  States, 
which  are  noted  for  the  facilities  offered 
exhibitors  in  such  important  matters  as 
steam,  gas,  air  and  electricity  supply,  es- 
pecially in  the  matter  of  reasonable 
charges  for  the  latter  service.  As  matters 
are  now,  it  is  onlv  through  the  loyalty  and 
patriotism  of  exhibitors,  who  annually 
face  the  expense  and  inconvenience  of  two 
weeks'  dislocation  of  regular  business, 
that  the  standard  of  the  show  has  been 
maintained  at  its  present  level.  In  view 
of  the  services  rendered  to  the  Empire, 
and  the  great  degree  of  confidence  with 
which  the  industry  is  regarded  as  a  main- 
stay of  the  country  in  the  future,  no  ex- 
cuse short  of  absolute  lack  of  funds  can 
justify  a  continuance  of  the  present  luke- 
warm attitude  of  the  authorities  toward 
engineering  exhibitors.  The  thanks  of  the 
industry  are  indeed  due  to  those  who  con- 
tinue to  "carry  on." 

The  general  state  of  affairs  is  indicated 
by  one  noticeable  change  in  the  aspect  of 
the  show — munitions  have  disappeared 
and  manufactures  are  returhing.  Machine 
tools  are  the  heavyweights,  as  always,  but 


Co.,  the  well  known  pioneers  in  electrical 
furnace  and  pyrometer  development. 
Their  product  now  includes  also  gas-fired 
furnaces,  ovens  for  enamelling,  etc.,  and 
a  unique  product  in  the  shape  of  Chromel, 
a  non-ferrous  alloy,  which  possesses 
marked  non-corrosive  properties,  especi- 
ally under  the  influence  of  heat.  These 
properties  are  due  to  the  high  melting 
point  of  chromium  combined  with  the  great 
resistance  of  nickel  to  oxidization.  This 
metal  does  not  soften  appreciably  under 
heat  like  iron  and  has  a  life  approximately 
40  times  as  long.  Applications  already 
proven  include  carbonizing  boxes,  cyanide 
crucibles,  lead  pots,  barium  pots,  pyro- 
meter protecting  tubes,  etc. 


Further  interest  in  the  combustion  field 
is  stimulated  by  the  extensive  display  of 
manufacturers  furnaces  exhibited  by  the 
Consumers'  Gas  Co.  of  Toronto.  Appar- 
atus and  equipment  for  the  convenient 
use  of  gas  as  a  heat-producing  agent  in 
many  lines  of  industry  are  shown  in  oper- 
ation, gas  and  air  being  piped  to  most  of 
the  exhibits.  High  temperature  furnaces 
for  special  steel  hardening,  tool  room  fur- 
naces, ovens,  brazing  benches  and  blow 
pipes  demonstrate  clearly  the  adaptability 
of  gas  to  many  processes.  The  effect  of 
several  furnaces  at  white  heat  is  very 
marked  from  a  display  viewpoint,  the  en- 
tire exhibited  being  markedly  effective. 

Of  similar  interest  to  visitors  is  the  de- 
monstrations of  oxy-acetylene  welding 
work.  L'Air  Liquide  Society  show  the  use 
of  their  apparatus  in  the  manufacture  of 
storage  tanks  for  acetylene  gas,  to  with- 
stand 975  lbs.  pressure  per  sq.  in.  A 
samnle  of  liquid  air,  which  is  produced 
during  the  manufacture  of  oxygen  was 
an  item  of  more  than  ordinary  interest, 
in  which  one  could  test  the  effects  of  350 
deg.  below  zero  on  the  human  flesh.  Me- 
chanical apparatus  for  the  application  of 
the  oxv-acetylene  flame  to  manufacturing 
onerations  were  featured  by  the  Carter 
Welding  Co.,  who  showed  the  well  known 
Davis-Bournonville  apparatus  cutting 
steel  plates  of  any  thickness  and  shape. 
The  radiograph  is  an  ingeniously  ar- 
ranged machine  on  the  pantograph  prin 
ciple,  which  enables  patterns  to  be  copied 


•#^-;fc4i::  , 

^"■^iRl^mj 

THE  CONSUMERS'  GAS  CO.  E.XHIBIT  ED  GAS  FURNACES  IN   OPERATION. 


274 


CANADIAN    JI  A  C  11  I  N  E  R  Y 


Volume  XVIII. 


on  lai'ge  or  small  scales,  the  flame  cutting 
the  outline  as  determined  by  the  master 
design;  the  roughing  out  of  dies  and  simi- 
lar work  is  a  particularly  useful  field  for 
this  flevice. 

Special  appeal  is  made  to  the  skilled 
mechanic  and  fine  tool  maker  by  the  Pratt 
&  Whitney  exhibit  of  Canadian-made 
cutters,  reamers,  taps,  drills,  shell  tools 
and  special  articles  of  a  similar  nature. 
The  prestige  attached  to  the  name  is  well 
upheld  by  this  exhibit,  which  is  convinc- 
ing evidence  of  the  possibility  of  produc- 
ing such  goods  on  a  commercial  scale 
within  the  Dominion.  Complementary  to 
the  foregoing  are  the  machine  tool  exhibits 
of  Canada  Machinery  Corporation,  Gar- 
lock-Walker  Machinery  Co.  and  A.  R. 
Williams  Co.  Both  wood  and  metal-work- 
ing machines  are  displayed  on  a  large 
scale  by  the  former,  whose  annual  appeai'- 
ance  is  looked  forward  to  with  interest  by 
a  wide  circle  of  acauaintances.  A  fea- 
ture of  Garlock-Walker  is  the  showing 
of  numerous  views  in  lantern  slide  form, 
illustrating  iron  machinery  from  the  raw 
state  to  the  finished  product.  The  entire 
history  of  iron  is  shown  from  the  blast- 
ing of  the  rock  bv  the  miners,  through 
railroad  yards,  ore  docks,  blast  furnaces, 


steel  mills  and  foundries,  pattern  shops 
and  machine  shops  till  it  assumes  the  form 
of  a  lathe,  shaper  or  other  machine  tool, 
and  demonstrates  most  convincingly  the 
absolute  dependability  of  modern  manu- 
facturing on  this  one  metal  more  than  any 
other.  Suitable  types  of  modern  tools 
are  on  view  to  complete  the  exhibit. 

A  feature  of  the  Williams  exhibit  is  the 
demonstration  of  Stellite  cutting  tools  on 
heavy  forgin^'  machining.  This  wonder 
ful  alloy  depends  for  its  existence  entirely 
on  the  Canadian  deposits  of  cobalt,  and 
during  recent  times  has  earned  a  wonder- 
ful reputation  as  a  metal-cutting  material. 
Numerous  samples  showing  its  applica- 
tion to  tools  for  a  wide  range  of  operations 
are  displayed  by  the  Deloro  Smelting  & 
Refining  Co.  ^}- 

Pneumatic  tools  and  accessories  possess 
considerable  interest  in  view  of  their 
labor-saving  and  cost-reducing  ability. 
The  development  of  shipbuilding  both  in 
wood  and  steel  h^s  been  carefullv  studied 
by  the  Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.,  and 
special  wood-horing  machines  and  drifting 
hammers  are  featured  by  them  in  addition 
to  their  latest  types  of  regular  hammers 
and  accessories. 


Transmission  equipment  and  apparatus 
is  featured  by  the  Dodge  line,  one  of  the 
items  of  interest  being  an  exhibit  showing 
their  wood  pulley  in  different  stages  of 
construction,  from  the  plain  board  of 
selected  lumber  to  the 
perfectly  finished  wood- 
split  pulley  seen  on  the 
shafting.  Ball  bearing 
developments  are  also 
well  shown,  the  increas- 
ing recognition  of  this 
apparatus  as  an  effi- 
ciency factor  being  evi- 
denced by  the  presence 
of  the  Canadian  SKF 
Co.,  Ltd.,  which  makes 
a  convincing  demonstra- 
tion of  the  extreme  ac- 
curacy and  high  grade 
of  workmanship  in  their 
product.  The  exclusive 
feature  of  self-align- 
ment which  is  an  in- 
herent part  of  the  de- 
sign is  shown  by  means  of  bent  shafts, 
which  revolve  as  freely  in  a  fan  draft  as 
if  they  were  straight  and  true.  The 
Chapman  Co.  makes  an  effective  display 


Belting  exhibits  are  quite  noticeable 
especially  as  most  of  the  displays  repre- 
sent made  in  Canada  goods.  Of  the  four 
firms  showing,  each  makes  a  distinctive 
type  of  product.  Leather,  rubber,  and 
two  varieties  of  stitched  belting  are 
available  in  weights,  strengths,  and  fin- 
ish for  any  kind  of  industrial  need. 
Considerable  local  interest  attaches  to 
the  two  displays  of  .that  modern  develop- 
ment of  the  saw  bench  known  as  the 
combination  woodworker,  one  firm  in 
particular  having  developed  considerable 
business  across  the  line. 

Agricultural    Enginering 

Either  engineers  or  farmers  desirous 
of  investingating  farm  apparatus  which 
is  the  direct  product  of  the  machine  shop 
find  more  than  ample  opportunity  in  the 
section  devoted  to  this  display.  The 
present  question  of  food  control  has 
thrown  the  production  end  further  into 
the  spotlight  than  might  have  happened 
in  years,  and  the  fierce  blaze  of  criticism 
is  turned  loose  on  the  numerous  speci- 
mens of  tractors,  oil  engines,  pumps, 
electric  lighting  plants,  along  with  other 
quas'-machine     shop    products     .such     as 


THE   HUTCHINSON   WOOD-WORKEK    PERFORMS    LARGE   VARIETY    OF   OPERATIONS. 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  N    M  A  C  H  1  N  E  R  Y 


275 


SAWYER-MASSEY    12 


4    CYLIND      ER.    KEROSENE    DRIVEN    TRACTOR. 


milking  machines,  and  similar  products. 
As  a  Canadian  built  product,  the 
Sawyer-Massey  line  of  tractors  makes 
a  special  appeal.  Simplicity  of  construc- 
tion has  been  combined  with  convenience 
and  efficiency  of  operation  in  a  markedly 
successful  degree.  The  4  cyl.  vertical 
automobile  type  of  motor  is  placed  near 
the  rear  axle  to  give  maximum  adhesion, 
and  allows  the  transmission  case  and 
jack-shaft  to  be  placed  amidship  in  a 
most  accessible  position.  The  clutch 
likewise  benefits  thereby,  while  the  train 
of  reducing  gears  to  the  driving  wheels 
is  also  made  very  accessible.  Approved 
design  of  steering  gear  with  spring  buf- 
fers is  fitted  to  front  wheels.  Water 
cooling  with  fan  radiator  is  incorporated 
in  the  design  in  a  suitable  manner  the 
radiator  construction  being  exception- 
ally robust.  The  motor  is  4  in.  bore  by 
6  in.  stroke  running  700  to  1,000  rev.  per 
min.,  and  gives  22  horse  power  at  'the 
belt  pulley  and  12  at  the  draw  bar. 
Two    speeds    of    2%    and    3%    miles    per 


hour  are  provided,  while  weight  of  5,200 
lbs.  enables  three  to  four  plows  to  be 
operated. 

Allis-Chalmers  are 
showing  a  10-18  horse- 
power machine  of  the 
three  wheeled  type,  the 
single  front  wheel  fol- 
lowing the  furrow  auto- 
matically and  relieving 
the  operator  of  much  of 
the  steering  effort.  It 
is  operated  by  a  2  cyl. 
opposed  type  motor,  5% 
by.  7  inch  at  720  rev.  per 
min.  and  weighs  4,800 
lbs.  The  frame  is  a  one- 
piece  steel  casting, 
heat  treated,  while  the 
radiator  is  of  the  auto- 
mobile type  with  centri- 
fugal  pump. 

The    9-18    lease    trac- 
tor    was     shown     by     the     Faii-banks- 
Morse      Co.,     and     attracted     attention 


through  its  compact  design  and  won- 
derful hill  climbing  ability  demon- 
strated on  a  35  deg.  incline.  As  illus- 
trated the  motor  which  is  8  cyl.  vertical, 
is  placed  athwartships  so  as  to  obtain 
straight  spur  drive  to  rear  axle.  The 
front  axle  is  pivoted  vertically  at  the 
centre,  with  steering  knuckles  on  the 
wheels.  A  truck  type  of  radiator  is 
fitted  in  conventional  manner  and  has 
gear  driven  fan,  and  centrifugal  pump 
circulation.  Heavy  duty  roller  bearings 
are  used  wherever  desirable,  including 
the  transmission,  and  rear  axle,  and  an 
oil  tight  housing  encloses  the  bull  pin- 
ion and  gear.  Two  speeds  are  obtainable, 
along  with  ample  power  to  pull  two  14 
in.  plows. 

^© 

PASSING  IT  ALONG 

"The  neat  and  even  elegant  appear- 
ance of  the  American  soldier  isn't  main- 
tained," said  United  States  War  Secre- 
tary Baker  in  an  address,  "without  hard 
work.  Yes,  the  work  is  hard,  but  doesn't 
the  result  more  than  justify  it  ? 

"On  the  train  the  other  day  a  private 
sat   with   his   tunic   unbuttoned,   for   the 


temperature  was  high.  A  sergeant 
strode  up  to  him  and  said: 

"  'Button  up  that  tunic!  Did  you  never 
hear  of  by-law  217,  sub-section  D?  I'm 
Sergt.  Jabez  Winterbottom!' 

"A  gentleman  in  the  seat  behind  tap- 
ped the  sergeant  sternly  on  the  shoulder. 
"  'How  dare  you  issue  orders  with  a  pipe 
in  your  mouth?"  he  asked  'Go  home  and 
read  paragraph  174.  section  M,  part  IX. 
I'm  Major  Eustee  Carroll.' 

"Here  a  gentleman  with  a  drooping 
white  moustache  interposed  from  the 
other  side  of  the  aisle: 

"  'If  Major  Carrol,'  he  said  coldly,  'will 
consult  by-law  31  of  section  K,  he  will 
learn  that  to  reprimand  a  sergeant  in 
the  presence  of  a  private  is  an  offence 
not   lightly  to  be   overlooked." 


ALLIS-CHALMERS   THREE- WHEELED   TRACTOR  IN   OPERATION   ON  A  FARM. 


GOT  HIM  INTO  A  ROW 

Foreman  (to  workman  whom  he  has 
"sacked"  on  Saturday  and  then  finds  him 
at  his  job  again  on  Monday) — Hey.  young 
fellow-me-lad,  I  thought  I  sacked  you 
on  Saturday. 

Workman— ^So  you  did.  An'  a  nice 
blinkin'  row  you  gpt  nie  inter  wi'  the 
missus,  too. 


276 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIIf 


TheMacLean  Publishing  Company 

LIMITED 
(ESTABLISHED   1888) 

JOHN  BAYNE  MACLEAN President 

H.  T.  HUNTER     -     -     - Vice-President 

H.    V.    TYRRELL General    Manager 

PUBLISHERS    OF 

Canadian  Machinery 

-"  Manufactur  NG  News 

A  weekly  newspaper  devoted  to  the  machinery  and  manufactur- 
ing  interests. 

PETER  BAIN,  M.E.,  Editor.  B.  G.  NEWTON,  Manager. 

Associate    Editors 
A.  G.  WEBSTER  J.  M.  WILSON  J.  H.  RODGERS 


Office  of  Publication,  143-153  University  Avenue,  Toronto,  Ont. 

No.    10 


Vol.  XVIII. 


SEPTEMBER  6,  1917 


SKILLED   MECHANICS   A    POST-WAR   NECESSITY 

THERE  is  a  growing  disposition  to  recognize  that  the 
peace-time  essential  of  this  or  any  other  manufac- 
turing country  will  be  its  muster  of  skilled  mechan- 
ics. Shell-making  has  not,  as  is  perhaps  too  generally 
believed,  contributed  materially  to  Canada's  pre-war  quota 
of  the  latter  for,  with  the  exception  of  a  fair  percentage 
increase,  comparatively,  in  the  ranks  of  her  tool-makers 
and  equipment  designei-s,  the  abnormal  activity  of  the 
past  thirty  months  has  done  little  more  than  demonstrate 
the  possibility  of  rapidly  training  as  attendants  men  who 
to  all  intents  and  purposes  were  in  the  rough  so  far  as 
machine  tool  operating  knowledge  was  concerned. 

Shell  manufacture  was  highly  specialized,  but  in  the 
nature  of  things  was  quite  temporary  in  character.  Urg- 
ency of  production  by  the  most  direct  means  available  was 
the  keynote  of  the  whole  enterprise,  as  a  consequence 
little  opportunity  was  afforded  for  a  widespread  develop- 
ment in  the  training  of  expert  mechanics,  men  who  in  the 
coming  time  would  give  our  metal-working  industries  the 
degree  of  backbone  and  vigor  w'hich  will  undoubtedly  be 
required  if  we  are  to  procure  and  maintain  a  foothold  in 
the  world's  markets.  With  the  cessation  of  shell-making, 
attention  is  naturally  being  focussed  on  lines  of  product 
that  will  provide  capacity  activity  for  our  now  enlarged 
plant  establishment,  while  giving  at  the  same  time  assur- 
ance of  there  being  retained  in  steady  and  continuous  em- 
ployment the  skilled  men  now  possessed,  as  well  as  pro- 
viding opportunity  for  materially  supplementing  their 
numbers. 

It  should  be  borne  in  mind  that,  despite  the  war  activi- 
ties now  so  pronounced  in  the  United  States,  and  those  no 
less  in  evidence  in  Great  Britain  and  elsewhere,  the  keen- 
est interest  is  being  displayed  in  the  matter  of  post-war 
trade  preparedness,  and  that  recognition  as  never  before 
is  being  taken  of  the  thoroughly  trained  and  expert  me- 
chanic as  the  principal  factor  in  the  conditions  with  which 
we  will  be  confronted.  As  an  indication  of  how  the  sub- 
ject is  viewed  in  the  Old  Country,  the  following  para- 
graphs culled  from  a  recent  editorial  in  our  contemporary. 
Engineering,  may  not  be  without  interest  to  our  metal- 
working  plant  executives: 

;_The  deficient  supply  of  skilled  men  is  acutely  realized 

and  is  exercising  the  minds  of  all  who  employ  mechanics. 

A  man  having  the  mentality,  dexterity  and  character 


taken  for  granted  or  implied  in  the  term  skilled  mechanic,, 
or  competent  all-round  craftsman,  is  prima  facie  a  com- 
petent individual  in  a  much  wider  manner  than  in  a  purely 
trade  sense. 

Natural  aptitude,  large  mentality,  resource,  initiative, 
grit,  character — all  matters  which  make  a  man  worthy  of 
respect — are  the  inalienable  possession  of  the  man  who 
becomes  an  expert  mechanic. 

Good  mechanics  were  never  plentiful,  but  present-day 
conditions  have  separated  all  men  into  two  classes,  those 
having  skill  and  those  without.  Consequently,  there  has. 
been  a  remarkable  appreciation  in  value,  the  intrinsic 
worth  of  real  skill  has  never  been  so  realized  as  now.  It 
is  contended  that,  unless  steps  are  taken  to  enable  men  La 
acquire  real  skill,  invention  will  be  paralyzed,  improve- 
ment will  be  forfeited,  and  business  some  time  or  other  will 
have  to  be  rebuilt  upon  its  old  foundations. 

How  can  we  have  mechanics  unless  we  deliberately  set 
out  to  produce  them.  Modern  tendency  is  to  commit  indus- 
trial suicide.  There  are  two  outputs  going  on  simultane- 
ously from  any  business,  products  and  men;  the  former 
earns  profits,  the  latter  serve  a  national  as  well  as  an  in- 
dustrial end.  Plant  can  be  extemporized  more  rapidly 
than  skill,  but  if  the  result  is  to  materially  reduce  the  pro- 
duction of  skilled  craftsmen,  then  the  industry  must  ulti- 
mately be  penalized. 

Academic  training  alone  is  no  substitute,  since  it  can- 
not produce  the  practical  man  of  experience  nor  can  it 
give  manual  dexterity  of  a  high  order.  If  the  industry 
takes  no  steps  to  foster  one  of  the  most  inherent  of  human 
desires — skill  in  the  use  of  tools — it  is  going  to  decay  and 
not  to  progress.  Moreover,  the  nation  which  does  not 
produce  skilled  craftsmen  is  going  to  forfeit  industrial 
pre-eminence. 

© 

CONSTRUCTIVE   DISCONTENT 

PROGRESS  is  only  possible  where  the  spirit  of  dis- 
satisfaction prevails;  not  the  dissatisfaction  that 
tends  to  indifference  to  or  breeds  irritation  with 
conditions  or  environment,  but  that  feeling  of  discontent 
that  haunts  and  impresses  the  mind  with  the  thought  that 
one  is  not  living  up  to  and  making  the  most  of  the  oppor- 
tunities that  arise  from  day  to  day.  Knowledge  is  acquired 
when  we  begin  to  study  the  why  and  the  wherefore  of  our 
surroundings.  Gravitation  was  realized  long  before  New- 
ton appeared  on  the  scene,  but  it  was  to  the  fact  that  he 
was  not  content  to  take  the  falling  of  an  apple  as  a  mere 
incident  that  resulted  in  the  establishment  of  the  law 
which  defines  to  us  the  attraction  of  the  earth  for  other 
and  smaller  bodies. 

Discoveries  are  seldom  a  matter  of  chance;  they  are 
more  often  the  culmination  of  many  weary  hours,  or  per- 
haps days  and  weeks  of  ceaseless  thought  and  observation. 
It  is  unquestionably  true  that  worth-while  achievements 
are  the  work  of  a  few  individuals;  these  and  these  only 
being  responsible  for  the  various  departures  from  time- 
worn  precedents. 

Despite  the  fact  that  all  are  endowed  with  the  same 
faculties,  the  great  majority  are  content  and  willing  that  a 
few  only  shall  develop  these  faculties  to  the  point  where 
an  enlarged  imagination  becomes  the  source  of  dissatis- 
faction that  eventually  results  in  the  attainment  of  ideals 
which  are  the  foundation  stones  of  success.  The  man  who 
is  content  with  his  present  condition  has  lost  all  initiative. 
Breaking  new  ground,  as  it  were,  is  expressive  of  dis- 
content, with  things  as  they  are.  When  uneasiness  of 
mind  is  of  a  constructive  nature,  the  consequence  cannot 
be  other  than  progressive;  on  the  other  hand,  dissatisfac- 
tion that  hinges  on  indifference  is  destructive  and  an 
obstacle  to  progress  rather  than  otherwise. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


mmmaii^iiyjiiy.wi^'MiU'ia^'iBjii!^iiytiiU'i'i^'i!u^^ 


INDUSTRIAL    NOTABILITIES 

LAWFORD  GRANT.  C.E..  manging    director    and  treasurer,  Eugene  F. 
Phillip^i  Electrical  Work:^,  Ltd..  electric  wire  and  cable  manufacturer.?; 
director,  E.  M.  Sellon  &  Co..  Ltd..  was  born  in  Swansea,  Eng.,  Aug.  30, 
1878.  son  of  Alexander  and  Eunice  Maria  Grant. 

After  completing  his  education  at  Winchester  House,  Clifton.  Eng.,  he  was 
an  articled  pupil    with    Arthur    Powell,    .M.I.C.E.,    Bristol.  1 81)5-1899 :  civil 


vr77 


d±^ 


^T77 


/^  K 


LAWTORD    GRANT.     C.E. 

engineer  with  T.  J.  Scoones,  Bristol,  1899-1901;  superintendent  engineer  and 
agent  for  British  Insulated  &  Helsby  Cables,  Ltd.,  at  H.M.  Dockyard,  Malta, 
1905-1907 ;  came  to  Canada  in  1907  as  president  and  managing  director  of  the 
Canadian  Briti-sh  Insulated  Co.,  Ltd.;  became  a.ssistant  manager  of  the  Eugene 
F  Phillips  Electrical  Works.  Ltd..  Montreal,  1918;  appointed  president. 
May,  1917. 

Mr.  Grant  is  a  member  of  Montreal  Board  of  Trade ;  member  of  Canadian 
Manufacturers'  Association ;  Honorary  Secretary  for  Canada,  Institution  ot 
Electrical  Engineers  (London)  ;  his  technical  attainments  being  indicated  by 
membership  of  the  latter  body,  as  well  as  M.A.I.E.E. 

On  Nov.  4,  1905,  he  married  Nancy  Nelmes  Grant,  daughter  of  John 
Grant.  England,  their  family  consisting  of  three  sons  and  three  daugliters. 
Mr.  Grant  is  Protestant  in  religion  and  Liberal-Conservative  in  politico. 

His  clubs  include:  Montreal;  Engineers';  Royal  Montreal  Golf;  Automo- 
bile Club  of  Canada.    Golf  is  his  principal  recreation. 

Mr.  Graft's  residence  is  593  St.  Joseph  Street,  T-achine,  Que. 

Photo,  Courtesy  British  &  Colonial  Press. 


'./'iffli^iffli'iiSi'iffiM!'^^ 


278 


Volume  XVIII. 


SELECTED   MARKET    QUOTATIONS 

Being  a  record  of   prices  current  on  raw  and  finished  material  entering 
,  into    the   manufacture  of    mechanical  and    general  engineering   products. 


PIG   IRON. 

Grey    forge,    Pittsburgh $46  95 

Lake  Superior,   charcoal,   Chi- 

'    cago    68  00 

Ptandard  low  phoa.,   Philadel- 
phia        87  00 

Bessemer.    Pittsburgh    51  95 

Basic,   Valley  furnace    48  00 

Montreal     Toronto 

Hamilton    

Victoria    60  00 

riNISHED    IRON    AND    STBEL,. 

Per   lb.    to   Large   Buyers.      Cents 

Iron  bars,  base,  Toronto 5  25 

Steel   bars,   base,   Toronto. ...     5  50 
Steel    bars,    :;    in.    to    4    in. 

base   G  00 

Steel   bars,  4  in.  and  larger 

,   base    7  00 

Iron   bars,   base,    Montreal    . .     5  25 
Steel   bars,   base,   Montreal...     6  50 

Reinforcing  bars,  base   5  25 

Steel    hoops    7  50 

Refined    iron    5  60 

Norway    iron    1100 

Tire   steel    6  60 

Spring    steel     7  00 

Band  steel.  No.    10  gauge 5  76 

Chequered  floor  plate,  3-16  in.  15  20 
Chequered   floor  plate.    Vi    in..  15  00 

Staybolt   iron    8  60 

Bessemer     rails,     heavy,     at 

■mill     ,3S  00 

Steel  bars,  Pittsburgh   4  00 

Tank    Piates,    Pittsburgh    9  00 

Structural   shapes,    Pittsburgh     4  00 
Steel   hoops,    Pittsburgh    5  25 

F.O.B..    Toronto    Warehouse. 

Steel  bars   6  50 

Small  shapes    5  7.5 

P.O.B.    Chicago    Warehouse 

Steel    bars    6  00 

Structural  shapes   5  00 

Plates    fi  00 

FKEIGHT    BATES. 

Pittsburgh    to    Following  Points 
Per  100   lbs. 

C.L.  L.C.I-. 

Montreal    23.1  31.5 

St.    John,    N.B 35.1  45  5 

Halifax    35.1  453 

Toronto     18. 9  22  1 

Guelnh    IS. 9  22  ] 

London    18. 9  22.1 

Windsor    18. 9  22  1 

Winnipeg     64.9  85.1 

METALS. 

Montreal  Toronto 

■Lake  copper   $33  00  $34  00 

Electro  copper   33  00  34  00 

Castings,  copper 32  00  33  00 

Tin     61   60  64  00 

Spelter    10  50  11   00 

Lead    13  00  13  00   ' 

Antimony     20  00  20  00 

Aluminum     67   00  64   00 

Prices   per    100    lbs. 
PLATES. 

Montreal     Toronto 

Plates,    14   to   % $12  00  $12  00 

Heads     12  30  12  30 

Tank  plates,   3-16    in.  12  65  12  26 

WROUGHT   PIPE. 

Effective  July  5,   1917. 

Black     Galvanized 
Standard    Buttweld. 
Size.  Per  100  feet 

%    in $  6  00  $  6  50 

.,%  and  %  in...       5  12  7  16 

%    in 6  46  8  03 

8  17  10  29 

12   07  16   22 

1%    in 16  33  20  6» 

IM    in 19  63  24  61 

26  27  33   12 

42  12  52  94 

66  08  69  23 

69  92  86  94 

82  84  103  00 


Standard    Lapweld. 

2  in.     ..■ 29  23  35  71 

2V2     in 43  88  54   11 

3  in 67  38  70  76 

31/2    in 7176  89  70 

4  in 85  02  106  28 

414    in 96  52  121  29 

5  in 112  60  141  34 

6  in 146  90  183  36 

7  in 190  40  238   00 

8  L   in 200  00  260  00 

8  in 230  40  288  00 

9  in 276  00  345  00 

10  L   in 266  00  320  00 

10        in 329  60  412  00 

Prices — Ontario,    Quebec  and 
Maritime   Pr 


WROUGHT    NIPPLES. 

4"   and   under,   45%. 
4U."  and  larger,  40%. 
4"     and     under,     running     thread, 
25%. 

Standard  couplings,  4"  and  under, 
36%,. 

41^"  and  larger,  16%. 

OLD   MATERIAL. 
Dealers'  Buying  Prices. 

Montreal  Toronto 

Copper,    light    $20  00       $22  00 

Copper,   crucible    ...   23  00         27  00 

Copper,    heavy    23  00  25  60 

Copper  wire   22  00         25  60 

No.   1  machine  com- 
position        20  00         22  00 

New  brass  cuttings.    16  00         19  00 
No.  1  brass  turnings  14  00         16  00 

Light    brass     12  00  10   60 

Medium    brass    16  00         16  00 

Heavy    brass    16  00  18  00 

Heavy   melting   steel  21   00         17  00 

Steel   turning    12  00  8   00 

Shell  turnings    12  00         12  00 

Boiler   plate    22  00         10  .'50 

Axles,  wrought  iron.  30  00         24  00 

Rails    25  00         18  00 

No.    1    machine   cast 

iron    26  00         25  00 

Malleable    scrap    ...   20  00         20  00 

Pine,   wrought    19  00  9  00 

Car    wheels,    iron...   26  00         26  00 

Steel    axles    29   00  30  00 

Mach.    shop   tum'gs.     8  60  8  50 

Cast   borings    12  00  8  50 

Stove  plate   19  00         19  00 

Scrap    zinc    6   60  9   50 

Heavy   lead    10  00  10  75 

Tea    lead    7   00  7   00 

Aluminum     30  00  35  00 

BOLTS.     NUTS    AND     SCREWS. 
Per  Cent. 
Carriage  bolts,    %"  and   less.     10 
Carriage  bolts  7-16   and   up.,     net 

Coach  and  lag  screws 25 

Stove   bolts    55 

Plate   washers    List  plus   10 

Machine      bolts,      7-16      and 

over    net 

Machine   bolts,    %   and    less..      10 

Blank    bolts    net 

Bolt  ends    net 

Elevator  bolts    50  and   6 

Machine  screws,   fl.   and    rd. 

hrt..    steel     27^4 

Machine   screws.    0.    and    fli. 

hrt..    steel     10 

Machine   screws,  fl.   and    rd. 

hd..  brass  add  20 

Machine  scre'^s,   0.   and   fil. 

hd..  brass   add  25 

Nuts,  square  blank    add  $1  50 

Nuts,    square,    tapped add     1  75 

Nuts.  hex.  blank add     1  75 

Nuts,   hex.    tapped add     2  00 

rnpiicr      rivets      and    burrs. 

list   plus    ZO 

Purrs   only   list   plus    ^0 

Iron  rivets  and  burrs   17 1,^ 

Bnller     rivets,     base     ?i-ln, 

and   larger $7  60 

Structural    rivets,    as    above.   7  50 
Wood   screws,   flat,  bright..      .72% 


Wood      screws.     O.     &      R., 

bright    67Mi 

Wood    screws,    flat,    brass..      .37Vj 

Wood     strews,     O.     &     R., 

brass    32y2 

Wood   screws,    flat,   bronze.      .27Vi! 

Wood  screws,  O.  &  R. 
bronze    .      25 

MILLED    PRODUCTS. 

Per  cent. 

Set   screws    .to 

Sq.  &  Hex.  Head  Cap  Screws  30 
Rd.  &  Fil  Head  Cap  Screws  10 
Flat  %  But.  Hd.  Cap  Screws 

plus    10 

Fin.    &   Semi-fln.   nuts   up   to 

1    in 25 

Fin.   and   semi-fln.   nuts,  over 

1  In.,   up  to  H4   In 30 

Fin.    and   semi-fln.   nuts,   over 

1%   In.,   up   to   2   In 10 

Studs     20 

Taper  pins    40 

Coupling  bolts,   plus   10 

Planer     head     bolts,     without 

fillet,  list  plus   10 

Planer       head       bolts.       with 

fillet,   list  plus  10  and   It 

Planer   head    bolt   outs,   same   as 

finished  nuts. 

Planer  bolt   washers    net 

Hollow  set  screws. .  .list  plus     20 

Collar  screws   list  plus  30,  10 

Thumb    screws    20 

Thumb    nuts    65 

Patch    bolts    add    40,   10 

Cold     pressed     nuts     to     1V4 

In add    W.50 

Cold    pressed    nuts    over    11^ 

In add   $7.00 

BILLETS. 

Per  gross  ton 

Bessemer   billets    $  75  00 

Open-hearth    billets    95  00 

O.H.  sheet  bsrs   80  00 

Forging  billets    100  00 

Wire  rods    90  00 

F.o.b,   Pittsburgh. 
NAILS  AND   SPIKES. 

Wire    nails    6  60  5  46 

Cut    nails    6  70  B  80 

Miscellaneous    wire    nails    ..  60% 

Spikes,    %   in.   and   larger 7  60 

Spikes.    11    and    6-16    in 8  00 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Solder,    strictly    0  37 

Solder,    guaranteed    0  40 

Babbitt  metals    18   to   70 

Soldering  coppers,   lb 0,53 

Lead    wool,    per   lb 0   16 

Putty,    100-lb.   drum    4  35 

White   lead,   pure,   cwt 19  00 

Red    dry   lead,   lOO-lb.    kegs, 

per   cwt IB  45 

Glue.  English    0  38 

Tarred  slaters'  paper,  roll  0  93 
Gnsoline,  per  gal.,  bulk...  0  31 14 
Benzine,  per  g.nl..  hulk....  0  3014 
Pnre       turpentine,       sJngle 

bbls.,  gal 0  61 

Linseed     oil,     raw,     sinfrle, 

bbls 1  49 

Linseed    oil,    boiled,    single 

bbls 1  52 

Plaster  of  Pnrls,  per  bhl..  2  .'50 
Sandoaper,   B.   &   A.    ..list  plus     20 

Emery    Cloth    list  plus     33  1-3 

Borax,    cyrstal     15 

Sal   Soda    0  03% 

Sulphur,    rolls    0  05 

Sulphur,   commercial    0  04^4 

Rosin    "D,"    per    lb 0  03 

Rosin    "G,"    per    lb 0  03% 

Borax  crystal  and  granular  0  16 
Wood  alcohol,  per  gallon..  2  IB 
Whiting,  plain,  per  100  lbs.     2  20 


KOPE    AND    PACKINGS 

Plumbers'  oakum,  per  lb 09 

Packing,    square    braided    34 

Packing,  No.    I   Italian 40 

Packing,  No.   2   Italian 32 

Pure  Manila  rope   37 

British   Manila   Rope 31 

New  Zealand  Hemp 31 

Transmission    rope.    Manila 43 

Drilling    cables,    Manila    39 

Cotton   Rope,    ^-in.   and   up...     .47 

POLISHED    DRILL    ROD. 

Discount   off   list,    Montreal 
and  Toronto    25% 

CARBON    DRILLS    AND 
REAMERS. 

Per  Cent. 

S.S.  drills,  wire  sizes  up  to  52  40 
S.S.  drills,  wire  sizes.  No,  53 

to   80    25 

Standard    drills   to   1^    In...  40 

Standard   drills,  qver  l'^   In.,  15 

3-fluted  drills,  plus  10 

Jobbers'  and  letter  sizes 40 

Bit  stock   4<j 

Ratchet   drills    ij 

S.S.  drills  for  wood    40 

Wood    boring   brace   drills   ...  2£ 

Electricians'  bits  30 

Sockets  4(1 

Sleeves    40 

Taper   pin    reamers    20 

Drills   and    countersinks    .... 

list   plus  30 

Bridge  reamers  45 

Centre    reamers    10 

Chucking    reamers    10 

Hand    reamers    16 

COLD    ROLLED    SHAFTING. 

At    mill    Hat  plus  40% 

-•Vt    warehouse list  plus  50% 

Discounts    off    new    list.       Ware- 
house   price  at    Montreal   and 
Toronto. 

IRON    PIPE    FITTINGS. 

Canadian  malleable.  A,  add 
7V4%  ;  B  and  C.  10% ;  cast  iron. 
35%;  standard  bushings,  50%; 
headers,  60;  flanged  unions,  40: 
malleable  bushings,  50;  nipples, 
55;    m.illeable   lipped    unions,   50. 

SHEETS. 

Montreal  Toronto 

Sheets,  black.  No.  28.$11  00  $11  00 
Sheets,  black.  No.  10.  11  50  11  50 
Canada     plates,     dull. 

52    sheets    11  00       11  00 

Canada       plates.       all 

bright     12  60       12  60 

Apnllo  br.nnd,  W%  oz. 

galvanized     12  25       12  09 

Queen's    Head,    28    B. 

W.G     11  75       10  75 

Fleur-de-Lls,  28  B.W. 


G 11  75 


r.  No.  28  U.S.  13 
r,   10%  oz.   ...   13 


10  00 

12  70 

13  00 
20  00 


PPOOF  COIL  CHAIN. 
B 

Vi  in $12  00 

5-16   in 11  60 

%    in 11   15 

7-16    in 10  90 

U   in 10  70 

9-16    in 10  70 

%   in 10  50 

%    in 10  40 

(g)    in 10  25 

1    inch 10  10 

Extl-a  for  B.B.  Chain 1  20 

Extra  for  B.B.B.  Chain 1  80 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  :V  D  I  A  N    M  A  C  H  I  N  E  R  Y 


279 


EL,ECTR1C    WELD    COIL 
CHAIN  B.B. 

hb    in J15  50 

3-16  in  11  70 

'4  in 8  40 

0  lU  in 7  40 

■»  i'! 6  35 

7-16  iu 6  35 

Va  ia 6  35 

':i>   lu 6  35 

%    In 6  35 

l'ri<r»    per    iOO    lbs. 
MLUS    A.NU    RASPS. 

i'er  Cent. 
Great    Western.    American    ...   50 

Kearney  &   Foot,   .\rcaiie 50 

J.    Barton   Smith,    Eagle 50 

McClelland,    Globe    60 

Whitman    &    Barnes    50 

Black    Diamond    40 

Delta  Files    37^ 

Nicholson     40 

P.H.    and    Imperial    50 

Globe     50 

Vulcan     60 

Disston 50 

COAL  AND  COKE. 

Solvay   Foundry   Coke    $13  05 

Connelsville    Foundry    Coke...  14  00 

Steam    Lump    Coal 7  25 

Best   Slack    6   50 

Net    ton    f.o.b.    ToroDto 
BOILER  TUBES. 

Seam-  Lap- 

Size,  less  welded 

1  in $33  DO  

1  Vi     in 36  00  

I'i;     in 38   00  32   00 

1*4     in 38   00  32   00 

2  in 45   00  33   00 

2' I     in 48  00  35  00 

2'i    in 50  00  38  00 

3  in 58  00  45  00 

3'4     in 53  00 

3i'g     in 70  00  55   00 

4  in. 82  00  67  00 

Prices  per  100  feet,  Montreal 

and  Toronto. 
OILS     .\ST>     COMPOUNDS. 

Castor  oil,  per  lb 40 

Ito.rallte.   per  gal.,   bulk 16 

F'-il:i.-inp    19 

M.nchlne  oil,   per  gal 26% 


Black  oil,  per  gal 15 

Cylinder  oil.    Capital    io^-2 

Cylinder  oil.  Acme  'MW 

Standard  cutting  compound. 

per    lb 0  06 

Lard  oil,  per  gal 2  50 

Tnion     thread     cutting     oil 

antiseptic     88 

.\cme    cutting    oil.    antisep- 
tic         "~"! 

Imperial    nuenchlng    oil    3!i'.'. 

Petroleum  fuel  oil    12',-. 

BELTING— NO.    1    OAK 
T.I1NNEI). 
i!;.ttra     heavy,     single     and 

double    Sn-.iT, 

•it.indard    +ii'-. 

Cut   leather  lacing.  No.   1 1  75 

Leather   in   sides    1  60 

T.\PES. 
Chesterinan  Metallic.  50  ft. .$2  on 
Lufkin  Metallic.  «)3.  50  ft..  •-'  on 
.\rtiuiral  Steel  Tape.  50  ft...  2  T.". 
.\dmiral  Steel  Tape.  100  f t . .  4  ^." 
Major  .Tun.  Steel  Tape.  50  ft.  .■!  .".11 

Kivnl  Steel  Tape.  50  ft 2  75 

liival   Steel   Tape.  100  ft 4  4*. 

rteliable  Jun.  Steel  Tape,  50 

ft 3  50 

WASTE. 
White         Cents  per  111. 

.\XX    Extra    20 

I'eerless    20 

Grand    19 

Superior    19 

-K    L   C   K    IS 

Atlas    18 

.\    Empire    IS 

Ideal    17 

.\    press    16 

COLORED. 

Lion     1414 

Standard    13 

Vn.    1 13 

Popular   11% 

Keen     10% 

WOOL  PACKING. 

Anew 25 

.\.vle    20 

Anvil     15 

.\nchor    11 


WASHED    Wll-EKS. 

Seleit    White    12 

.Mi.^eii    cul.ired     ^ 10 

Dark   colored    09 

This   list    Bubjert    tu   truilr   ilii- 
count    for    quantity. 

Rt'BBER   BELTING. 

Standard    40% 

Best   grades    20% 

ANODES. 

Nickel     50  t^'       5J 

Cobalt    1.75  to  2  on 

Copper 44  1(1       Ji. 

Tin     49  ui 

Zinc     23  to     .25 

Prices   Per   Lb. 

COPPER   PRODUCTS. 

.Montreal  Tiirnnto 

Bars.   V2   to  2  in .55  00    5:;  00 

Copper  wire,  list  plus  10. 
Fhiin    sheets,    14    oz.. 

14x2S  in..  l4xH0  in.  55  00    5:!  .50 
Copper  .sheet,   tinned. 

14xro,  14  oz.    tiO  00     54  25 

Copper    sheet.    pl;in- 

ished,    14xC0    base.  M  00     CO  00 
P.r.-iziers'.    in    sheets, 

Cs4    base    55  00    52  00 

BRASS. 

I'.t.iss  rods,  base  V4  in  to  1 
in    Id     0  55 

Itra^^s  siicets.  S  in.  aide,  20 
n?. 0  60 

P.)-ass    tuiiiiig.    seamiess....     0  57 

Copper   tubing,   seamless...     0  5S 

PLATING    SIPPLIES. 

PoHshinB    wheels,     felt.  3  00 
I'olishiig  wheels,  bull- 
neck    1  75 

Kjnery  in  kegs,  Ameri- 
can      06 

Pumice,    ground    05 

ICinery    glue    15  to       20 

Tripoli    composition...  04  to       06 

Crocus    composition...  07  to      08 

Emery    composition 08  to       09 


Rouge,    silver    35  to       .50 

Houge.   powder   30  to      :::> 

Prices   Per  Lb. 
LEAD   SHEETS. 

Montreal  Toronto 
Sheets,  3  lbs.  sq.  ft.  .$18  00  $18  00 
Sheets,    3%    lbs.   sq. 

ft 18  00       18  00 

Sheets,    4    to    6    lbs. 

sq.  ft 17   60        17   50 

Cut  sheets,  %c  per  lb.  extra. 
Cut   sheets   to   size,    Ic  <)er   lb. 
extra. 

PLATING    CHEMICALS. 

Acid,   horaclc   J   .15 

Acid,    hydrochloric    05 

Acid,    hydrofluoric    14% 

Acid,    nitric    10 

Acid,    sulphuric    05 

.\mmonia.   aqua    08 

Ammonium  carbonate 15 

.\mmonium    chloride    11 

Ammonium  hydrosulphuret     .40 

.\mnionium    sulphate    07 

Arsenic,    white    12 

Copper,   carlionate,   anhy..      .35 

Copper,   sulphate    17 

Cobalt   sulphate   70 

Iron    perchloride    £0 

Lead    acetate    19 

Nickel       ammonium       sul- 
phate     12 

Nickel   carbonate 36 

Nickel    sulphate    15 

Potassium   carbonate 75 

Potassium    sulphide    (sub- 
stitute!      20 

Silver   chloride    (per   oz.).       .60 
Silver  nitrate    (per  oz.)...      .55 

Sodium    bisulphite    10 

Sodium   carbonate  crystals     .to 
Sodium    cyanide,    127-130%     .41 

Sodium    hydrate    04 

Sodium    hyposulphite,    per 

100    lbs 5.00 

Sodium    phosphate    H 

Tin    chloride    fn 

Zinc   chloride   fiO 

Zinc   sulphate    An> 

Prices   Per  Lb.  Cnless  Otberulu' 
Stated. 


The    General    Market    Condition   and    Tendency 

IVrOW  that  the  iminitiini:^  industry  i.-  definitely  coming  to  an 
end.  the  engineering  trade  enters  on  a  period  of  readjustment. 
Concerns  hitherto  engaged  in  manufacturing  munitions  are  turn- 
ing their  attention  to  other  work  and  in  some  cases  have  aheady 
licen  successful,  particularly  in  the  introduction  of  marine  engine.-;. 
This  field  of  activity  is  necessarily  limited,  hut  will  serve  to  relieve 
the  situation  to  some  e.xtent.  No  developments  have  materialized 
in  the  iron  and  steel  trade  and  the  outlook  continues  sontewhat 
unsettled  on  account  of  the  embargo  and  also  because  of  the 
uncertainty  .surrounding  the  price-fixing  policy  of  the  United 
States  Government.  It  is  believed  that  an  announcement  will  be 
made  at  Wa.shington  in  the  near  future.  Prices  of  steel  product-; 
are  showing  a  weaker  tendency,  although  the  only  important 
decline  so  far  has  been  in  semi-finished  material.  This,  however, 
foreshadows  reces.'^ions  in  other  line.*.  The  domestic  pig-iron 
situation  continues  unchanged,  the  market  still  being  unsettled 
and  quotations  practically  nominal.  In  the  States  the  pig-iron 
market  is  somewhat  easier  in  spite  of  the  continued  heavy  demand. 
The  coke  market  is  unsettled,  owing  to  the  po.ssibility  of  Govern- 
ment control.  Prices  in  the  meantime  are  holding  firm  and  the 
output  is  increa.'^ing  in  voluine.  The  non-ferrous  metal  markets 
are  dull  and  featureless,  due  to  the  uncertain  outlook.  Consumers 
continue  to  show  lack  of  interest  in  the  market  in  view  of  possible 
price  reces.«ion.s.  There  is  nothing  of  particular  importance  to 
note  in  regard  to  machine  tools,  the  situation  being  unchanged. 


Montreal,    Que.i    Sept.    1,    1917.— The 

chief  topic  of  interest  of  the  past  week 
has  been  the  total  closing  of  certain 
munition  plants  and  the  partial  closing 
of   others,    owing   to   the    recent    orders 


issued  from  the  Imperial  Munitions 
Board  to  the  effect  that  the  production 
of  shell  would  in  future  be  greatly  cur- 
tailed. Many  of  the  smaller  plants  have 
already    discontinued    operations     while 


some  of  the  larger  establishments  have 
released  large  numbers  of  their  em- 
ployees, with  the  prospect  in  the  near 
future  of  letting  out  many  more.  Num- 
bers of  these  will  undoubtedly  be  ab- 
sorbed in  other  lines  of  activity.  JIany 
firms  are  now  working  on  their  pre-war 
activity  while  others  are  contemplating 
engaging  in  other  lines  of  domestic  en- 
terprise. Certain  sections  of  the  coun- 
try are  more  or  less  disturbed  owing  to 
the  near  approach  of  conscription,  but 
this  is  expected  to  have  slight  effect 
upon  the  enforcement  of  the  Act.  The 
general  activity  in  this  territory  is  well 
maintained  and  with  the  exception  of  the 
munition  output  no  appreciable  differ- 
ence is  as  yet  pronounced. 
Pig   Iron 

The  greater  difficulty  in  obtaining  raw 
material  from  the  United  States  is  part- 
ly offset  by  the  falling  off  in  the  re- 
quirements owing  to  the  curtailment 
necessary  resulting  from  the  recent  de- 
velopments in  the  Canadian  shell  pro- 
ducing activity.  Domestic  conditions, 
however,  are  still  comparatively  un- 
changed, as  Canadian  producers  are  still 
able  to  consume  the  bulk  of  their  own 
production.  Quotations  on  Cana  Han 
iron  may  again  be  available  in  the  near 
future. 

Steel 

What  effect  the  recent  developments 
will  have  upon  the  steel  situation  here 
in  Canada  is  at  present  problematical,  as 
conditions  are  such  that  it  is  very  difli- 


280 


UAi^ADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


cult  to  foretell  what  may  take  place  in 
the  near  future.  The  curtailment  in  the 
production  of  the  various  classes  of  mun- 
itions will  undoubtedly  result  in  a  fall- 
ing off  in  the  output  of  such  steel  as 
has  been  required  to  maintain  this  in- 
dustry at  the  abnormal  activity  of  the 
past  years.  No  doubt  considerable  raw 
material  will  still  be  produced  and  ex- 
ported for  shell-making  purposes  abroad 
but  the  bulk  of  previous  activity  will  be 
largely  discontinued.  Owing  however,  to 
the  demand  in  other  directions,  it  is  not 
thought  likely  that  the  market  in  gen- 
eral will  be  much  affected.  The  Ameri- 
can situation  continues  more  or  less 
unsettled  due  to  the  fact  that  no  defin- 
ite understanding  has  yet  been  arrived  at 
in  connection  with  a  stated  price  that 
will  regulate  early  market  conditions. 
The  decline  in  the  production  of  steel 
billets  and  bars  that  have  been  used  for 
the  manufacture  of  shells  may  relieve  to 
some  extent  the  domestic  situation  in 
small  bars  and  shapes,  as  the  mills  in 
this  country  will  be  in  a  position  to 
handle  this  class  of  material,  but  as  re- 
gards plate  work  of  every  description 
it  is  not  likely  that  recent  developments 
will  have  a  bearing  on  this  commodity, 
owing  to  the  inability  of  the  local  mills 
to  roll  the  necessary  material.  Under 
these  conditions  there  is  a  possibility 
that  a  certain  proportion  of  structural 
work  may  be  resumed,  but  ship  building 
and  car  interests  will  reap  little  benefit 
from  the  change,  in  so  far  as  the  pro- 
duction of  material  is  concerned.  The 
American  situation  is  still  dominated  by 
the  uncertain  attitude  of  the  Govern- 
ment in  the  delayed  announcement  of  a 
definite  policy  regarding  the  action  they 
propose  taking  in  connection  with  the 
regulation  of  prices.  Price  changes  on 
the  American  market  are  very  few,  those 
noted  showing  a  slightly  weaker  tend- 
ency. Local  dealers  report  unchanged 
conditions  witih  quotations  well  main- 
tained. Much  difficulty  is  still  experi- 
enced in  getting  delivery  from  points  in 
the  States. 

Metals 

With  the  decline  in  the  production  of 
munitions,  it  is  expected  that  the  metal 
market,  especially  in  Canada,  will  ex- 
perience a  period  of  readjustment  as 
far  as  war  requirements  are  concerned; 
no  sharp  decline  is  looked  for  in  prices 
as  conditions  in  the  States  will  more 
than  balance  the  absence  of  activity  in 
this  particular  direction.  Copper  is 
easier.  Tin  has  a  firmer  tendency  on 
better  demand.  Spelter  is  steadier  but 
quiet.  Lead  is  fairly  active  but  easier. 
Antimony  and  aluminum  are  both  steady 
and  unchanged. 

Copper. — Developments  in  the  States 
have  sho'wn  no  material  improvement 
and  general  conditions  are  still  more  or 
less  unsettled.  Strikes  at  some  of  the 
mines  have  disturbed  the  American  mar- 
ket and  consumers  still  show  a  reluct- 
ance to  active  interest  under  existing 
conditions.  With  the  exception  of  elec- 
tro, which  has  declined  %  cent  per  lb., 
the  American  market  has  remained  firm. 
The   local   market   on   a   lighter   demand 


has  declined  1  cent  per  lb.,  the  current 
quotations  being  33  cents  for  lake  and 
electrolytic,    and    32    cents   for   castings. 

Tin. — The  market  is  firm  on  better 
demand  and  inquiries  seem  to  indicate 
that  consumers  are  taking  a  more  ac- 
tive interest  in  the  situation.  These 
conditions  have  had  the  effect  of  steady- 
ing the  market  and  prices  have  been 
well  maintained.  The  New  York  mar- 
ket is  stronger  with  prices  Vs  cent 
higher  than  last  week.  Local  dealers 
report  a  featureless  situation  with 
prices  firm  and  unchanged  at  61%  cents 
per  lb. 

Spelter. — Unsettled  conditions  contin- 
ue to  influence  the  spelter  situation  and 
dullness  is  still  a  factor  of  the  present 
market:  The  American  market  is  quiet 
and  dealers  here  report  unchanged  con- 
ditions at  last  week's  price  of  10y2  cents 
per  lb. 

Lead. — With  the  prospect  of  a  better 
supply,  products  are  satisfied  that  the 
time  has  arrived  for  some  readjustment 
of  the  market,  and  this  has  been  reflect- 


MARKET     LETTER    DEVELOP- 
MENT 

The  attention  of  metal  working 
plant  executives  is  directed  to  the 
enlargement  of  the  scope  and  use- 
fulness of  our  Market  Letter  De- 
partment. In  New  York  and  Pitts- 
burgh, expert  correspondents  have 
been  engaged,  and  are  already 
furnishing  each  week  concise  re- 
ports of  production  activities,  price 
movements,  etc.,  within  the  terri- 
tory served  by  each  of  these  im- 
portant centres.  During  the  next 
few  weeks,  further  additions  will 
be  made  to  the  number  of  our 
United  States  correspondents,  em- 
bracing other  industrial  centres, 
and  enlarging  thereby  the  scope 
of  the  meantime  service  being  ren- 
dered. 


expected  that  considerable  second  hand 
machinery  would  be  placed  on  the  mar- 
ket, but  in  view  of  the  unsettled  condi- 
tion of  the  industrial  situation  it  is  not 
likely  that  this  will  be  effected  for  some 
little  time.  The  feature  of  the  present 
market  is  the  marked  decline  in  the  de- 
mand for  supplies,  particularly  such  re- 
quirements as  were  necessary  for  carry- 
ing on  the  extensive  shellmaking  oper- 
ations of  recent  months.  The  market  in 
these  accessories  is  however  compara- 
tively quiet,  no  appreciable  decline  hav- 
ing as  yet  been  reported  in  price  condi- 
tions. 

Scrap 
Owing  to  the  prevailing  conditions  in 
the  industrial  field  at  the  present  time 
the  market  in  old  metals  is  very  unset- 
tled and  prices  are  correspondingly  un- 
certain. The  tendency  in  the  old  metals 
is  towards  lower  levels,  but  the  situation 
in  iron  and  steel  scrap  is  well  main- 
tained in  spite  of  the  decline  in  shell  re- 
quirements. American  iron  and  steel 
markets  are  very  firm  while  metal  scrap 
is  weaker.  The  local  situation  h  feat- 
ured by  a  certain  nervousness  as  a  re- 
sult of  recent  developments;  old  coppers 
are  easier  on  a  decline  of  2  cents,  the 
quotation  this  week  ranging  from  20 
cents  for  light  to  23%  for  heavy  and 
crucible.  Heavy  brass  is  2  cents  weaker 
at  16  cents.  Steel  turnings  are  stronger, 
havinc;  advanced  one  cent.  Five  cents 
per  lb.  records,  the  advance  on  boiler 
plate,  W.  I.  axles  and  rails,  and  also 
malleable  scrap,  the  present  quotations 
being  22  cents,  30  cents,  25  cents  and 
25  cents  respectively.  Scrap  zinc  has  de- 
clined Ws  cents  per  lb.,  the  prince  quot- 
ed being  6V2  cents  per  lb.  Heavy  lead 
is  one  cent  lower  at  10  cents  per  lb. 
Aluminum  at  30  cents  shows  a  decline 
of  5  cents  per  lb. 


ed  in  the  announcement  of  the  leading 
interests  to  lower  their  quotation  to 
10%  cents  per  lb.;  on  a  quiet  market 
dealers  here  have  declined  their  prices 
to  13  cents,  this  being  %  cent  lower  than 
last  week. 

Antimony. — ^The  situation  is  dominat- 
ed by  pending  developments  and  ab- 
sence of  demand,  but  prices  continue 
firm;  15  cents  is  quoted  in  New  York,  a 
decline  on  the  week  of  Vi  cent.  Locally 
the  mai-ket  quiet  with  prices  firm  at  20 
cents  per  lb. 

Aluminum. — iDespite    an    easier    mar- 
ket in  the   States  the  local   situation   is 
firm     and    unchanged     with     quotations 
ranging  from  65  to  67  cents  per  lb. 
Machine   Tools   and    Supplies 

The  machine  tool  market  has  experi- 
enced another  week  of  comparative  in- 
activity with  a  slight  improvement  over 
the  business  of  last  week.  Inquiries  are 
still  coming  in  for  general  line  of  equip- 
ment but  the  sales  are  not  heavy.  With 
the  falling  off  in  munitions  it  might  be 


Toronto,  Ont.,  Sept.  4. — The  machinery 
exhibit  at  the  Canadian  National  Exhibi- 
tion, now  being  held  here,  is  in  general 
character  similar  to  that  of  pre-war 
years.  There  are  no  exhibits  showing 
munitions  machinery  or  equipment  ex- 
clusively, and  in  this  respect  it  is  in  line 
with  the  last  developments  in  the  ma- 
chine tool  business.  An  interesting  fea- 
ture, and  one  showing  possibilities  of 
considerable  development,  is  the  exhibi- 
tion of  farm  tractors.  These  are  being 
used  extensively  now,  and  are  bound  to 
become  more  popular  as  they  improve  in 
design  and  workmanship. 
Steel 

The  situation  in  the  iron  and  steel 
trade  is  practically  unchanged  from  last 
week,  and  prices  continue  stationary, 
with  a  weaker  tendency.  It  is  understood 
that  some  progress  is  being  made  in  re- 
gard to  the  adjustment  of  the  embargo 
on  steel  from  the  United  States,  but  no 
announcement  has  been  made  regarding 
the  progress  of  negotiations.  No  official 
statement  has  been  given  out  from 
Washington  concerning  the  U.S.  Govern- 
ment price  fixing:  policy,  although  a  pub- 
lic announcement  of  maximum  prices  for 
various  grades  of  steel  from  certain  mills 
is  expected  shortly.  It  is  believed  that 
steel  prices  will  be  fixed  by  the  War  In- 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


281 


dustries  Board  on  a  cost-plus-profit  basis, 
but  whether  or  not  this  will  be  extended 
to  include  steel  for  private  consumers  is 
not  known.  In  the  meantime  the  mar- 
ket is  unsettled,  with  new  business  al- 
most at  a  standstill.  Consumers  are  buy- 
ing: as  little  material  as  possible  in  the 
hope  of  lower  prices,  and  are  waiting  un- 
til the  situation  clears  up.  There  is  still 
a  shortage  of  steel,  but  some  relief  is 
looked  for  now  that  the  mills  have  more 
tonnage  available  for  domestic  require- 
ments. This  will  also  to  some  extent  re- 
lieve the  tight  situation  caused  by  the 
embargo.  The  Canadian  mills  with  their 
increased  capacity  will  be  in  a  better 
position  than  ever  before  to  supply  the 
demands  of  the  home  market.  Produc- 
tion has  shown  an  increase  lately  on  ac- 
count of  the  cooler  weather,  but  the  coke 
situation  continues  to  cause  considerable 
anxiety  and  the  steel  output  may  be  cur- 
tailed because  of  this  unless  supplies  of 
coke  can  be  steadily  maintained,  which 
at  the  present  moment  appears  rather 
doubtful. 

In  the  United  States  market,  demands 
for  war  purposes,  and  particularly  for 
shipbuilding,  are  more  than  sufficient  to 
keep  all  steel  producers  working  at  the 
limit  of  capacity.  There  is  not  enough 
steel  to  meet  all  demands,  and  with  Gov- 
ernment and  Allies  requirements  having 
to  be  filled  before  the  private  consumer 
can  participate,  the  latter  has  to  take 
what  he  can  get.  Private  enterprise  is 
consequently  considerably  restricted. 
For  this  reason,  and  because  of  the  pre- 
vailing high  prices,  domestic  business  is 
slow.  The  trade  is  waiting  developments 
at  Washington,  and  until  the  price  fixing 
policy  is  settled  no  important  change  in, 
the  situation  is  anticipated.  Prices  con- 
tinue to  show  an  easier  tendency,  parti- 
cularly on  semi-finished  material,  and 
further  declines  are  looked  for.  Produc- 
tion is  being  curtailed  because  of  lack 
of  men  and  shortage  of  raw  materials. 
There  is  a  serious  deficiency  in  supplies 
of  pig  iron  and  semi-finished  steel  at 
some  important  plants.  The  sheet  mar- 
ket continues  active,  with  buying  prin- 
cipally for  U.  S.  Government  account. 
Prices  in  the  home  market  are  un- 
changed. 

Pig  Iron 

The  situation  in  the  domestic  pig  iron 
market  is  unchanged,  and  prices  of  foun- 
dry iron  continue  nominal  at  $60  a  ton. 
Considerable  difficulty  is  being  experi- 
enced in  getting  coke  in  sufficient  quanti- 
ties owing  to  the  scarcity  of  car>.  On 
the  other  side  of  the  line  there  is  a  heavy 
demand  for  pig  iron,  and  the  furnaces 
are  having  difficulty  in  completing  con- 
tracts. Deliveries  are  somewhat  delayed, 
but  production  is  improving  with  cooler 
weather.  Coke  production  is  increasing, 
but  shortage  of  cars  is  holding  prices 
firm.  The  trade  is  expecting  an  an- 
nouncement from  Washington  within  a 
short  time  as  to  the  price  at  which  coke 
is  to  be  sold.  In  view  of  possible  Gov- 
ernment control  of  the  coke  market, 
lower  prices  are  anticipated.' 
Scrap 

The  market  for  old  materials  continues 
quiet  at  unchanged  prices,  but  a  mod- 
erate  recession   in  values  is   likely,   par- 


ticularly in  copper  and  brass.  Steel 
and  cast  iron  scrap  are  in  good  demand 
and  the  prices  have  been  well  main- 
tained on  the  basis  of  last  week's  quot- 
ations. Supplies  of  shell  steel  turnings 
now  considerably  reduced  in  volume  are 
being  readily  absorbed  with  prices  show- 
ing a  firmer  tendency.  The  new  steel 
plant  at  Ashbridge's  Bay  is  using  con- 
siderable of  this  material  and  dealers' 
stocks  are  not  by  any  means,  as  heavy 
as  they  were  a  few  months  ago. 
Machine  Tools 
The  past  week  has  been  fairly  quiet 
in  the  machine  tool  trade  in  regard  to 
sales,  although  the  Machinery  Hall  at 
the  local  exhibition  has  been  the  centre 
of  considerable  activity.  The  trend  of 
events  in  the  trade  is  reflected  in  the 
exhibits  as  there  is  comparatively  little 
machinery  or  equipment  being  shown 
that  would  be  required  exclusively  in  the 
manufacture  of  shells.  In  this  respect 
the  exhibits  follow  more  along  the  lines 
of  pre-war  times  than  last  year. 


CANADIAN    GOVERNMENT 
PURCHASING  COMMISSION 

The  following  gentlemen  consti- 
tute the  Commission  appointed  to 
make  all  purchases  under  the  Do- 
minion $100,000,000  war  appropri- 
ation:— Georgje  F.  Gait,  Winnipeg; 
Hormidas  Laporte,  Montreal;  A. 
E.  Kemp,  Toronto.  Thomas  Hil- 
liard  is  secretary,  and  the  Commis- 
sion headquarters  are  at  Ottawa. 


Supplies 

Although  there  has  been  lately  some 
falling  off  in  demand  for  machine  shop 
supplies,  business  continues  in  steady 
volume.  The  difficulty  now  is  to  obtain 
goods  promptly  and  dealers  are  obliged 
to  place  their  orders  well  ahead  which 
means  carrying  considerable  stocks. 
Prices  on  all  lines  are  holding  very  firm 
with  advances  on  some  goods.  Due  to 
recent  advances  in  the  price  of  Mid- 
Continent  oil  to  $2.00  a  barrel,  there  is 
a  firm  situation  in  the  refined  products 
such  as  gasoline,  benzine,  and  coal  oil. 
The  heavy  consumption  is  an  additional 
factor  that  is  giving  firmness  to  the 
market.  Prices  of  gasoline  and  benzine 
are  unchanged. 

Metals 

Comparatively  little  interest  is  being 
displayed  by  consumers  in  metals  and 
the  markets  are  quiet.  The  reason  for 
the  lack  of  interest  is  the  uncertainty 
surrounding  the  United  States  Govern- 
ment's attitude  with  regard  to  nrices. 
There  is  some  apprehension  in  the  trade 
in  regard  to  future  developments  and 
the  markets  are  consequently  easier  al- 
though prices  are  unchanged  in  the 
meantime.  The  local  situation  is  un- 
changed from  last  week  and  the  market 
continues   somewhat   unsettled. 

Copper. — The  market  is  neglected  and 
no  business  of  consequence  is  now  offer- 
ing.     Production    is    the    U.S.    is    being 


seriously  interfered  with  by  labor 
troubles  at  the  mines,  some  of  which 
are  said  to  have  closed  down.  The  larger 
producers  are  practically  out  of  the  mar- 
ket and  there  is  some  fear  that  the  sup- 
ply will  be  insufficient  to  permit  copper  - 
to  be  used  for  any  purpose  other  than 
for  munitions  and  war  equipment.  Prices 
are  entirely  nominal  and  unchanged, 
lake  and  electrolytic  being  quoted  at 
34c  and  castings  at  33c  per  pound. 

Tin. — The  miarket  is  quiet  with  no 
feature  of  particular  interest  to  note. 
Business  is  dull  owing  to  uncertainty  in 
the  situation  in  London,  where  the  mar- 
ket has  been  subject  to  considerable  fluc- 
tuation.    Local  price  64c  per  pound. 

Spelter. — The  spelter  situation  con- 
tinues unsettled  and  the  market  has  an 
easier  tendency.  It  is  said  that  produc- 
tion has  fallen  off  considerably  on  ac- 
count of  the  inability  of  producers  to 
sell  spelter  at  a  profit  at  current  prices. 
Local   price  lie  per  pound. 

Lead. — ^The  market  is  very  quiet  but 
has  a  fairly  strong  undertone  and  prices 
are  holding  steady.  Consumers  are 
keeping  out  of  the  market  pending  de- 
velopments at  Washington.  Local  situ- 
ation  at   13c  per   pound. 

Antimony. — The  market  is  still  quiet 
and  prospects  are  not  too  bright  for 
immediate  improvement.  Prices  are  un- 
changed at  20c  per  pound. 

Aluminum. — Little  interest  is  shown 
in  aluminum  and  the  market  is  rather 
unsettled  with  an  easier  undertone. 
Price  64c  per  pound. 

Sydney,  N.S.,  Aug.  31.— The  coal  pro- 
duction at  the  Glace  Bay  collieries  of  the 
Dominion  Coal  Company  during  August 
reached  only  296,000  tons,  this  being  the 
smallest  tonnage  recorded  in  August 
since  1904,  with  the  exception  of  August, 
1909,  when  the  output  was  reduced  by 
the  U.M.W.  strike.  Indications  are  that 
the  Dominion  Coal  Co.  production  for  the 
whole  year  1917  will  not  exceed  3,950,000 
tons,  which  will  compare  with  4,440,000 
tons  in  1916,  and  is  at  least  1,500,000 
tons  below  the  capacity  of  the  collieries 
for  output  with  a  full  working  force. 
This  is  the  chief  reason  for  the  shortage 
of  soft  coal  deliveries  in  Montreal.  It  is 
true  that  great,  almost  insuperable,  diffi- 
culties have  been  encountered  in  trans- 
porting to  Montreal  even  the  negligible 
quantity  of  Cape  Breton  coal  that  has 
gone  up  the  river  this  season,  but  pre- 
sumably, if  the  coal  had  been  available, 
it  would  have  been  carried  to  Montreal 
by  one  means  or  another.  As  sonie  indi- 
cation of  transportation  conditions,  it 
may  be  mentioned  that  coal  is  being  sent 
in  cars  by  rail  from  Cape  Breton  to  St. 
John,  N.B. 

The  slackening  in  munitions  manufac- 
ture has  affected  Nova  Scotia.  The  stop- 
page of  orders  is  chiefly  for  shrapnel 
steel  and  forgings  for  shrapnel  shells. 
The  Nova  Scotia  Steel  &  Coal  Co.  laid 
off  some  one  thousand  men  on  this  ac- 
count at  New  Glasgow,  although  it  is  un- 
derstood that  most  of  them  can  be  given 
work  of  a  different  class  at  lower  wages. 
The  Dominion  Iron-  &  Steel  Co.  have  tem- 
porarily disccntinued  work  at  the  sixteen 


282 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIIl. 


inch  mill,  where  shrapnel  steel  was 
rolled,  and  orders  are  slack  in  other  de- 
partments. It  is  evident  that  a  readjust- 
ment period  has  been  entered  upon.  Un- 
der present  conditions  there  will  be  no 
difficulty  in  finding  employment  for  all 
the  workmen  in  Nova  Scotia,  but  they 
will  have  to  be  prepared  to  take  other 
work  and  usually  at  much  lower  wages 
than  the  high  rates  that  have  been  paid 
during  the  past  year  and  a  half.  There 
seems  to  be  no  doubt  that  the  Admiralty 
is  concentrating  its  energies  on  supply- 
ing- foodstuffs  to  Britain  and  her  Allies, 
and  the  necessity  for  munitions  now 
takes  second  place.  The  control  of  ship- 
ping by  the  Admiralty  prevents  the  ex- 
port of  munitions  if  foodstuffs  are  to  be 
given  preference,  and  this  seems  to  be 
the  real  explanation  of  the  slackening  in 
munitions  orders. 

The  rules  recently  promulgated  by  the 
United  States  requiring  licenses  for  all 
exported  materials  is  temporarily  ren- 
dering difficult  construction  work  in  Can- 
ada, which  depends  on  the  supplying  of 
material  from  the  United  States,  and  this 
is  affecting  the  extension  plans  of  the 
steel  companies.  It  is  rumored  the  Nova 
Scotia  Steel  Company  intends  to  enlarge 
its  coke-oven  plant  at  Sydney  Mines.  The 
coke-oven  plant  now  under  erection  at 
the  works  of  the  Dominion  Iron  &  Steel 
Co.  is  making  fair  progress. 


New  York,  Sept.  3. — Business  in  the 
steel  industry  continues  to  be  confined 
mainly  to  the  filling  of  Government 
contracts.  Thus  far  the  steel  mills  have 
received  orders  amounting  to  3,200,000 
tons  from  the  Government  either  direct- 
ly or  indirectly;  approximately  75  per 
cent,  of  this  tonnage  has  been  accepted 
by  the  United  States  Steel  Corporation. 
The  subsidiary  companies  of  the  Corpor- 
ation will  furnish  the  steel  for  11,000 
cars  to  be  built  in  this  country  for  the 
double  track  railroad  in  France  which 
is  being  built  and  equipped  in  the  inter- 
est of  the  United  States  army.  The 
Corporation  is  also  rolling  90,000  tons 
steel  rails  for  this  road  -  and  10,000  of 
light  sections  of  the  20,000  tons  pur- 
chased for  portable  tracks  in  France. 
The  corporation  will  also  furnish  800,- 
000  tons  of  the  steel  to  be  used  in  the 
construction  of  war  ships  by  the  United 
States   Navy   and  by  merchant   yards. 

The  United  States  Government  is  also 
endeavoring  to  place  steel  orders  for 
10,000  additional  cars  to  be  built  here 
and  exported  to  France,  most  of  the 
material  for  which  will  be  distributed 
among  independent  steel  companies  that 
thus  far  have  not  accepted  their  full 
share  of  Government  work.  Several  in- 
dependent mills  in  the  past  few  days 
have  received  orders  for  a  large  tonnage 
of  steel  plates  and  shapes  required  in 
the  building  of  cargo  boats  by  the  Em- 
ergency Fleet  Corporation  and  this  steel 
will  be  shipped  to  the  plants  of  the  Am- 
erican International  Corporation  who 
will  build  200  steel  ships;  to  the  Sub- 
marine Boat  Corporation  who  will  build 
28  standardized  steel  ships,  and  to  the 
p'ints  of  the  Chester  Shipbuilding  Co. 
and  to  the  Merchants  Shipbuilding  Cor- 


poration. The  building  of  these  boats 
will  require  4.32,000  tons  of  plates  and 
shapes.  Only  a  portion  of  this  tonnage 
has  been  placed;  but  the  balance  will 
probably  be  distributed  early  next  year. 

The  United  States  Shipping  Board  has 
now  closed  contracts  for  701  ships — 
steel,  wood,  and  composite.  The 
Emergency  Fleet  Corporation  of  the 
Board  now  has  ships  of  3,250,000  tons 
burden  either  building  or  under  con- 
tract, which  will  call  for  the  expenditure 
of  nearly  $600,000,000,  and  additional 
contracts  for  571  ships  are  under  nego- 
tiation. As  noted  early  last  month,  the 
full  program  of  the  Emergency  Fleet 
Corporation  calls  for  the  building  of 
1,727  ships  of  7,968,200  tons  displace- 
ment to  cost  $1,234,500,000.  The  Ship- 
ping Board's  commandeering  program 
of  ships  already  on  the  ways  at  merch- 
ant yards,  calls  for  the  expenditure  of 
$515,000,000.  Ships  bought  or  to  be 
purchased  call  for  the  expenditure  of 
$150,000,000.  Shipyards  to  be  built  by 
or  for  the  Government  in  which  to  build 
standardized  ships  will  require  the  ex- 
penditure of  $35,000,000.  Congress 
thus  far  has  appronriated  $800,000,000 
for  the  use  of  the  Shipping  Board,  but 
as  nearly  $2,000,000,000  will  be  needed, 
the  Board  has  now  asked  for  an  addi- 
tional appropriation  of  $1,134,500,000  of 
which  $915,000,000  is  to  become  avail- 
able this  year. 

The  various  shipyards  that  received 
contracts  from  the  Government  on  the 
last  day  of  August  have  been  anticipat- 
ing this  work  by  the  purchase  of  cranes 
and  machine  tools  in  the  last  few  weeks. 
The  Federal  Shipbuilding  Co.  has  also 
made  additional  tool  purchases,  and  the 
Pusev  &  .Tones  Co.  is  about  to  issue  a 
list  of  tools  for  a  new  machine  shop  to 
be  built   at   Wilmington,  Delaware. 

Orders  for  about  one  million  dollars 
worth  of  machinery  have  been  placed  in 
the  last  week  in  the  New  York  market, 
and  lists  have  been  put  out  by  various 
manufacturers  of  airplanes  and  air- 
plane ensrines  callinfr  for  the  expendi- 
ture of  $3,000,000  including  $1,000,000 
worth  of  tools  for  the  Inter-Continental 
Machinery  Cor^^vn'-inn.  The  Standard 
Aero  Corporation,  Plainfield,  N.J.,  is  in 
the  market  for  $300,000  worth  of  metal 
and  wood-working  machinery  to  be  used 
in  equipping  an  airplane  factory.  The 
Simplex-Automobile  Co.,  is  closing  for 
100  machine  tools  to  be  used  on  Govern- 
ment work.  Several  manufacturers  of 
automobiles  who  have  accepted  con- 
tracts for  aviation  motors  have  been 
buying  tools  in  the  New  York,  Chicago, 
Detroit,  and  Cleveland  markets.  The 
United  States  Aircraft  Production 
Board  and  the  French  and  Russian  Gov- 
ernments are  also  buying  tools  to  build 
airplane  engines. 


'  Pittsburgh,  Sept.  1. — Further  pro- 
gress towards  a  general  readjustment  in 
iron  and  steel  prices  has  been  made  in  the 
past  week,  although  the  surface  evidences 
are  not  spectacular  in  character.  Billets 
are  off  another  $5  a  ton,  Bessemer  iron  is 
down,   say,   $1    a    ton    and  basic   iron   is 


lower  by  about  $4  a  ton,  while  plates  have 
been  eased  off  by  about  a  cent  a  pound, 
other  finished  steel  products  not  being 
quotably  changed.  Under  the  surface, 
however,  the  forces  are  working  out,  the 
mills  having  filled  additional  obligations 
and  having  so  much  less  ahead  of  them, 
while  the  export  embargo  is  making  steel 
more  plentiful  and  there  is  constant  senti- 
mental pressure  from  Washington  in  the 
direction  of  lower  prices. 

The  New  Export  Embargo 
The  first  export  embargo,  which  became 
effective  July  15,  applied  to  all  countries 
and  included,  as  to  iron  and  steel,  the 
following  items;  scrap,  pig  iron  and  ferro- 
manganese,  billets,  ship  plates  and  struc- 
tural steel.  The  new  embargo,  dated 
Augst  27,  to  become  effective  August  30, 
is  in  two  sections,  the  first  applying  to  the 
Central  Powers  and  the  countries  adja- 
cent, the  latter  to  the  rest  of  the  world, 
including  the  Entente  Allies  and  their  de- 
pendencies, protectorates,  etc.,  and  the 
neutrals  not  contiguous  to  the  Central 
Powers.  The  list  as  to  the  former  in- 
cludes practically  everything,  certainly  all 
iron  and  steel,  there  being  the  compre- 
hensive wording,  metals  and  their  deriva- 
tives and  manufacturers.  The  list  as  to 
the  latter  includes  scrap,  pig  iron,  ferro- 
silicon,  spiegeleisen,  ferromanganese,  in- 
gots, blooms,  billets,  slabs  and  sheet  bars, 
plates,  structural  shapes,  tool  steel,  alloy 
steel  and  machine  tools."  This  would 
apply  to  Canada,  of  course.  The  import- 
ant omissions  are  wire  products,  pipe, 
sheets,  tin  ulates  and  merchant  bars.  The 
Exports  Administrative  Board  has  been 
organized  to  grant  licenses,  licensing 
under  the  former  embargo  having  been  in 
charge  of  the  Denartment  of  Commerce. 
The  object  of  the  first  part  of  the  em- 
bargo is.  of  course,  to  prevent  anv  mater- 
ial poing,  directlv  or  indirectlv.  from  the 
United  States  to  the  Central  Powers.  The 
object  of  the  second  is  to  conserve  the 
supplies  of  the  United  States,  permitting 
material  to  go  out  only  in  case  it  is  to  be 
used  directly  in  prosecuting  the  war. 
The  Coal  Situation 
As  noted  in  last  report,  the  bituminous 
coal  operators  were  much  dissatisfied  with 
the  schedule  of  prices  fixed  bv  President 
Wilson  on  August  21,  and  had  called  a 
p-eneral  meeting  of  operators  to  be  held  in 
Pittsburgh  August  29.  Evidently  they 
concluded  on  second  thought  that  a  gen- 
eral meeting,  at  which  there  would  pro- 
bably be  explosive  utterances,  would  not 
be  a  good  path  into  the  good  graces  of  the 
Government,  hence  the  meeting  was  called 
off  and  the  executive  officials  of  the  re- 
centlv  formed  Coal  Producers'  Associa- 
tion have  been  meeting  in  Washington  to 
formulate  plans  for  making  representa- 
tions to  the  Government. 

No  announcement  has  vet  been  made 
rep-arding  the  fixing  of  coke  prices.  Con- 
nellsville  furnace  coke  for  snot  shipment 
is  strong  to-day  at  $13.50  per  net  ton  at 
ovens. 

Pig  Iron 
A  pig  iron  producer  has  bought  several 
odd  lots  of  Bessemer  iron  at  $50  and  $52, 
valley,  the  market  a  week  ago  having  been 
quotable  at  $53.  Basic  iron,  which  was 
quotable  at  $52,  valley,  can  probably  be 


September  6,  1917. 


Ci^NADIAN    MACHINERY 


secured  without  difficulty  at  $48.  Foun- 
dry grades  are  nominally  unchanged.  In 
other  districts  there  is  a  generally  softer 
tone,  but  as  a  rule  there  is  not  enough 
doing  to  place  actual  declines  on  record. 

Billets  Decline  Again 

This  week  billets  were  offered  at  $75, 
finding  few,  if  any,  takers,  and  it  is 
thought  that  a  firm  bid  of  $70  would  bring 
out  some  material.  Last  week's  market 
was  $80,  while  the  top,  reached  at  the  be- 
ginning of  June,  was  $95  to  $100.  The  de- 
cline is  likely  to  go  farther,  but  it  can 
hardly  continue  long  at  the  rate  of  $5  a 
week,  because  it  is  now  approaching  the 
level  at  which  large  contracts  are  being 
filled,  say,  $50  to  $G0.  These  are  long- 
term  contracts,  with  a  quarterly  fixing  of 
prices.  Rods  are  easier  at  $90  and  forg- 
ing billets  can  be  had  at  $95,  whereas  a 
few  weeks  ago  they  were  strong  at  $125. 

A   Decline   in   Plates 

While  scrap  started  to  decline  late  in 
June,  pig  iron  softened  a  trifle  in  July  and 
billets  began  declining  in  August,  there 
has  been  no  quotable  decline  in  any 
finished  steel  product  until  this  week, 
when  the  distinction  can  be  accorded  to 
plates.  Until  very  lately  it  has  been  diffi- 
cult to  buy  even  ordinary  tank  plate  at  9c., 
the  more  common  quotation  being  lOc, 
Lloyds'  specifications  commanding  about 
12c.  In  the  past  week  there  have  been 
rather  free  offerings  of  tank  plate  at  8c., 
and  in  a  few  instances  at  a  shade  less. 
Thus  an  eastern  mill  sold  400  tons,  %-inch 
and  heavier,  60  to  80  inches  wide,  at  a 
delivered  price  equal  to  7.85c.,  Pittsburgh, 
but  as  the  freight  was  against  the  mill 
the  price  realized  at  mill  was  only  7.70c. 

The  softening  in  plates  is  commonly 
ascribed  to  the  export  embargo,  which  has 
shut  in  some  large  tonnages,  particularly 
in  the  case  of  Japanese  orders.  However, 
there  is  probably  a  contributory  influence, 
in  that  mills  can  now  make  a  better  ap- 
praisal of  how  much  plate  tonnage  the 
shipbuilding  program  will  absorb.  The 
requirements  of  the  next  few  months  are 
much  smaller  than  those  expected  when 
various  shipyards  have  been  completed. 
At  that  time  there  will  be  additional  plate 
rolling  capacity.  Then  there  is  a  new 
element  in  the  situation,  the  Secretary  of 
the  Navy  insisting  upon  the  building  of 
150  destroyers  as  quickly  as  possible,  even 
to  the  detriment  of  the  merchant  ship- 
building programme.  It  is  stated  this  is 
on  the  advice  of  Admiral  Simms,  in  charge 
of  United  States  naval  operations  abroad, 
and  in  considerable  measure  it  would 
serve  to  reduce  the  consumption  of  plates 
for  a  time. 

Government    Price    Fixing 

Another  week  has  passed  without  the 
Government  fixing  the  prices  it  is  to  pay 
for  steel,  but  an  early  announcement  is 
promised  with  more  assurance  than  form- 
erly. Then  there  will  be  the  question  of 
prices  to  be  accorded  the  Entente  Allies, 
on  which  matter  the  steel  makers  have  not 
yet  f  oiTnally  yielded.  When  the  prices  are 
fixed,  it  may  prove  to  be  the  signal  for  the 
beginning  of  a  general  decline  in  finished 
steel  prices  for  the  ordinary  trade.  While 
the  steel  makers  have  never  subscribed 
to  the  "one  price  for  all"  doctrine  enunci- 


Enlarged  Canadian  Trade  Intelligence 
Service 

Under  the  arraneenient  made  by  the  Minister  of  Trade  and  Commerce  with  Sir 
Edward  Gre.T  in  July,  1913,  the  Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce,  Ottawa,  Is 
able  to  present  the  following  libt  of  the  more  important  British  Consulates  whose 
officers  have  been  Instructed  by  the  Foreign  Office  to  answer  inquiries  from  and  give 
information  to  Canadians  who  wish  to  consult  them  In  reference  to  trade  matters. 


BRAZIL— Babia,  British  Consul.  Rio  de 
Jaueiro,  British  Consul  General. 

CHILE  —  Valparaiso,  British  Consul 
(ieueral. 

COLOMBIA  —  Bagota,  British  Consul 
General. 

ECUADOR— Quito,  British  Consul  Gen- 
eral.    Guayquil,  British  Consul. 


FRANCE— Havre,  British  Consul  General. 
Marseilles,    British    Consul    General. 

INDIA — Calcutta,  Director  General  of 
Commercial   Intelligence. 

ITALY — Genoa,  British  Consul  General. 
Milan,  British   Consul. 

MEXICO— Mexico,  British  Consul  Gen- 
eral. 


NETHERLANDS— Amsterdam,  British 
Consul. 

PANAMA— Colon,  British  Consul.  Pana- 
ma, British  Vice-Consul. 

PERU— Lima.    British   Vice-ConS'Ul. 

PORTUGAL- Lisbon,    British    Consul. 

KUSSI.\— Moscow,  British  Consul  Gen- 
eral, i'etrograd,  British  Consul,  Vla- 
divostock,  British  Consul.  Odessa, 
British   Consul  General. 

SPAIN — Barcelona,  British  Consul  Gen- 
eral.    Madrid,  British  Consul. 

SWEDEN— Stoclih^lm.  British   Consul. 

SWITZERLAND— Geneva,  British  Consul. 

URUGUAY— Monte  Video,  British  Vice- 
Consul. 

VENEZUELA  —  Caracas,  British  Vice- 
Consul. 


Canadian  Commercial  Intelligence 
Service 

The  Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce  invites  correspondence  from  Canadian 
exporters  er  importers  upon  all  trade  matters.  Canadian  Trade  Commissioners  and 
Commercial  Agents  should  be  licpt  supplied  with  catalogues,  price  lists,  discount 
rates,  etc.,  and  the  names  and  addresses  of  trade  representatives  by  Canadian  export- 
ers. Catalogues  should  state  whether  prices  are  at  factory  point,  f.o.b.  at  port  of 
shipment,  or,  which  is  preferable,  c.i.f.  at  foreign  port. 

CANADIAN    TRADE    COMMISSIONERS. 

ARGENTINE  REPUBLIC— B.  S.  Webb,  Acting  Canadian  Trade  Commissioner,  Recon- 
quista.  No.  46,  Buenos  Aires.    Cable  address,  Canadian. 

AUSTRALIA— D.  H  Ross,  Stock  Exchange  Building,  Melbourne.  Cable  address. 
Canadian. 

BRITISH  WEST  INDIES— E.  H.  S.  Flood.  Bridgetown,  Barbadoes,  agent  also  for  the 
Bermudas  and   British   Guiana.      Cable  address,  Canadian. 

CHINA — .T.  W.  Ross.  13  Nanking  Road,  Shanghai.     Cable  address,  Cancoma. 

CUB.\ — Acting  Canadian  Trade  Commissioner,  Lonja  del  Commerci,  Apartado  1290, 
Havana.     Cable  address,  Cantracom. 

FR.^NCE— Phlllipe  Roy,  Commissioner  General,  17  and  19  Boulevard  des  Capuclnes, 
Paris.     Cable  address,  Stadacoua. 

ITALY— W.  Mc.  Clarke,   c/o   H.  M.  Consul,  Milan. 

JAPAN — B.  F.  Crowe,  .\cting  Canadian  Trade  Commissioner,  P.  O.  Box  109,  Yoko- 
hama.    Cable  address,  Canadian. 

IIOLL.\ND — Ph.  Geleerd,  Acting  Canadian  Trade  Commissioner,  Zuidblaak,  26,  Rotter- 
dam.    Cable  address,    Watermill. 

RUSSIA — C.  P.  Just,  Canij„dian  Government  Commercial  Agent,  Alexandrlnskala, 
Plosch  9,  Petrograd.  L.  D.  Wilgress.  Canadian  Government  Commercial  Agent, 
Bukhgolza  UUtza   No.  4,  Omsk,  Siberia. 

NEWFOUNDLAND— W.  W.  Nicholson,  Bank  of  Montreal  Building.  Water  Street,  St. 
John's.      Cable  address.  Canadian. 

NEW  ZEALAND— W.  A.  Beddoe,  Union  Buildings,  Customs  Street,  Auckland.  Cable 
address.   Canadian. 

SOUTH  AFRICA— W.  J.  Egan,  Norwich  Union  Buildings,  Cape  Town.  Cable  address, 
Cantracom. 

CNITED  KINGDOM— Harrison  Watson,  Rub-division  EC.  2,  73  Basinghall  Street, 
London,  E.C..  England.  Cable  address.  Sleighing.  London.  N.  D.  Johnston.  Sun 
Building.  Clare  Street.  Bristol.  Cable  address,  Canadian.  J.  E.  Ray.  Central 
House.  Birmingham.  Cable  address.  Canadian.  J.  Forsyth  Smith.  31  North 
John  Street,  Liverpool.  Cable  address,  Cantracom.  F.  A.  C.  Blckerdlke,  4  St. 
Ann's  Square,  Manchester.  Cable  address.  Cantracom.  J.  Forsyth  Smith,  Acting 
Canadian  Trade  Commissioner,  87  Union  Street,  Glasgow,  Scotland.  Cable  ad- 
dress,   Contracom. 

CANADIAN  COM.MERCIAI.  AGENTS 

AUSTRALIA— B.  Mlllln.   Royal  Exchange  Building,  Sydney.   N.S.W. 

BRITISH    WEST    INDIES— Edgar    Tripp,    Port    of   Spain,    Trinidad.      Cable   address, 

Canadian.     R.  H.  Curry.  Nassau.  Bahamas. 
NORWAY   AND    DENMARK-^C.    E.   Sontum    Grubbegd    No.    4,    Chrlstlania,    Norway. 

Cable  address.   Sontums. 
SP.\IN — J.  F.  Roberts.   Hotel  Cuatro  Naciones,  Barcelona. 

CANADI.4N   HIGH  COMMISSIONER'S  OFFICE 
UNITED    KINGDOM— W.    L.    Griffith.    Secretary,    17    Victoria    Street,    London,    S.W., 

Engl.ind.     Cable  address.  Dominion,  London. 


284 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII 


ated  by  President  Wilson,  the  steel  buyers 
think  the  idea  is  an  excellent  one  and  will 
be  disposed  to  bide  their  time  awaiting  the 
market  to  carry  it  into  effect. 
© 

YEAR'S  WORK  OF  LAKE  SUPERIOR 
CORPORATION 

THE  net  earnings  from  operations  of  all 
of  the  subsidiary  companies  of  the  Lake 
Superior  Corporation  for  the  year  ended 
June  30th  last  were  $5,323,004.86,  com- 
pared with  $3,503,471.18  in  the  previous 
year,  an  increase  of  $1,819,533.68.  To  the 
net  earnings  mentioned  there  was  added 
a  balance  of  $340,087.33  brought  forward 
from  1916,  giving  $5,663,092.19  available 
for  distribution.  Interest  on  bonds  of 
subsidiary  companies  took  $1,419,071.20. 
An  amount  of  $586,485.12  was  set  aside 
for  Magpie  Mine  Reserve  and  for  sink- 
ing fund  payments  in  respect  of  Helen, 
Carmelton,  Lake  Superior  Mines,  Fiborn 
quarries,  etc.  The  losses  and  expenses 
in  connection  with  the  sale  of  miscellan- 
eous assets  reached  the  sum  of  $145,036.- 
01.  The  amount  of  $1,243,155  14  w^s  ap- 
propriated as  reserves  for  depreciation, 
renewals,  etc.,  of  special  assets  (includ- 
ing renewal  of  coke  ovens  and  docks,  as 
also  abnormal  capital  cost  of  construc- 
tion and  equipment),  and  $1,500,000  was 
set  aside  for  general  depreciation.  These 
items  totalled  $4,893,747.77,  and  left  the 
sum  of  $769,344.42  to  be  carried  forward 
by  all  companies. 

The  Algoma  Steel  Company  showed  an 
increase  both  in  the  production  of  pig 
iron  and  unfinished  steel  as  follows: 

1916-17     1915-16 

Pig    iron    348,519     258,504 

Finished  steel 280,296     215,466 

The  output  consisted  of  shell  steel  to- 
gether with  rails  and  merchant  bars. 

The  Algoma  Steel  Corporation  has 
completed  the  two  75-ton  open  hearth 
furnaces  which  it  had  under  way  at  the 
opening  of  the  year  and  has  carried 
through  a  third  furnace  of  the  same  size. 
With  a  possible  production  of  about  50,- 
000  tons  ingots  per  month,  the  directors 
consider  that  they  have  provided  all  the 
steel  making  capacity  necessary  for  some 
time  to  come,  and  that  subject  to  cer- 
tain modernizing  of  the  older  furnaces, 
they  will  have  a  satisfactory  open  hearth 
plant. 

Opportunity  was  taken  to  acquire  the 
modern  blast  furnace  built  at  Midland, 
Ont,  a  few  years  ago,  by  the  Canada 
Iron  Corporation.  This  furnace  has  been 
already  moved  to  Sault  Ste.  Marie  and 
when  erected  and  improved  will  have  an 
approximate  capacity  of  400  tons  per 
day.  With  the  addition  of  the  blast  fur- 
nace plant  and  with  the  ultimate  pos- 
sibility of  operating  four  blast  furnaces, 
the  Algoma  Steel  Corporation  should 
have  a  well  balanced  plant  as  between 
its  pig  iron  and  steel  producing  possibili- 
ties. 

Satisfactory  progress  is  being  made 
with  the  development  of  the  water  power 
by  the  Great  Lakes  Power  Company  and 
the  supply  of  power,  which  will  be  great- 
ly helpful  to  the  ^teel  plant,  is  expected 
to  commence  about  1st  January  next. 

Mr.  Wilfrid  H.  Cunningham,  the  presi- 
dent, says  in  the  course  of  his  report: 


"So  far  as  the  finances  of  the  Algoma 
Steel  Corporation  are  concerned,  it  is 
gratifying  to  be  able  to  report  that  the 
position  of  the  company  has  been  much 
improved,  especially  through  its  having 
pair  off,  in  March,  its  three-year  note  ob- 
ligations ($2,432,000).  A  satisfactory 
sale  was  made  during  the  year,  of  the 
steamship  J.  A.  McKee,  and  of  certain 
office  buildings  and  adjoining  lands.  The 
price  realized  for  steamship  and  lands 
approximated  $750,000,  all  of  which  is  or 
will  be  deposited  with  the  trustees  and 
will  be  available  for  further  capital  ex- 
penditure. 

"Favorable  reports  have  been  received 
as  to  the  coal  mines.  In  view  of  the 
growing  importance  of  these,  the  Lake 
Superior  and  Cannelton  Coal  Companies 
have  opened  an  office  in  Cleveland,  from 
which  Mr.  W.  C.  Franz,  the  president  of 
those  companies,  will  conduct  operations. 

"The  present  Helen  Iron  Mine  is  still 
producing,  but  the  operation  cannot  be 
prolonged  much  further  on  account  of 
the  exhaustion  of  the  Hematite  ore.  A 
considerable  amount  of  diamond  drilling 
has  been  done  on  the  property  during  the 
year,  with  the  result  that  a  substantial 
tonnage  of  Siderite  has  been  proved  up. 
There  are  no  further  developments  at 
Magpie  Mine.  Labor  conditions  have 
been  unsatisfactory. 

"Beyond  progressing  with  their  plans 
the  Algoma  Steel  Corporation  directors 
have  not  yet  committed  the  company  to 
construction  work  in  connection  with 
either  structural  or  other  mills.  They 
consider  that  prices  and  deliveries  are 
adverse  to  such  work  at  present.  The 
necessity  for  further  mill  development  is, 
however,  again  very  strongly  emphasiz- 
ed. 

"In  the  disposition  of  earnings  for  the 
year,  the  board  of  the  Algoma  Steel  Cor- 
poration has  deemed  it  wise,  especially 
under  the  present  conditions,  to  pursue  a 
thoroughly  conservative  policy.  In  addi- 
tion to  the  necessary  sinking  funds,  care 
has  been  taken  to  provide  for  such  as  the 
inevitable  rebuilding  of  the  bi-product 
coke  ovens,  the  extra  depreciation  caused 
to  rolling  mills  through  the  class  of  ma- 
terial now  being  rolled,  part  of  the  ab- 
normal cost  of  new  construction,  as  well 
as  furtlier  provision  for  Magpie  Mine, 
general  depreciation,  etc." 

— ® 

CANADIAN  CONCERN  SHARES  IN 
AEROPLANE  ORDER 

AN  agreement  has  been  reached  between 
the  British  and  American  Governments 
by  which  half  the  capacity  of  the  Curtiss 
plants  will  be  devoted  to  aeroplane  re- 
quirements of  our  European  Allies.  This 
agreement  applies  no  matter  how  great 
capacity  the  Curtiss  Company  finally 
attains. 

The  Curtiss  Company  will  complete 
an  order  within  the  next  two  weeks  for 
200  biplanes  for  Great  Britair,,  work  on 
which  was  started  last  year.  These  bi- 
planes are  of  the  training  variety  and 
the  cost  to  Great  Britain  is  $30,000  each. 
In  other  words,  the  order  amounted  to 
$5  000,000. 

The  Willys-Overland  Automobile  Co., 
which  now  controls  the  Curtiss  concern. 


has  received  some  large  orders  for  aero- 
plane parts.  These  include  bolts,  nuts, 
turnbuckles,  etc.  These  orders  for  the 
Willys  Company  will  be  manufactured  at 
the  Willys  Morrow  plant  in  Elmira.  The 
orders  aggregate  probably  close  to  $25,- 
000,000,  and  must  be  completed  within  28 
weeks.  These  large  orders  are  over  and 
above  an  order  for  1,000  of  the  Sunbeam 
motors,  now  being  manufactured  by  the 
Canadian  subsidiary  of  the  Willy-Over- 
land Company. 

© 

NEW   PROCESS   OF   SULPHUR   PRO- 
DUCTION 

THE  drain  on  the  world's  sulphur  supply 
for  the  manufacture  of  munitions  and 
fertilizers  has  prompted  the  United 
States  Government  Bureau  of  Mines  to 
make  an  investigation  of  various  process- 
es for  recovering  sulphur  from  the  sul- 
phur dioxide  in  smelter  gases.  A  report 
just  issued  by  the  bureau  states  that  sul- 
phur has  been  produced  in  extensive  ex- 
periments with  a  new  process,  and  that 
it  can  be  produced  on  a  commercial  basis 
for  $12  to  $13  a  ton.  Crude  sulphur  is 
now  selling  in  this  country  for  $55  a  ton, 
and  refined  sulphur  for  about  $80. 

An  increase  in  the  sulphur  supply  of 
the  world  would  tend  to  lower  the  cost 
of  munitions,  fertilizer,  commercial  sul- 
phuric acid,  and  newsprint  paper,  in  the 
manufacture  of  which  sulphur  is  an  im- 
portant agent. 


ALLIES  BUY  HEAVILY  IN   U.  S. 

WHETHER  or  not  the  Allies  who  are 
now  purchasing  various  supplies  in  the 
United  States  in  enormous  quantities 
will  be  gratified  if  the  Government  fixes 
the  prices  at  which  American  commodi- 
ties are  to  be  sold,  is  a  question  yet  to  be 
determined. 

For  one  of  the  reasons  why  high  prices 
for  commodities  of  all  kinds  have  been 
established  and  a  tendency  to  an  increase 
in  prices  has  been  noticed  is  to  be  found 
in  the  imperative  pressure  which  the  re- 
presentatives of  the  Allies  who  are  now 
in  the  United  States  have  brought  to  bear 
upon  manufacturers  and  others  so  that 
they  can  secure  their  supplies  and  get 
them  as  rapidly  as  possible. 

Upon  excellent  authority  it  can  be 
stated  that  there  are  now  in  the  United 
States  several  thousand  representatives 
of  Great  Britain  and  France  as  well  as 
representatives  of  other  Allied  nations 
seeking  to  secure  commodities,  although 
some  of  them  are  occupied  with  inspec- 
tion of  commodities  already  purchased. 
There  is,  therefore,  intense  competition 
in  American  markets  between  represent- 
atives of  other  nations  who  are  here  for 
the  purpose  of  buying  American  pro- 
ducts. 

On  excellent  authority  it  is  reported 
that  representatives  of  Great  Britain 
who  are  now  in  the  United  States  are 
purchasing  commodities  the  aggregate 
money  value  of  which  each  week  is  from 
$18,000,000  to  $20,060,000.  The  money 
by  mean  of  which.,  payment  for  these 
commodities  will  "be  made  will  be  obtain- 
ed by  loans  made  by  the  Government  of 
the  United  States. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


For  Sale — A  Modern  Steel  Building 

300  ft.  X  120  ft.  wide  with   3  10-ton  47-ft.  span 

Electric  Travelling  Cranes  for  3/60/550  volt  service,  or  cranes  will  be  sold  separately 

THIS  BUILDING  WAS  NEW  IN  1913 


Contains  the  following  Machine  Tools — Practically  new 


1—8  Spindle  Bertram  Arch  Bar  Drill. 
1—26—48"  X  20'  McCabe  Double  Spindle  Lathe. 
2 — No.  3  Bertram  Double  Axle  Lathes. 
1 — 42"  Bertram  Car  Wheel  Borer  with  Hub  facing  at- 
tachment and  Crane. 

1—1"  Acme  Triple  Head  Bolt  Cutter. 
1 — 1^2"  Acme  6  Spindle  Nut  Tapper. 
2 — Bertram  Punches  30"  throat  capacity  %"  in  %". 
1 — Bertram  Punch  24"  throat  capacity  1"  in  1". 
1 — Bertram  Punch  18"  throat  capacity  IW  in  1". 
1— C.  M.  C.  Double  End  Punch  and  Shear,  18"  throat, 
capacity  1"  in  1"  and  shear  4"  x  1". 


2 — C.  M.  C.  Punches  18"  throat  capacity  1"  in  1". 
1  each  1",  1%"  and  3"  Ajax  Bolt  Headers. 

1— No.  2  Williams  &  White  Eye  Bender. 

1 — 3,000  lb.  Morgan  Double  Frame  Steam  Hammer. 

2— No.  23,  1  No.  26  and  1  No.  9  Williams  &  White  Bull- 
dozers. 

40 — Canadian  Westinghouse  Motors,  from  3  to  75  H.P. 
for  3/60/550  V.  Service. 

ALSO  LARGE  QUANTITY  OF 
WOODWORKING  iMACHINES 


For  full  particulars^  prices^  write 

THE 

A.  R.  WILLIAMS  MACHINERY  CO.,  LTD. 

64  FRONT  ST.,  West  TORONTO,  ONT* 


LANDIS 


DIAMONDS 

I 

ALL  SIZES,  FINEST  QUALITY, 
AWAITING  YOUR  COMMAND, 

STONES   "THAT  SUIT" 

either   unmounted  or  mounted.      Our  improved 
(any  style)  CAST   STEEL  MOUNTING. 

GUARANTEED    TO   BRING   RESULTS. 


NORTON 


"MADE     IN    CANADA" 


WHEEli^]RiJEING'^01x  fo. 


88  WEST  PiTT  STREET 


WINDSOR,  ONTARIO 


//   any   advertisement    interests   you,   tear   it    out   now   and   place   with    letters  to  be  answered. 


Volume  XVIII. 


INDUSTRIAL  \  CONSTRUCTION  NEWS 

Establishment  or  Enlargement  of    Factories,  Mills,  Power  Plants,  Etc.;  Construc- 
tion   of    Railways,     Bridges,     Etc. ;      Municipal    Undertakings ;     Mining     News 


ENGINEERING 

Thre  Rivers,  Que.— The  Three  Rivers 
Shipyard  Co.  are  buying  equipment  for 
their  new  plant  here. 

Hamilton,  Ont. — The  Acme  Stamping 
&  Tool  Co.  are  building  an  addition  to 
their  factory  on  Sidney  Street. 

Niagara  Falls,  Ont. — Work  is  pro- 
gTessing  satisfactorily  on  the  new  fac- 
tory for  the  Herbert  Morris  Crane  & 
Hoist  Co.  of  Toronto. 

Toronto,  Ont. — The  directors  of  the 
Canadian  National  Exhibition  may  de- 
cide to  build  an  auxiliary  electrical 
power  plant  of  their  own  in  the  near 
future. 

Kingston,  Ont. — It  is  reported  here 
that  the  making  of  shells  at  the  Can- 
adian Locomotive  Works  wiW  be  con- 
tinued for  the  next  six  months,  or  until 
the  present  order  is  completed. 

Copper  Cliff,  Ont.— The  Canadian  Cop- 
per CoiTJoration  will  increase  its  capital 
stock  to  $10,000,000.  The  new  capital 
will  be  used  to  develop  the  property,  and 
will  include  the  erection  of  a  3,000-ton 
mill.    ■ 

Sarnia,  Ont. — It  is  reported  that  a  new 
concern  to  manufacture  automobile  parts 
in  Sarnia  will  start  building  operations 
in  a  few  days  on  a  site  in  the  North 
Ward.  The  main  promoter  of  the  plant 
is   Senator  Lyman  Holmes  of  Michigan. 

Regina,  Sask. — The  Canadian  Nu-Fuel 
Co.  has  been  recently  formed  here  to 
manufacture  a  high-grade  fuel  out  of 
garbage  and  waste  rags,  etc.  The  pro- 
cess of  manufacture  is  the  secret  of 
Edgar  L.  Culver,  of  Chicago,  who  has 
been  manufacturing  fuel  at  Austin  and 
San  Antonio,  Texas. 

Nelson,  B.C. — A  new  light  and  power 
corporation  has  been  organized  known 
as  the  Northport  Power  and  Light  Co., 
to  supply  light  and  power  to  this  dis- 
trict. Its  principal  place  of  business  will 
be  Northport,  and  branch  offices  will  be 
maintained  both  in  the  United  States  and 
Canada.  One  of  the  directors  is  Lome 
A.  Campbell,  of  the  West  Kootenay  Light 
and  Power  Co. 

St.  John's,  Nfld.— R.  H.  Reid,  vice- 
president  of  the  Labrador  Pulp  and  Pa- 
per Co.,  is  credited  with  saying  that 
the  undertaking  would  mean  the  develop- 
ment of  one  of  the  most  important  water 
powers  in  the  country,  the  falls  on  the 
Hamilton  River  are  second  to  those  of 
Nagara.  The  bonds  of  the  company  will 
not  be  placed  on  the  market,  and  the  in- 
creased capitalization  will  all  be  mot  by 
private  subscription. 

Flesherton,  Ont. — The  oil  prospects 
here  are  improving  and  continue  to  at- 
tract oil  men.  A  company  from  Midland 
delivered  four  carloads  of  machinery  last 
week,  and  will  commence  drilling  in  a 
few  days  on  Reeve  McTavish's  farm  ad- 


joining the  town.  On  the  Lever  farm 
drilling  is  down  over  one  thousand  feet, 
going  through  Hudson  shale  with  oil 
signs  increasing.  In  the  Karstedt  well 
experts  from  Detroit  are  pleased  with 
the  prospects. 

Rigaud,  Que. — It  is  reported  that  the 
Curtis  &  Harvey  trinitrotoluol  plant  at 
Dragon,  destroyed  by  an  explosion  on 
August  18,  will  not  be  rebuilt  on  the 
same  scale  as  before.  Negotiations  are 
still  under  way  with  the  American  Gov- 
ernment regarding  contracts  which 
would  have  kept  the  plant  destroyed 
busy  for  months  to  come.  These  con- 
tracts cannot  be  carried  out  under  pre- 
sent conditions,  and  it  has  not  yet  been 
agreed  whether  they  shall  be  carried  out 
in  part. 


ELECTRICAL 

Picton,  Ont. — The  Town  Council  con- 
templates installing  hydro-electric  sys- 
tem.    A  by-law  will  be  voted  on. 

Thorold,  Ont.— The  Town  Council  are 
considering  the  advisability  of  installing 
hydro-electric  system  here. 

Picton,  Ont. — The  Hydro  by-laws  voted 
on  last  Friday  by  the  municipalities  of 
Picton,  Wellington  and  Bloomfield  were 
carried  by  a  large  majority. 

Thessalon,  Ont.— The  Hydro-Electric 
Power  Commission  of  Ontario  are  inves- 
tigating the  possibilities  of  power  de- 
velopment in  the  vicinity  of  Thessalon, 
Ont. 

St.  Thomas,  Ont.— The  Hydro-Electric 
Commission  and  the  Council  have  reach- 
ed a  tentative  arrangement  for  the  im- 
provement "of  the  lighting  system  on 
Ross  Street,  St.  Catherine  Street  and 
Wilson  Avenue.  The  cost  of  the  change 
from  the  old  plan  will  reach  some  thous- 
ands of  dollars,  and  will  be  borne  by  the 
commission. 

Toronto,  Ont. — The  Ontario  Hydro- 
Electric  Commission  is  about  to  demand 
for  use  of  municipalities  and  industrial 
establishments  on  this  side  of  the  inter- 
national boundary.  80,000  horse-power  of 
electric  energy  which  private  companies 
at  Niagara  Falls  have  been  exporting  to 
the  United  States.  The  Ontario  Govern- 
ment has  passed  an  Order-in-Council 
authorizing  the  commission  to  expro- 
priate the  power  now  exported. 

Sarnia,  Ont. — The  motor  generator 
purchased  by  the  Sarnia  Street  Railway 
Co.,  to  generate  the  power  for  the  line 
has  arrived  in  the  city,  and  is  being  in- 
stalled at  the  hydro-electric  plant  in  the 
North  End.  The  outside  construction  in 
connection  with  the  installation  of  hydro 
in  this  city  is  about  completed.  The 
work  on  the  line,  which  will  serve  the 
South  End  manufacturing  concerns,  the 
Imperial  Oil  Co.,  the  Mueller  Mfg.  Co., 
the  Perfection  Co.,  and  other  industries, 
will  be  commenced  shortly. 


GENERAL 

Elmira,  Ont.— The  Great  West  Felt 
Co.  will  build  a  factory  here  to  cost 
$5,000. 

Fort  William,  Ont.— The  N.  M.  Patter- 
son Co.  are  building  a  reinforced  con- 
crete elevator  to  cost  $200,000.  The 
Fegles  Bellows  Co.  have  the  contract. 

Montreal,  Que. — Twenty  thousand  dol- 
lars damage  was  done  last  Friday  by  fire 
and  water  to  the  plant  of  Holmes,  Hogue 
&  Co.,  box  manufacturers,  235  Chatham 
Street. 

Mcosomin,  Sask. — The  Saskatchewan 
Co-operative  Elevator  Co.  have  pur- 
chased from  J.  Sharpe,  Moosomin,  his 
large  elevator.  The  elevator  is  being 
remodelled,  relined,  and  made  ready  for 
business  October  1. 


MUNICIPAL 

Rosthern,  Sask. — The  town  will  instal 
a  50-k.w.  gas  engine  and  generator,  and 
switchboard,  etc. 

Mitchell,  Ont. — The  electric  light  plant 
at  Brussels  has  been  purchased  by  S. 
Wilton  for  $3,500. 

Port  Dover,  Ont. — The  waterworks 
by-law,  voted  on  here  was  carried  by  a 
large  majority.  The  figures  were:  For, 
151;  -against  74. 

Owen  Sound,  Ont. — At  the  regular 
meeting  the  Town  Council  unanimously 
endorsed  the  new  steel  industry  by-law 
after  several  amendments  had  been  pro- 
posed. It  was  also  decided  to  hold  the 
election  on  the  by-law  on  Sept.  15. 

Tilbury,  Ont. — The  ratepayers  voted 
almost  unanimously  on  Aug.  27.  to  en- 
dorse the  by-law  agreement  with  the 
Hesseo  Electric  Co.,  the  vote  standing 
209  for  and  8  against.  The  town  will 
furnish  a  free  site  of  five  acres  to  the 
company,  will  exempt  them  from  all  tax- 
es except  school  and  local  improvements 
fur  ten  years,  and  v/ill,  furnish  free 
v.-ater  for  ten  years,  :md  will  guarantee 
the  company's  borAs  fnr  $35,00!)  fur  13 
vi'ars. 


TENDERS 

Cobalt,  Ont. — Tenders  will  be  received 
until  September  18  for  installing  a  com- 
plete telephone  system.  R.  L.  O'Gorman, 
town  clerk. 

Cobalt,  Ont. — Tenders  will  be  received 
up  to  Sept.  18,  for  the  supply  of  mater- 
ial and  labor  necessary  in  the  installa- 
tion of  a  complete  telephone  system  in 
the  Town  of  Cobalt,  and  in  part  of  the 
adjoining  Township  of  Coleman.  Further 
particulars  will  be  furnished  by  R.  L. 
O'Gorman,  Town  Clerk. 

Toronto,  Ont. — Tenders  will  be  re- 
ceived, addressed  to  the  Chairman,  Board 
of  Control,  City  Hall,  Toronto,  up  to 
Tuesday,  October  2nd,  1917,  for  the  con- 
struction and  delivery  of  stop  valves, 
valve  operating  pump  and  special  cast- 


September  6,  1917.  ■  CANADIAN     MACHINERY 


GEOMETRIC 


"Around  the  Geometric  Die  Head  we  draw  a  circle  and  claim  that  no 
other  can  touch  it  for  quality  and  quantity  production." 

That  is  the  claim  of  the  Manufacturer. 
This  is  the  claim  of  the  User: 


"We  purchased  four  sets  9  16  -18  chasers  from  you  four  months 
ago,  and  are  pleased  to  state  that  the  first  set  is  still  in  use  and 
doing  perfect  work,  although  it  has  been  used  almost  daily  since 
purchased,  and  threading  better  than  a  thousand  pieces  per  day." 


From  1,000  to  4,000  threaded  pieces,  according  to  work  conditions,  is  the  repu- 
tation of  Geometric  Die  Heads.  Unless  you  know  what  GEOMETRIC 
experience  is,  you  have  yet  to  learn  what  can  be  accomplished  in  the  production 
of  screw  threads. 

ff^e  are  ready  to  help  yon.  Ask  us  about  it. 

THE   GEOMETRIC  TOOL   COMPANY 

xNEW  HAVEN,  CONN.,  U.S.A. 

Canadian  Agents: 
\Villiams&  Wilson,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  The  A.  R.  Will:amsMachinery  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  Wmnipej;!;,  and  St.  John,  N.B. 


//    any    advertisement   interests    you,    tear   it    out   now   and   place    with    tetters  to  h~  answered. 


76 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


ings,  for  main  pumping  station.  Speci- 
fications and  forms  of  tender  may  be  ob- 
tained at  the  Worksi  Department,  Room 
12,  City  Hall. 

London,  Ont.— Tenders  will  be  received 
by  the  City  Clerk  until  September  7th, 
1917,  for  the  following:— (a)  One  sludge 
pump,  100  gallons  per  minute  capacity, 
head  30  feet,  with  valves  and  connec- 
tions; (b)  one  single  phase  motor  to  op- 
erate pump.  For  specification  and  fur- 
ther information  address  the  engineers, 
Chipman  &  Power,  Mail  Building,  To- 
ronto. 

Ottawa,  Ont.— Tenders  will  be  receiv- 
ed by  the  undersigned  until  Sept.  10, 
1917,  for  ribbed  corrugated  or  dovetailed 
plate  and  expanded  metal  concrete  re- 
inforcing steel.  All  tenders  to  be  based 
on  one  hundred  thousand  (100,000) 
square  feet  (more  or  less)  of  24"  gauge 
expanded  metal  with  combined  reinforc- 
ing and  centering  properties:  and  fifty- 
seven  thousand  (57,000)  square  feet 
(more  or  less)  of  24  in.  gauge  ribbed 
expanded  metal  as  above,  or  24  in.  gauge 
ribbed,  corrugated  or  dovetailed  steel 
plate,  delivered  on  the  site,  to  be  in  con- 
formity with  the  samples  submitted,  and 
to  comply  in  physical  properties  and  tests 
with  the  specifications  of  the  American 
Society  for  Testing  Materials.  Deliver- 
ies to  commence  on  or  before  Oct.  1,  1917, 
and  to  continue  as  directed  in  such  quan- 
tities as  to  ensure  complete  delivery  by 
Dec.  31,  1917.  John  A.  Pearson  and  J.  O 
Marchand,  Architects,  Central  Block, 
Parliament  Buildings,  Ottawa. 

TRADE^OSSIP 

The  Canadian  Cartridge  Co.,  of  Hamil- 
ton, Ont.,  has  increased  its  capital  stock 
from  1750,000  to  $1,000,000. 

L'Air  Liquide  Society  Toronto  has  pre- 
sented to  the  Toronto  Technical  School 
a  complete  oxy-actelyene  welding  outfit. 

Montreal  Customs  Receipts. — Mont- 
real August  Customs  receipts  were 
3,320,000  for  August,  an  increase  of 
$504,319  over  the  corresponding  month 
of  last  year.  Inland  revenue  receipts 
were  $1,361,260,  an  increase  of  $190,000. 

Sault  Ste.  Marie,  Ont.— The  blast  fur- 
nace which  the  Algoma  Steel  Co.  have 
removed  from  Midland,  will  when  erect- 
ed have  an  approximate  capacity  of  400 
tons  of  pig  iron  per  day.  The  company 
have  recently  installed  a  75-ton  open- 
hearth  furnace,  which  will  bring  the 
steel  making  capacity  of  the  plant  up  to 
50,000  tons  of  billets  per  month. 

Motor  Car  Merger  Announced. — It  is 
announced  that  the  plan  of  consolidation 
of  the  Maxwell  Motor  Car  Co.  and  the 
Chalmers  Motor  Corporation  provided 
for  a  lease  of  the  Chalmers  plant,  equip- 
ment and  facilities  for  five  years  on  a 
basis  of  50  per  cent,  of  the  net  profits, 
the  Maxwell  Co.  guaranteeing  upkeep 
and  preservation  of  good-will,  while  the 
Chalmers  Co.  provides  $3,000,000  of  new 
capital. 

Staff  Changes  in  G.  T.  Motive  Power 
Dept. — Roy  Battley,  formerly  of  Strat- 
ford, becomes  master  mechanic  of  the 
eastern  lines.  George  Wilson  becomes 
master  mechanic  in  the  Montreal  shops, 
instead  of  Mr.  Maver.     Alex.  McDonald, 


assistant  master  mechanic  at  Stratford 
becomes  ssistant  master  mechanic  in  the 
Montreal  shops.  W.  C.  Seeley  is  made 
foreman  of  the  erecting  shops  at  Strat- 
ford. 

Where  Sulphuric  Comes  From.— The 
Bureau  of  Mines  at  Washington  has 
compiled  some  interesting  statistics  re- 
garding the  sulphuric  acid  situation.  Of 
the  6,250,000  tons  of  50  per  cent,  acid 
used  last  year,  2,500,000  tons,  or  40  per 
cent.,  came  from  Spanish  pyrites;  350,- 
000  tons,  of  5.6  per  cent.,  came  from  Can- 
adian pyi-ites;  800,000  tons,  or  12.8  per 
cent.,  came  from  smelter  acid,  and  1,200,- 
000  tons,  or  19.2  per  cent.,  came  from 
sulphur. 

Big  Destroyer  Fleet  for  U.S.— Secre- 
tary of  the  Navy  Daniels  expects  to  sub- 
mit to  Congress  shortly  estimates  of 
$350,000,000  for  a  great  fleet  of  destroy- 
ers. The  money  will  be  used  to  expand 
existing  shipbuilding  plants  and  also  to 
build  additional  engine  and  boiler  factor- 
ies, as  the  destroyer  programme  upon 
which  shipbuilding  industry  is  now  en- 
gaged, represents  the  full  capacity  of  the 
industry. 

Marine  Insurance  Risks  Easier. — 
Marine  war  risk  insurance  in  New  York 
has  a  lower  tendency.  Rates  to  South 
America  have  been  reduced  from  1%  to 
1  per  cent,  for  River  Plate  and  Buenos 
.\yi-es,  and  from  1  per  cent,  to  %  per 
cent,  for  Brazil.  United  Kingdom  rates 
in  many  cases  are  easier  than  a  week 
ago.  The  minimum  on  eastbound  armed 
passenger  ships  is  6  per  cent.  Rates  to 
France  are  also  down  to  6  per  cent. 

First  Standard  Ship  Commissioned. — 
The  first  of  the  British  Government's 
standardized  merchant  steamers  to^  re- 
place tonnage  lost  through  submarines, 
has  been  commissioned  after  completing 
most  successful  trials.  The  keel  was 
laid  down  in  February  and  the  hull  was 
launched  in  June.  It  is  understood  that 
six  diflTerent  types  of  vessels,  varying  in 
size  from  8,000  tons  downward  are  be- 
ing built.  Many  hundreds  of  such  ships 
will  be  constructed. 

The  Canadian  Fairbanks-Morse  Co. 
are  showing  at  the  old  stand  this  year  at 
the  Canadian  National  Exhibition.  To- 
ronto. A  new  feature  this  year  is  a 
demonstration  of  "Chase"  farm  tractors. 
A  50-barrel  "Midget"  mill  is  in  operation 
and  also  several  gas  and  oil  engines  of 
various  sizes.  The  company  are  also 
showing  a  "Redden"  truck  attachment 
for  Ford  cars.  The  representatives  in- 
clude G.  B.  Wheeler,  G.  Robson.  R.  M. 
Wenger  and  R.  Rogers. 

August  Increase  in  Customs  Revenue. 
— A  report  from  Ottawa  states  that  com- 
plete returns  for  August  are  not  yet 
available,  but  the  increase  over  the  cor- 
responding month  of  last  year  will  be  con- 
siderably over  $3,000,000.  For  the  first 
five  months  of  the  present  fiscal  year  the 
increase  will  be  over  $17,000,000  over  the 
same  period  of  last  year.  At  this  rate, 
the  customs  revenue  should  show  a  $40,- 
000,000  increase  over  the  returns  for  the 
previous  fiscal  year. 

Aluminum  Pistons  for  Gas  Engines. — 
On  the  subject  of  aluminum  pistons  for 
internal  combustion  engines,  Joseph  Leo- 


Volume  XVIU. 

pold,  an  American  engineer  with  much 
experience  of  this  class  of  work,  advo- 
cates a  plain-sided  piston  of  normal 
length,  with  circumferential  grooves  in 
the  skirt,  as  distinct  from  the  hour-glass 
or  narrow-waisted  type.  It  has  only  two 
rings  above  the  gudgeon  pin,  the  lower 
one  having  its  groove  bevelled  and  the 
bevel  drilled  through  to  the  interior.  A 
third  ring  is  provided  at  the  bottom  end 
of  the  skirt. 

Contracts  to  Build  40  Steel  Freighters. 
— W.  Averill  Harriman,  through  the  Mer- 
chants Shipbuilding  Coroporation,  of 
New  York,  which  he  organized  and  con- 
trols, has  signed  contracts  for  construc- 
tion of  the  largest  amount  of  steel  ship- 
ping tonnage  so  far  ordered  by  the  Em- 
ergency Fleet  Corporation  from  any 
single  concern.  The  Merchant  Ship- 
building Corporation  operates  Harri- 
man's  new  shipyard  at  Bristol,  Penn., 
and  this  yard  [s  to  construct  for  th 
Government  forly  9,000  ton  fabricated 
steel  freight  steamers. 

Ore  Carriers  in  Demand. — According 
to  reports  from  the  Northwest,  it  will  be 
Sept.  15  or  20  when  the  movement  of  the 
new  crop  gets  started,  and  it  will  prob- 
ably be  a  week  or  ten  days  later  before 
the  demand  for  tonnage  is  very  active. 
Small  carriers  and  line  boats  will  be 
able  to  take  care  of  the  movement  dur- 
ing the  first  ten  days.  The  market  at 
Cleveland,  O.,  in  other  lines  is  without 
change.  Ore  carriers  are  in  good  de- 
mand and  some  business  is  being  done, 
but  the  supply  of  coal  tonnage  is  in  ex- 
cess of  the  demand  and  chartering  is 
light. 

Big  Demand  for  Rails. — A  despatch 
from  New  York  states  that  users  of  light 
rails  are  continuing  to  call  for  much 
tonnage,  but  the  mills  are  unable  to 
meet  their  demands  and  many  of  them 
are  being  disappointed.  It  is  expected 
that  considerable  difficulty  will  be  met 
with  in  filling  the  Government's  inquiry 
for  25,000  to  30,000  tons  of  light  rails  for 
France,  which  has  been  in  the  market  for 
several  weeks.  It  is  probable  that  to 
supply  this  tonnage  some  buyers  now  on 
the  books  may  be  displaced.  A  25,000 
to  30,000  ton  lot  for  the  French  Govern- 
ment direct  also  remains  up  for  consider- 
ation. 

Sulphur  Shipments  Require  License. — 
The  Trade  and  Commerce  Department, 
Ottawa,  has  been  notified  from  Washing- 
ton that  the  Burea  of  Export  Licenses 
has  authorized  the  United  States  cus- 
toms collector  to  pass  sulphur  shipments 
to  Canada  which  were  already  en  route 
on  or  before  Aug.  27,  and  prior  to  the 
coming  into  effect  of  the  new  American 
export  regulations.  After  Aug.  27,  how- 
ever, all  sulphur  shipments  to  Canada 
will  require  special  licenses.  Applica-. 
tions  for  such  licenses  must  go  to  the 
Deputy  Minister  of  Trade  and  Commerce 
at  Ottawa,  who  will  pass  upon  them,  and, 
if  they  are  satisfactory,  he  will  send 
them  on  to  Washington. 

Electrical  Experts  Conclude  Confer- 
ence.— The  Ontario  Municipal  Electrical 
Association  concluded  a  two-days'  ses- 
sion in  conference  at  the  Chemistry  and 
Mining  Building  of  the  University  of  To- 
ronto, on  Aug.  29.     Delegates  from  alf 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


77 


A.K. 


MOTOR 


AND 


CONTROLLER 


The  A.K.  Motors 
are  built  for  high 
ef  f  iciencyand  long 
durability. 

Single  Phase,  Variable 
Speed  Type  will  run  on 
110  or  220  volts,  25  or  60 
cycle. 

These  come  in  sizes  from 
1/4  to  11/2  H.P.  and  are 
stocked,  complete  with  a 
12-speed  Con t rol  1  er,  in 
Toronto. 

Aikenhead  Hardware  Limited,  17, 19, 21,  Temperance  St.,  Toronto,  Can. 


/^^^4>  New  Chuck 

Don't  Throw  Away   Broken  Tang   Drills 

See  the  Pei'haps  you  are  about  to  discard  some  taper  shank  drills  be- 
cause the  tangs  are  broken  off— DON'T  DO  IT— they  are  worth 
their  weight  in  gold.    You  can  use  them  just  as  they  are  with  a 

Wahlstrom  Automatic  Chuck 

One  chuck  holds  drills  from  1/16"  to  1  Vi " 

and  you  won't  bare  to  take  time  from  your  production  to  repair 
them. 

Tool  changes  are  made  in  two  seconds — just  grasp  the  shell  of 
tbe  chuck  witb  one  hand  and  pvit  in  or  remove  the  tool  with  the 
other — no  collets — no  lost  time,  for  the  spindle  never  stops.  The 
jaws  grip  NOT  BY  THE  TANG,  BUT  ON  THE  SIDE  OF 
THE  TAPER — there's  no  chance  for  slippage — a  Wahlstrom 
won't  even  mar  the  shanks. 

AIKENHEAD  HARDWARE  LIMITED 


17,   19,  21   Temperance  Street 


Toronto,  Canada 


//    atiy    advertisement    interests   you,    tear   it    out    now   and   place   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


78 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


parts  of  the  province  were  present  for  a 
discussion  of  matters  connected  with 
Hydro  engineering  plans.  W.  P.  Dobson, 
Chief  Engineer  of  the  Labatory  Depart- 
ment of  the  Hydro-Electric  Commission 
read  an  interesting  paper  on  "Demand 
Meters."  A  motion  picture  demonstra- 
tion was  also  given  by  E.  H.  Porte,  show- 
ing the  systems  in  Ontario  supplied  with 
power  by  the  Hydro-Electric  Commission 
throughout  the  province. 

Hydro  May  Expropriate  Power. — 
Within  a  month  or  so  the  Ontario  Hydro- 
Electric  Commission  will  take  steps  to 
expropriate  the  power  which  is  being  ex- 
ported by  the  Canadian  Niagara  Co.  and 
the  Electrical  Development  Co.,  if  the  de- 
veloping companies  refuse  to  supply  the 
Hydro  Commission  with  the  amount  of 
power  they  require.  By  this  means  83,- 
000  h.p.  will  be  available  to  make  up  the 
shortage  of  power  in  the  province.  The 
Electrical  Development  Co.  is  exporting 
50,000  of  its  horsepower,  and  the  Can- 
adian Niagara  Co.  is  exporting  30,000 
horsepower.  The  old  Ontario  Power  Co., 
which  the  Hydro  Commission  purchased 
and  took  over  a  month  ago,  was  export- 
ing something  like  40,000  horsepower. 
Now  there  is  said  to  be  83,000  horsepow- 
er wanted  by  the  Hydro  Commission  to 
make  up  the  shortage  of  power,  and  this 
will  have  to  be  supplied  by  the  two  first 
companies. 

New  U.  S.  Shipyards. — Contracts  for 
construction  of  three  U.  S.  Government 
owned  shipyards  for  building  fabricated 
steel  merchant  vessels  have  been  award- 
ed at  Washington  by  the  Shipping 
Board's  Emergency  Fleet  Corporation. 
They  went  to  the  Submarine  Boat  Cor- 
poi-ation  for  a  plant  at  Newark,  N.J.; 
the  American  International  Corporation, 
for  one  at  Hog  Island,  Pa.,  and  the  Mer- 
chants Shipbuilding  Company,  for  one  at 
Chester,  Pa.  The  yards  wi'll  cost  $3.5,- 
000,000,  and  the  builders  of  the  yards  are 
given  contracts  for  building  in  them  two 
hundred  ships.  The  prospects  are  that 
conti-acts  for  many  more  vessels  will  be 
let  when  these  are  completeed.  The  Sub- 
marine Corporation  will  lay  ways  for 
building  twenty-eight  ships  simultane- 
ously and  will  have  facilities  and  equip- 
ment to  turn  out  one  5,000-ton  ship  every 
two  days  after  the  first  vessel  is  com- 
pleted. 

Algoma  Steel  Co.'s  Output. — The  out- 
put of  the  Algoma  Steel  Corporation. 
Sault  Ste.  Marie,  Ont.,  for  the  year  end- 
ing June  30,  was  348,519  tons  of  pig  iron 
and  280,296  tons  of  finished  steel.  The 
output  consisted  of  shell  steel,  together 
with  rails  and  merchant  bars.  Opera- 
tions have  been  largely  governed  by  the 
requirements  of  the  Imperial  Munitions 
Board,  which  has  regulated  the  distribu- 
tion of  the  company's  product.  Through- 
out the  twelve  months  somewhat  diffi- 
cult conditions  have  prevailed,  especially 
as  regards  labor  and  materials,  the  de- 
liveries of  the  latter  having  been  seri- 
ously hampered.  Especially  was  this  the 
case  with  coal,  the  bringing  in  of  which 
on  account  of  car  shortage  necessitated 
continued  and  expensive  importation 
throughout  the  winter  months  after  the 
close  of  lake  navigation.  Conditions  have 
improved    somewhat,   but   materials    are 


generally  and  necessarily  more  difficult 
to  obtain,  whilst  deliveries  are  only  ob- 
tainable far  ahead. 

Canadian  Steel  Corporation  Plans. — 
Plans  for  the  erection  of  the  United 
States  Steel  Corporation's  $20,000,000 
plant  at  Ojibway,  Ont.,  will  now  be  car- 
ried forward,  according  to  a  statement  of 
Ward  B.  Perley,  vice-president  and 
general  manager  of  the  Canadian  Steel 
Corporation,  the  Canadian  subsidiary  of 
the  big  United  States  concern.  This 
company  was  incorporated  some  three 
years  ago.  A  tract  of  land  on  the  St. 
Clair  River,  north  of  Windsor,  was  pur- 
chased, a  separate  municipality  was 
established,  streets  were  laid  out  for  an 
ideal  town,  such  as  the  United  States 
Steel  Corporation  has  at  its  American 
plants.  Then  the  war  put  a  temporary 
stop  to  construction.  The  bid  for  ten- 
ders for  the  construction  of  a  slip  and 
huge  concrete  •and  steel  docks  for  the 
Ojibway  Company  was  the  sign  for  a 
renewal  of  construction  and  further 
plans  of  the  company  will  now  be  pro- 
ceeded with.  The  plant  is  well  situated, 
being  on  the  direct  water  route  from  the 
Lake  Superior  iron  mines  to  the  ocean. 
Hydro-Electric  power  will  be  avai'.able 
from  Niagara.  The  operations  of  the 
plant,  as  outlined  by  Judge  E.  H.  Gary, 
chairman  of  the  Board  of  Directors  of 
the  United  States  Steel  Corporation,  will 
include  some  blast  furnaces  and  mills  for 
the  manufacture  of  wire,  rails  and  bars 
and  perhaps  other  steel  products. 


PERSONAL 

Paul  G.  Chase,  vice-president  of  the 
Port  Arthur  Shipbuilding  Co.,  has  re- 
turned from  a  business  trip  to  New  York. 

W.  H.  Sample  has  been  appointed  su- 
perintendent of  motive  power  of  the 
Grand  Trunk  Railway,  with  headquarters 
at  Montreal,  in  succession  to  W.  D.  Robb. 

Martin  N.  Todd,  president  of  the  G.  P. 
and  H.  Railway  and  general  manager  of 
the  L.  E.  &  N.  Railway,  died  suddenly 
at  his  home  in  Gait,  Ont.,  on  Aug  29, 
aged  58. 

A.  M.  Barry,  who  for  the  past  six  years 
has  been  general  superintendent  of  the 
St.  Lawrence  Welding  Co.,  Montreal,  has 
been  promoted  to  the  position  of  man- 
ager of  the  above  company. 

N.  E.  Gillen.  general  superintendent  of 
the  G.  T.  R.,  at  Chicago,  111.,  has  been  ap- 
pointed vice-president,  with  headquarters 
at  Montreal,  in  charge  of  the  operating 
department.  Mr.  Gillen  entered  the  ser- 
vice of  the  G.  T.  R.  in  1901. 

Wallace  Millichamp,  a  retired  manu- 
facturer of  Toronto,  died  on  Aug.  28,  at 
his  residence,  237  Poplar  Plains  Road, 
after  an  illness  of  several  months.  He 
was  born  in  Birmingham,  England,  in 
1839,  and  came  to  Canada  when  he  was 
14  years  of  age. 

W.  D.  Robb,  superintendent  of  motive 
power  of  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway,  has 
been  appointed  vice-president  in  charge 
of  motive  power,  car  equipment  and  ma- 
chinery, with  headquarters  at  Montreal. 
Mr.  Robb  has  been  in  the  service  of  the 
G.  T.  R.  since  1871,  and  for  the  last  15 
years  has  occupied  the  position  which  he 
has  relinquished. 


Frank  H.  Crockard,  the  new  president 
and  general  manager  of  Nova  Scotia 
Steel  and  Coal  Co.,  is  in  New  York,  after 
having  spent  some  time  in  the  Pittsburg 
district.  He  went  there  after  a  confer- 
ence with  depai-tmental  heads  in  Nova 
Scotia,  and  is  understood  to  have  framed 
up  a  comprehensive  plan  for  the  develop- 
ment of  the  company. 

George  C.  Jones  has  assumed  his  new 
duties  as  assistant  to  the  president 
Grand  Trunk  Railway  System,  with 
headquarters  in  Toronto.  Until  1905  Mr. 
Jones  was  for  many  years  superinten- 
dent of  the  Toronto  terminals  for  the 
G.  T.  R.,  and  left  only  to  go  with  the 
Central  Vermont  Railway  as  vice-presi- 
dent and  general  manager. 

Alexander  Wilson  Crouch,  vice-presi- 
dent and  general  manager  of  the  Dear- 
born Chemical  Co.  of  Canada,  Toronto, 
sailed  last  Saturday  on  the  S.S.  Makura 
from  Vancouver,  on  a  year's  trade  ex- 
pansion trip  to  the  Orient,  Australia, 
Korea  and  India.  Mr.  Crouch  came  to 
Toronto  from  Pittsburgh  six  years  ago. 

George  F.  Steele,  formerly  secretary 
of  the  American  Newsprint  Manufac- 
turers' Association,  has  been  appointed 
general  manager  of  the  Canadian  Export 
Paper  Co.,  Ltd.,  with  headquarters  at 
Montreal.  The  Canadian  Export  Paper 
Co.,  Ltd.,  was  formed  by  a  number  of  the 
leading  newsprint  manufacturers  about 
a  year  ago  to  forward  the  interests  of 
the  industry  in  foreign  markets. 

William  Johnston,  head  of  the  John- 
ston Steamship  Co.,  Liverpool,  England, 
died  recently  at  his  home  in  Woodslee. 
Cheshire.  With  his  brother  Edmund, 
Mr.  Johnston  started  in  the  steamship 
business  nearly  forty  years  ago,  and 
they  eventually  became  owners  of  one  of 
the  largest  steamship  concerns  in  the 
world.  The  company  operated  a  line  of 
steamers  betwen  Baltimore,  Md.,  and 
Liverpool,  and  also  in  the  Black  Sea 
trade  and  ports  in  the  Mediterranean. 

E.  J.  Chamberlin,  who  has  retired  from 
the  position  of  president  of  the  Grand 
Trunk  Railway,  was  appointed  to  that 
position  in  the  spring  of  1912,  on  the 
death  of  the  late  Charles  M.  Hays,  who 
lost  his  life  on  the  Titanic.  Previous  to 
that  time  Mr.  Chamberlin  was  vice-pre- 
sident and  general  manager  of  the  com- 
pany, which  position  he  held  for  two 
years.  In  1896  he  came  to  Canada  as 
general  manager  of  the  Canada  Atlantic 
Railway.  Mr.  Chamberlin  was  born  in 
Lancaster,  New  Hampshire. 

Howard  G.  Kelley,  vice-president  of 
the  Grand  Ti-unk  Railway,  has  been  ap- 
pointed president  and  general  manager, 
in  succession  to  F.  J.  Chamberlin,  who 
has  retired.  Mr.  Kelley  was  born  in 
Philadelphia  in  1858,  and  occupied  im- 
portant positions  at  different  times  on 
several  roads  in  the  United  States.  In 
1907  he  became  chief  engineer  of  the 
Grand  Trunk  Railway  System,  and  was 
appointed  vice-president  of  the  road  in 
1911.  Mr.  Kelley  is  a  member  of  several 
engineering  institutes  and  associations 
in  England,  the  United  States,  and  Can- 
ada, and  has  held  the  office  of  president 
in  two  of  these  societies. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


The  high  standard  of  accuracy  which  is 
gaining  preference  for  "Illinois  Tools" 
in  manufacturing  plants  all  over  the 
country  is  exemplified  in  our  new  Hack 
Saw  Cutters. 

When  you  require  accurate,  durable  cut- 
ters it  is  well  to  remember  "Illinois  Tools" 


tmflilfS  TOOLlWWmS  Chica^aUSA 

Manufacturers  and  Designers  of  Cutters-Hobs-Reamers 


Canadian  Representative :  ALLAN  B.  WEARING,  Canadian  Pacific, R.iR.  Building,  Toronto,  Ontario 


Shell  Forging 

Production 

WITHOUT  AN  EQUAL  FOR 
BOTH  FIRST  AND 
SECOND  OPERATION 
PUNCHES. 

Comes    to    you    heat-treated 

and  ready  for  use. 

It    does    not    stick    to    the 

work. 

There  are  many  cases  where 

each    punch    has    turned    out 

over  2,000  shells. 

It    means    more    shells,    per 

machine  per  day. 

STEEL  OF  EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 

Hawkridge  Brothers 
Company 

303  Congress  St.,  BOSTON,  MASS. 
U.  S.  A. 


THE  IRON  WORKS 


Owen  Sound  iron 
Works 


Engineeis 

Boiler- 
makers 

Founders 

Machinists 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 

MARINE 

Sault  Ste.  Marie,  Ont. — The  red  lights 
on  spar  buoys  4A  and  4B  marking  the 
channel  in  the  vicinity  of  the  wreck  of 
the  steamers  Pentecost,  Mitchell  and 
Saxona  have  been  discontinued.  The  un- 
lighted  buoys  will  be  continued  in  com- 
mission near  Pipe  Island. 

Halifax,  N.S.— The  Quebec  Salvage  & 
Wrecking  Co.'s  steamer  Strathcona, 
which  arrived  here  a  few  days  ago  with 
the  big  steamer  which  had  been  ashore 
on  Bryon  Island  in  the  Magdelens,  has 
left  to  make  an  attempt  to  salvage  the 
lumber  steamer  which  went  on  the  rocks 
in  the  fog  on  Aug.  26. 

Ottawa,  Ont.— The  S.S.  W.  H.  Dwyer, 
owned  by  Forwarders,  Ltd.,  of  Ottawa, 
was  sunk  by  a  mine  or  torpedo  on  Aug. 
26.  This  steamer  was  built  for  the  Up- 
per Lake  grain  trade  in  Sunderland, 
England,  in  1913,  and  went  overseas 
September,  1915,  and  was  since  engaged 
in  carrying  coal  from  England  to 
France.  She  had  a  carrying  capacity  of 
2,500  tons. 

Halifax,  N.S.— Adam  B.  McKay  of 
Hamilton,  Ont.,  will  ibe  present  at  the 
launching  of  the  second  large  schooner 
he  has  had  built  here  this  year  and  will 
make  a  contract  for  the  building  of  a 
third.  The  first  schooner,  the  Letitia  B. 
McKay,  he  has  already  sold  at  a  profit 
over  the  contract  price  of  $70,000.  The 
next  one  to  be  launched  at  Port  Greville 
will  be  named  the  Adam  B.  McKay,  the 
first  one  being  named  after  his  wife. 

Collingwood,  Ont. — The  wooden  steam- 
er Windsor  was  successfully  launched  at 
Robert  Morrill's  shipyard  here  recently. 
The  ship  is  being  built  for  the  Ontario 
Gravel  &  Freighting  Co.,  Windsor,  Ont, 
and  has  the  following  dimensions: 
Length,  105  feet;  breadth,  23  feet,  and 
depth  12  feet,  while  the  motive  power 
is  fore  and  aft  compound  engines,  sup- 
plied with  steam  from  a  Scotch  boiler  12 
feet  by  13  feet,  and  carrying  a  working 
pressure  of  155  pounds  per  sq.  inch. 

Vancouver,  B.C. — J.  J.  Coughlan  & 
Sons  have  received  the  names  of  five 
of  the  six  8,800-ton  steel  boats  they  are 
building  for  the  British  Government. 
Boat  No.  2  is  to  be  known  as  the  "War 
Camp."  No.  3  is  to  go  by  the  name  of 
"War  Charger."  "War  Chariot"  is  the 
name  to  be  applied  to  the  fourth  boat. 
"War  Chief"  is  the  title  assigned  to  the 
fifth  boat,  while  the  sixth  will  go  by  the 
name  of  "War  Noble."  The  first  boat 
has  not  been  named  yet.  Splendid  pro- 
gress is  being  made  at  the  Coughlan 
yards,  and  it  is  expected  that  the  first 
vessel  will  be  launched  in  November. 
The  boats  will  be  the  largest  ever  built 
in  British  Columbia,  being'  100  feet 
longer  than  the  Princess  boats  of  the 
C.  P.  R.,  and  with  ten  feet  more  beam. 

To  Prevent  Seamen  Deserting. — An 
Order-in-Council,  providing  for  the  ap- 
prehension of  seamen  who  desert  from 
any  vessel  owned  or  chartered  by  the 
British  or  Canadian  Government,  or 
carrying  cargo  or  passengers  for  any 
British  or  Allied  Government,  has  been 
passed  by  the  Government.  The  Order 
authorizes  any  owner,  master,  mate, 
naval   or   military  oflicer   or  superinten- 


Volume  XVIII. 

dent  to  convey  such  a  seaman  on  board 
his  ship  or  have  him  detained  in  cus- 
tody until  he  can  be  taken  back  to  the 
vessel.  Police  officers  are  required  to 
render  such  assistance  as  may  be  needed 
to  convey  men,  absent  without  leave,  to 
their  ships.  A  further  section  of  the 
Order  provides  that  seamen  shall  not 
leave  vessels  in  the  classes  mentioned 
without  a  pass  signed  by  the  master, 
mate,  purser  or  first  engineer. 


BUILDING 

Toronto,  Ont. — A  building  permit  has 
been  issued  to  Drummond  McCall  Co.  for 
an  addition  to  warehouse,  373  Front 
Street  East,  to  cost  $10,000. 

Toronto,  Ont. — Work  has  commenced 
on  the  foundations  for  a  new  warehouse 
on  King  Street  for  the  Canadian  Gen- 
eral Electric  Co.  The  building  will  be  of 
mill  construcrton,  six  storeys  high,  with 
a  frontage  of  47  feet  and  185  feet  deep, 

Dundas,  Ont.— Secord  &  Sons,  of 
Brantford,  have  secured  the  contract  for 
the  new  factory  to  be  built  for  Pratt  & 
Whitney.  Work  has  already  been  com- 
menced and  it  is  expected  that  February 
will  see  its  completion.  The  site  is  on 
Hatt  Street.  The  building  will  be  176 
by  75  feet,  three  storeys  and  basement,  of 
fireproof   construction. 


CONTRACTS 

Drummondville,  Que. — The  Southern 
Canada  Power  Co.  have  awarded  a  con- 
tract for  a  400-h.p.  single  vertical  tur- 
bine to  the  S.  Morgan   Smith  Co. 

Dorval,  Que. — The  Norwood  Engineer- 
ing Co.,  Cowansville,  Que.,  have  been 
awarded  the  contract  for  filtration  plant 
to  be  installed  here  at  a  cost  of  $35,300. 

Fort  William,  Ont.— Barnett  &  Mc- 
Queen have  been  awarded  the  general 
contract  for  a  one-storey,  reinforced  con- 
crete construction  elevator  for  Davidson 
Smith   Co.,  to  cost  $100,000. 

Oakville,  Ont. — The  contract  for  build- 
ing the  Tansley  bridge  has  been  given  to 
Norman  McLeod  of  Toronto  at  $60,000. 
The  bridge  will  be  over  600  feet  long,  and 
the  floor  18  feet  wide.  A.  W.  Connor  of 
Toronto  is  the  engineer. 


RAILWAYS— BRIDGES 

Saskatoon,  Sask. — Definite  plans  to- 
ward the  erection  of  a  union  depot  in 
Saskatoon  will  be  made  shortly,  when  H. 
A.  K.  Drury  and  prominent  railway  offi- 
cials come  to  this  city  for  a  conference 
with  civic  authorities. 


INCORPORATIONS 

Montreal  Motors,  Ltd.,  has  been  in- 
corporated at  Toronto  with  a  capital  of 
525,000  to  manufacture  and  deal  in 
motor  cars,  trucks  and  bicycles,  etc.,  at 
Hamilton,  Ont.  The  provincial  direc- 
tors are  J.  M.  McGill,  H.  E.  Phillips  and 
W.  F.  Roney  all  of  Hamilton,  Ont. 

Bennet  Martin  Asbestos  &  Chrome 
Mines,  Ltd.,  has  been  incorporated  at 
Ottawa  by  A.  R.  Martin,  B.  J.  Bennett 
and  F.  Bennett  of  Thetford  Mines,  Que., 
to  carry  on  the  business  cf  mining  and 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


81 


manufacturing  asbestos  at  Thetford 
Mines,  Que.,  with  a  capital  of  $1,500,000. 
The  Collingwood  Steamship  Co.,  has 
been  incorporated  at  Toronto  with  a 
capital  of  $40,000  to  build  and  operate 
steam  and  wooden  ships  of  all  kinds  at 
Collingwood.  Ont.  The  provijicial  dir- 
ectors are  George  C.  Coles,  Fred  G. 
Moles  and  M.  P.  Byrnes  all  of  Colling- 
wood, Ont. 


WOODWORKING 

Goderich,  Ont. — Fire  on  August  29  de- 
stroyed the  Goderich  Mfg.  Co.'s  wood- 
working plant,  owned  by  J.  B.  Baechler. 
The  loss  is  estimated  at  $50,000,  includ- 
ing buildings  and  machinery. 


REFRIGERATION 

St.  John's,  Nfld.— The  Newfoundland 
Cold  Storage  Fish  Corporation  has  com- 
pleted the  installation  of  a  complete  300- 
h.p.  steam-driven  refrigerating  plant 
purchased  from  the  Reinhardt  Brewery, 
Toronto. 


CATALOGUES 

The  Vanadium-Alloys  Steel  Co.,  Pitts- 
burgh, Pa.,  have  distributed  a  stock  list 
of  "Red  Cut  Superior"  and  "Red  Cut  Co- 
balt" high-speed  steels  in  stock  in  their 
Pittsburgh  warehouse,  and  also  at  the 
works  at  Latrobe,  Pa. 

The  Webster  and  Perks  Tool  Co., 
Springfield,  Ohio,  have  for  distribution 
m  the  trade  a  useful  pocket  calculator 
for  use  in  connection  with  grijiding 
operations.  The  calculator  is  a  celluloid 
device  containing  a  sliding  card  with 
tables  on  each  side.  On  one  side  of  the 
calculator  is  a  table  of  circumferences 
and  a  rule  for  obtaining  surface  speeds 
of  abrasive  wheels.  While  on  the  other 
side  is  a  table  of  grinding  wheel  speeds 
with  rule  for  finding  revolutions  at  a 
given  surface  speed. 

The  Bilton  Machine  Tool  Co.,  Bridge- 
port, Conn.,  have  issued  a  set  of  loose 
leaf  bulletins  dealing  with  an  interest- 
ing and  varied  line  of  machine  tools 
which  they  manufacture.  The  product 
includes  principally  automatic  gear  mill- 
ing machines,  gear  bobbing  machines, 
automatic  mUling  machines,  drill 
presses,  and  riveting  machines.  The 
various  types  of  machine  are  illustrated 
and  described  together  with  specifica- 
tions giving  the  principal  dimensiono. 
The  bulletins  are  numbered  20.3  to  221 
inclusive  and  are  gotten  up  in  attractive 
style. 

Engine  Room  Supplies  is  the  title  of 
a  booklet  recently  issued  by  the  Quaker 
City  Rubber  Co.,  Philadelphia,  Pa.  This 
booklet  is  exceptionally  complete  and 
comprehensive,  and  will  serve  as  a  use- 
ful guide  to  the  engineer  in  selecting 
packings,  hose  and  other  necessary  en- 
gine room  requirements.  The  principal 
lines  described  include  Daniels',  P.  P.  P., 
rod  packing.  Ebonite  sheet  packing, 
gaskets  and  steam  hose.  "Crown"  and 
"Quaker  City"  packings.     The  booklet  is 


PATENT 
ATTORNEYS 


RESEARCH    BUREAU 

REPORTS  BY  EXPERTS  ON  SCIENTIFIC.  TECH- 
NICAL AND  INDUSTRIAL  DEVELOPMENT. 
SPECIAL  RESEARCHES  ARRANGED. 

PATENTS,    TRADE    MARKS,    ETC. 


HANBURY  A.  BUDDEN 
i  DRUMMOND  BL.CK5..  MONTREAL 


Cable  Address 
"Brevet" 


■] 

ATENT 

r 

Fetherstonhaueh    &    Co., 

Patent  Solicitor*.  Head  Office, 
Royal    Bank    BMg..    Toronto. 
Ottawa    Office.    5    Elgin    St. 
hend   for  our   Plain    Practical 
Pointers.      Copy    of    National 
Progress,  in  which  our  patents 
are  adTertised,  mailed  free. 

a 

ATENTS 

j^^HsaEiginiiii: 


In  all  countries.     Ask  for  our  Investor's  Adviser. 

which  will  be  sent  free. 
MARION    &   MARION    364    University  St. 

Merchants  Bank  Building,  comer 

St.   Catherine  St..   MONTREAL,    Phone    Up.   6474 

and  Washington,  D.C.,  U.S.A. 


BERTRAMS  LIMITED 

Engineers 
Sciennes,     EDINBURGH 
PAPER    MILL    MACHINERY 

IRON  WORKERS 


MACHINE  TOOLS  for 
Catalogues  offered 


TRY  HAMILTON 

BABBITTS 

We  Make  Nothing  Else 
GEO.  E.  JOBBORN,   Hamilton,  Ont. 


O  YENS        I 

Enamelins     ami     Varnishing     Ovens    heated 
by    Gas,    Electricity.    Steam    or    Coal. 
Write   for    Booklet. 

□     Brantford  Oven  A  Raok  Co.,  Ltd. 

■  Brantford.    Canada. 

■nBn«nMn*nMnBnBnBn«n«n«D«! 


''■,>9o5TABlEPlAiR?J  , 
„      DRAW  CUT  SMAPtRS      _ 
SPKIAl  DRAW  CUT  R  RSHAPtRS^ 
riNI&hCO  MACHINL  KLYS^- 

STAIIflNARyS.  P3RTABLE  KtY  WAYCUTTIRSI 
SPKIAl  LCMMOTIVE  CYIINP6R  PlANtRsI 


OFFICC-"' works:  MUSKEGON  HCICHTi  USA 


ETAL 

STAMPINGS 


r 


M 


We  are  manufactur 
ers  of  stamped  parts 
for   other    manufac 
turers. 

We  do  any  kind  of 
sheet  metal  stamp- 
ing- that  you  require. 
Our  improved  press- 
es and  plating  plant 
enable  us  to  produce 
the  finest  quality  of 
work  in  a  surpris- 
ingly short  time. 
We  can  finish  steel 
stamping  in  Nickel, 
Brass  or  Copper. 

Send  us  a  sample 
order. 


W.  H.BANFIELD&SONS 

372  Rape  Avenue,  Toronto,  Can. 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  N    M  A  C  H  I  N  E  R  Y 


Volume  XVIII 


**PURO  -FY** 


(MADE  IN   CANADA) 


your 

water 

supply 


TKE  Ameriran  Miisfivm  of  Saffty  conferred 
a     Gold     Jledal     Award     upon     Ihe     furo 
Sanitary  Drinking  Fniintain     at 
lnteniatiou.il   Exposition 

The  Puro  Sanitary  Drinliing  Fountain  won  be- 
cause it  deserved  to  win— Puro  had  merits  tiat 
made  it  stand  head  and  shoulders  above  any 
other  drnikiug  apparatus. 

Safe  Simple 

SANITARY  Economical 

Quickly    Attached 

These  are  the  qualities  that  forced  the  leading 
safely  and  sanitary  engineere  to  pick  Puro  in 
preference  to  all  others. 

No  device  can  be  as  efficient  that  does  not  con- 
tain all   these  qualifications;  and   Puro  was  not 
tied  for  first  place;   Puro  was  first. 
Don't    be    satisfied    with    halfway    goodness,    or 
makeshift    drinking    arrangements    for    your    em- 


If  (he  mea  in  : 
them  a  clean  dri 
Puro  is  clean— it 


factory   must  drink,    give 


J  not  rust  or  corrode. 
It  allows  just  the  proper 
amount  of  cool,  clean,  fresh  water  to  come 
through  the  bubbler.  No  spurting,  no  overflow- 
ing, no  loss.  Puro  regulates  itself.  You  can 
attach  it  in   five  minutes. 

TeJl  lis  how  many  men  in  your  factory  and  your 
water  pressure  in  pounds— 

\^e'll     tell     vou     just     what     it     will     cost     to 
"PURO-FT"    TOUR    WATER    SUPPLY. 


PJ!S& 


TR  \Di;  MARK 
147  University   Av 


SANITARY 
DRINKING 
FOUNTAIN 


TORONTO,  ONT, 


"Barnes-made" 

SPRINGS 

are  the  result  of  over 
sixt.v  3'ears'  experituce  iu 
spring  making,  oumbined 
with  unsurpassed  equip- 
ment .Tiid  the  workman- 
ship of  men  who  have 
been  with  us,  ten,  twenty 
and  in  some  cases  thirty 
years. 

Write  for  booklet  No.  7-T. 

Established  1837. 

THE  WALLACE  BARNES  COMPANY 

218  South  St..  Bristol,  Ct..  U.S.A. 
ManTrs  of  "Barnes-made"    Product* 

Spnn4a.ScrewMftchine  Products. Cold  Rolled  St«elendWir« 


pocket   size  and  contains  6.3  pages  with 
index. 

A  Chain  of  Evidence  is  the  title  of 
publication  No.  14,  dealing  with  large 
power  drives  manufactured  by  the 
Morse  Chain  Co.,  Ithaca,  -N.Y.  The 
bulletin  illustrates  and  describes  a  nu..i- 
ber  of  important  Morse  chain  installa- 
tions in  various  plants  showing  the  wide 
field  of  application  for  transmittin.e 
large  powers.  The  bulletin  also  deals 
with  the  construction  of  the  Morse  chain 
and  the  advantages  obtained  by  its  use 
for  laree  power  drives.  Copies  of  this 
publication  may  be  obtained  from  the 
Canadian  agents  Jones  &  Glassco, 
Montreal. 


BOOK  REVIEW. 

Foreign  Commerce  and  Navigation  of 
the  LTnited  States  for  the  year  ending- 
June  30,  1916;  950  pages,  9  x  11%  in., 
cloth  covers.  This  publication,  compiled 
by  the  Bureau  of  Foreign  and  Domestic 
Commerce,  Washington,  contains  statis- 
tics covering  exports  and  imports  of 
merchandise  of  all  kinds.  Copies  may  be 
obtained  from  the  Superintendent  of 
Documents,  Government  Printins;  Office, 
Washins'ton,  D.C.,  price  $1..50  per  copy. 

The  Canadian  Mining  Manual  1916-17. 
by  Reginald  E.  Hore,  Editor  of  the 
Canadian  Mining  Journal,  448  pages  6  in. 
X  8%  in.  Published  by  The  Canadian 
Mining  Journal,  Toronto.  This  is  the 
third  volume  of  the  now  series  of  this 
useful  and  popular  handbook  of  infor- 
mation concerning  the  minerals  and 
mines  of  Canada.  The  publication  of 
the  handbook  was  delayed  in  order  to 
deal  more  fully  with  developments  in 
1916.  Reports  covering  this  period  were 
not  available  until  some  months  after 
the  close  of  the  year  and  advantage  was 
taken  of  this  delay  to  incorporate  con- 
siderable information  covering  the  early 
months  of  1917.  The  information  con- 
tained in  the  manual  will  doubtless  ap- 
peal, to  those  interested  in  the  subject, 
more  at  this  period  than  formerlly  owing 
to  the  greater  interest  that  is  being  tak- 
en in  the  minerals  of  Canada  as  a  re- 
sult of  the  war.  The  need  of  developing 
our  mineral  resources  is  becoming  more 
apparent  and  any  literature  that  will 
assist  towards  this  end  will  be  received 
with  greater  interest  on  this  account. 
The  publishers  have,  as  in  former  years, 
freely  used  extracts  from  government 
publications,  company  reports  and  tech- 
nical journals,  etc.,  which  fact  guaran- 
tees the  accuracy  of  the  data  contained 
in  the  volume.  The  manual  covers  all 
the  various  phases  of  mining  activity  in 
Canada  and  contains  much  useful  in- 
formation on  the  vari.otis  minerals  found 
in  this  country,  including  location  of  the 
mines,  physical  properties  of  the  min- 
erals and  methods  of  mining,  etc.  The 
sections  covering  coal,  copper  and  nickel 
are  of  partictilar  interest  at  this  time. 
A  list  of  mining  companies  and  their 
product  is  a  useful  feature  of  this  pub- 
lication. The  manual  is  fully  illustrated 
and  is  bound  in  attractive  red  cloth  cov- 


i    large    tray    and 
:iVile    tool    room    surf  a 
inery    wants— experts 


J.  E.  WING  &  SON,  "^^IkTJTc 


KINDLY   MENTION  THIS 

PAPER  WHEN   WRITING 

ADVERTISERS 


Write      for  complete    information    on 
Atlas   Arbor  Presses.  All   sizes    for  all 


ATLAS  PRESS  CO. 

330  N.  Park  St. 
Kalamazoo,  Mich.,     U.S.A. 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  D I A  N    M  A  CHIN  E  R  Y 


83 


Again 


The  Big  Exhibition 

of 

Foundry  and 
Machine  Shop 
Equipment 


C'(ime  and  see  the  mosl,  cmnplete 
ilisplay  of  labor-saving  niacliinerv 
and  plant  equipment  ever  housed 
under  one  roof. 
Send  your  General  Manager,  your 
( leneral  Superintendent,  your 
I'urchasing  Agent  and  Shop  Fore- 
men. Come  yourself.  Keep  your- 
self and  your  executives  posted  on 
new  equipment  and  ideas.  It 
means  dollars  to  you. 
There'll  be  no  idle  moments.  The 
entertainment  committee  has 
arranged  a  complete  program  of 
amusement.*,  trips,  etc. 
Don't  miss  it  this  year.  Write  us 
tn-dav  for  vour  hotel  reservation. 


Mechanics  Bldg. 

Boston,  Mass. 

Sept.  24-28 


American    Foundrymen's    Association 

Hotel  Lennox,  Boston,  Mass. 


(Exhibition    Headquarters) 


If   any   advertisement    interests,  you,   tear   it    out    now    and   place   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


LASSIFIED  ADVERTISINCt 


Rates  (payable  in  advance):  Two  cents  per  word  first  insertion;  one  cent  per  word  sub* 

sequent  insertions.     Count  five  words  when  boi  number  is  required.     Eacb  figure  counts 

as  one  word.     Minimum  order  $1.00.     Display  rates  on  application. 


FOR   SALE 


WANTED 


PAYING    PROPOSITION   FOR    RAILROADS 


adian   rights    with   fixtures.      Address   Franlc    Bay- 
Ipss,   311   Fair  Street,   Springfield.   Ohio.  c9m 


tjlOR  SALE  —  1  LEES-BRADNER  THREAD 
"  miller,  equipped  for  threading  nose  and  base 
of  6"  shells.  Apply  The  Hayes  Wheel  Co., 
Chatham,    Ontario.  c9m 


(jiECOND-HAND  26"  NEWTON  TYPE  COLD 
*^  saw  cutting-off  machine,  arranged  for  motor 
belt  drive  and  complete,  with  or  without  motor. 
Price  $600.00,  cars  Sherbrooke.  MacKinnon, 
Holmes  &  Co,,  Limited,  Sherbrooke,  Quebec.  clOm 


ONE  ARMINGTON  &  SIMS  10"  x  12"  HIGH 
speed  engine,  belted  to  one  Westinghouse 
Electric  Mfg.  Co.  direct  current  generator,  40 
K.W..  650  volts,  75  amps.  ;  speed  910  r.p.m.  ;  also 
40'  0"-10"  double  leather  belting:  all  in  good 
condition.  Armstrong,  Whitwortb  of  Canada, 
Limited,  Montreal,  Que.  c6m 


FOR  SALE— 1  NEW  26  H.P.  HOR.  TUBULAR 
boiler,  1  second-hand  12  H.P.  hor.  tubular 
boiler,  tested  to  150  lbs.  ;  1  second-hand  60  H.P. 
loc.  boiler ;  1  second-hand  Leonard  12  x  12  high 
speed  engine ;  1  second-hand  500-lb.  belt-driven 
Beaudry  power  hammer,  only  in  use  two  months ; 
in  perfect  condition.  Canadian  Engineering  & 
Mfg.    Co..    128    Bleury    St..    Montreal,    Que.        c9m 


■pOR  SALE— THE  TORONTO  ELECTRIC  COM- 
-^  missioners  have  for  sale  a  quantity  of  second- 
hand 60-cycIe  meters  and  transformers  recently  in 
service,  also  quantity  of  electrical  supplies.  List 
of  material  and  full  particulars  may  be  obtained 
on  application  to  the  Purchasing  Agent,  15  Wil- 
ton Avenue.  The  quantities  are  not  guaranteed, 
and  all  are  subject  to  prior  sale.  No  tender 
necessarily  accepted.  Toronto  Hydro-Electric  Sys- 
tem,   226   Yonge   St.,   Toronto.  c7m 


TTYDRAULIC  EQUIPMENT  FOR  SALE.— The 
equipment  listed  below  is  in  first-class  shape 
having  only  been  used  about  three  months.  Blue 
prints  and  specifications  and  foundations  draw- 
ings will  be  furnished.  2—14  x  12  x  6"  Fair- 
banks-Morse duplex  steam  driven  high  pressure 
pumps  at  80  gals,  per  minute  capacity  each 
against  600  lbs.  pressure,  steam  pressure  160  lbs. 
1 — Weighted  Accumulator  good  for  1000  lbs.  per 
sq.  inch.  16"  diameter,  plunger  11  ft.  stroke  with 
squeezing  water  cushion  and  wooden  outside 
bumper  blocks.  The  tank  for  the  weighing  mater- 
ial surrounding  the  cylinder  is  10'  7"  in  diameter 
and  11'  0"  high.  1 — Return  Suction  Tank  for 
above  pumps  and  accumulator.  Height,  9'  0", 
diameter  8'  0".  Capacity.  2700  Imperial  gallons. 
i'his  equipment  can  be  shipped  immediately  and 
kl  open  for  inspection  at  the  company's  plant, 
jr  rices  on  application.  The  Canadian  Copper  Com- 
^aiiy.   Copper  Cliff,   Ont.  c8m 


SPECIAL  MACHINERY 


H 

St.   w. 


C.   THOMAS.  GENERAL  MACHINE  SHOP. 


Toronto.      Telephone    Adelaide    3836.      t£ 


lv,rANUFACTURERS— WE    CAN     UNDERTAKE 
work   to   any   specification — munition   produc- 
tion    equipment     or     otherwise.       Write     W.     H. 
Sumbline  Machinery  Co.,  7  St.  Mary  St..  Toronto 


WANTED— SECOND-HAND  POWER  SQUAR- 
''  ing  shear  to  cut  No.  10  gauge  steel  up  to 
24"  wide.  Must  be  in  good  working  condition. 
Packard    Electric    Company,    St.    Catharines.    Ont. 

c4m 


SITUATIONS  WANTED 


"PRACTICAL  WORKS  MANAGER  AND  ME- 
-'-  chanical  expert  with  years  of  experience  in 
United  States  and  Canada,  a  specialist  in  muni- 
tion work,  open  for  engagement.  Best  of  refer- 
ences.    Apply  Box   304,   Canadian  Machinery. 


A^TACHINE  SHOP  FOREMAN  DESIRES 
-^^  change  as  shop  foreman  or  master  mechanic- 
Acquainted  with  scientific  management :  26  years' 
experience.     Box  328  Canadian  Machinery.      cllm 


A  PRACTICAL  MACHINE  SHOP  SUPERIN- 
"^   tendent    of    broad    experience    in    Canada    and 

States  wants  position  as  superintendent  or  general 
foreman.  Large  or  small  shop  on  ammunition  or 
machinery ;  Al  references.  Address  Box  327, 
Canadian    Machinery.  c9m 


■pMPLOYMENT  AGENT  OR  EMPLOYEE- 
-'-'  interviewer  position.  Lady,  middle-aged,  pos- 
sessing keen  discernment,  educated  above  the 
average,  good  correspondent  (shorthand  writer, 
typist),  desires  position  as  above  with  large  firm 
of  engineers  or  any  factory,  to  interview  em- 
ployees and  referees.  Moderate  salary  desired. 
Toronto  Engineering  Agency,  57  Queen  W.,  To- 
ronto. 


FOR 

IMMEDIATE 
DELIVERY 

No.  28— 17"  X  96"  Brown  & 
Sharpe  Plain  Grinder. 

Pratt  &  Whitney  Vertical  Sur- 
face Grinder,  36"  Table. 

No.  IVo  Bath  Universal  Grin- 
der, complete  tool  room 
equipment. 

No.  iy2  Landis  Universal  Grin- 
der, for  Internal  and  Ex- 
ternal Grinding. 

36  ft.  Niles  Plate  Planer. 

Lynd-Farquhar    Co. 

Boston,  Massachusetts 


SITUATIONS  WANTED 


A  PRACTICAL  MACHINE  SHOP  SUPERIN- 
■^  tendent  of  broad  experience  in  Canada  and 
States  will  be  open  for  position  as  superintend- 
ent or  general  foreman,  July  15th.  Al  refer- 
ences. Address  Producer,  Box  321,  Canadian 
Machinery.  c3m 


SITUATIONS  VACANT 

-\rAN  WANTED  TO  ACT  AS  SUPERINTEND- 
^'^  ent  of  a  fast  growing  die  and  stamping  plant 
in  City  of  Toronto.  Box  329,  Canadian  Machin- 
ery.        '  cl2m 

"V'lGHT  SUPERINTENDENT  FOR/ SHELL  MA- 

-^  chinery  plant  in  Western  Canada  ;  knowledge 
of  four  point  five  shell  and  good  all-round  ex- 
perience essential.  Write,  stating  qualifications. 
salary  and  references,  otherwise  application  will 
not  be  considered.     Box  325.  Canadian  Machinery. 

c6m 


XpOREMAN    WANTED— FOR    SHOP    IN    CEN- 

tre  of  Toronto,  with  up-to-date  equipment, 
employing  about  thirty  men,  doing  jobbing  busi- 
ness and  making  fine  special  machinery  and 
tools.  When  applying  state  experience  and  give 
references,  also  wages  expected.  Only  first-class 
men   need   apply.     Box   326,    Canadian   Machinery. 

c8m 


"ry  ANTED  —  ASSISTANT  SUPERINTENDENT 
for  six-inch  shell  factory.  Must  be  capable 
of  getting  maximum  production  from  an  estab- 
lished plant  and  have  good  mechanical  experience. 
Duties  to  consist  chiefly  in  supervising  production. 
Give  full  particulars  in  writing  of  previous  ex- 
perience, age.  references,  and  salary  required,  to 
Henry  Hope  &  Sons  of  Canada.  Ltd.,  Peterboro. 
All  information  will  be  treated  in  the  strictest 
confidence.  cSm 


PRESS 
EQUIPMENT 

FOR  SALE 

50— No.    18    Bliss   Type    Inclinable 
Presses. 

6— No.    19    Bliss   Type    Inclinable 
Presses,  with  roll  feeds. 

1 — Double  Acting    (Michigan) 
Press. 

1 — Double    Acting    (Rhodes   Eng- 
land) Press. 

1 — Brown-Boggs    Multiple   Power 
Shears. 

A  large  number  of  these  presses 
are  equipped  with  Dial  Feeds.  Have 
only  been  used  for  a  few  months — 
good  as  new.  Will  be  sold  at  a 
bargain    if   purchased   at   once. 

Apply    7  02    Excelsior    Life   Building 
TORONTO 

dOm 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


85 


FOR  SALE 

Equipment    used    for    making 
18-pr.  Shells. 

1— Warner    &    Swasey    Turret    Lathe,    2"    x    24". 

with    attachments. 
1— Linderman    Double    Spuidle    Boring    Machine, 

with    attachments    for    finish    boring    shrapnel 

and   nose    turning   H.E. 
1— Flather  &  Co.   U"  x  5'   0"  Lathe,   with  chuck 

and  countershaft, 
1— Fosdick  16"  x  G'   0"   Lathe,   with  collet  chuck 

and    coimtershaft. 
1— Braopose  16"   x  6'   0"   Lathe,  collet  chuck  and 

taper    attachment 
1— Goldie  &  McCulloch  Nosing  Press  with  DieB. 
1— Bcatty   Accumulator. 
1— Lees-Bradner  Thread  Miller,  with  attachments 

and  countershaft 
1— Jones   &    Lamson   Turret   Lathe,   2"   x   24^. 
1^40.gal]on    Bowser    Tank    and    Pump ;    good    as 


l,^-;Connection   Pyrometer  with  Rheostat,  made 

by   Taylor   Instrument  Co. 
1— Thermo    Couples.    S&"    long,    bent    12»'4"    from 

1— Thermo   Couples.  38"  long,  atraight 

1— One-Connection    Tycos    Pyrometer,    made    by 

Taylor  Co. 
1— Bertram    Band    Turning    Attachment,    for   ?A" 

Lathe,    Ball-bearing  Centre. 

AU     the     above     located     at     Welland.       Prices. 
Delirery    and    full    particulars    gladly    furnished. 


M.  Beatty  &  Sons,  Limited 
Welland,  Ont. 


FOR   SALE 

4 — 14    X    6    Flather    Engine    Lathes.    C.R.. 

Q.C.G.,   new. 
4 — 14  X  5  Reed  Engine  Lathes.  R.  &  F. 
3 — 18  X  8  Davis  Engine  Lathes.  D.B.G. 
1 — 18    X    10    Rahn-Larmon    Engine    Lathe. 

1 — 18    X    12    Rahn-Larmon    Engine    Lathe. 

new. 
1—22"   X    10'    Nicholson    &    Waterman  En- 
gine  Lathe. 
l_No.  13  B.  &  S.  Automatic  Gear  Cutter. 
1 — 30"    Newarlt    Automatic    Gear    Cutter. 
1—5  X  48  Pratt  &  Whitney  Plain  Grinder. 
1— No.   2    Bath    Universal    Grinder. 
1 — 12   X  «0  Modern   Plain   Grinder,   new. 
2 — Lees-Bradner    Thread    Millers. 
1 30  X  30  X   8'    Powell  Planer,   new. 

Brownell    Machinery    Co. 
Providence,  R.  I. 


NOW! 


You've  been  going  to  send 
in   that   ad  for  weeks,   so 
why  not  mail  it  now  for 
next  week's  issue? 
CANADIAN  MACHINERY 

ClmiiiirJ    Adi'crtiung    ,VrrI,.,n 

143-153  University  Ave.  Toronto 


H.  W.  PETRIE 

of  MONTREAL 

Limited 
Montreal,  Que. 

LIST  OF  NEW  AND  USED 
MACHINERY  IN  STOCK 

FOR 
IMMEDIATE   SHIPMENT 

ENGINE  LATHES 

New    U"    I    5'    Lancaster    Sgl.    B.G..    Geared 

Feed. 
New    16"    X   6'    South    Bend,    SgL    B.Q.,    Stan. 

Change  Gears. 
New    16"    %    6'    South   Bend,   Sgl.    B.Q.,    Stan. 

Change    Gears. 
New    15"    X    7'     Oliver    DM.    B.G.,    Q.C.    Gear. 

OH    Pump    and    Pan. 
New    16"    I    24"    x    K)'     South    Bend    Gap    Sgl. 

B.G..    Stan.    Change    Gears. 
S.H.    17"    X    8'    Greaves    Klusman    Sgl.    B.G., 


Geared    Feed. 

8'    Greaves    Klusman    Dbl.    B.G., 


Geared    Feed. 
New    18"    X    8'    Giddings    &    Lewis    Dbl.    B.G.. 

Geared    Feed. 
New    IS"    X    8'     Stevens    Sgl.    B.Q.,    Standard 

Change    Gears. 
New   18"    X   8'   South    Bend  Sgl.    E.G.,    Stand. 

Change    Gears. 
S.H.    18"    X    10'    Mullei    Sgl.     B.G.,    Standard 

Change    Gears. 
New    18"    X    12'    South    Bend    Sgl.    B.G..    Stand. 

Change   Gears. 
S.H.    20"    X    10'    Flather    Sgl.    E.G..    Standard 

Change   Gears. 
S.H.  38"  X  10'   Fay  &  Scott  Sgl.   E.G..   Stand. 

Change    Gears. 

HEAVY  DUTY  MANUFACTURING 
LATHES 

New    20"    X   8'    Petrie    Heavy    Duty   Manufactur- 
ing Lathes. 

TURRET.  SPEED  AND  BRASS  LATHES 
SCREW  MACHINES 

.New  13"  I 
S.H.   15"  X  -     . 

Attachment.  „  .    .        „  .-, 

S  H     30"    X    10'    Vllter    Lathe,    Fnction    B.Q.. 

Geared  Feed  with  IS"  Hex.  Power  Feed  Tur- 


ret 


DRILLS 


New  20"  Excelsior,  Back  Geared  Wheel  Lever. 
Power  Feed.  ,     ,„      ,     , 

New  SO"  Silver,  BacR  Geared  Wheel  Lever 
Power  Feed.  .,  .    „     « 

New  14"  Leland  Giltord  Single  Spmdle  Sensi- 
tive. 

S.H.   14"   Avey   Spingle  Spindle  Sensitive. 

S.H.  14"  Foote-Burt  Four. 

New  No.  1  Emco  Bench  Single. 

HACK  SAW  MACHINES 

New  Peerless  High  Speed. 
New  No.   1  Rapid. 

GRINDING  AND  BUFFI  NG  MACHINES 

New  30"    Ford    Smith  Water  Tool   Grinder. 

New  18"  Ford  Smith  S.O.  General  Purpose  Pe- 
destal Grinder.                    «          ,  .^  n 

New  16"  Ford  Smith  S.O.  General  Purpose  Pe- 
destal Grinder.                     „           ,    „  o 

New  12"   Ford  Smith  S.O.   General   Purpose  Fc- 

New  12"   Ford   Smith  S.O.   Combination  Grinder 

and   Buffer. 
New  12"  Ford  Smith  3.0.  Buffmg  Machine. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

S  H    No    22  Garvin  Vertical  Milling  Machine. 
s'h'   *No.   0  Burhe  Hand   MUling   Machine. 
New  W  National  Bolt  Cutter  with  Lead  Scr™ 

.attachment. 
New  No    1  Grabo  Metal  Saw  Table. 
New  n4  Rock  Biver  Slitting  Shear. 
New   No.   4   Chicago  Oteel   Bending  Brake. 

Telegraph.   Phone  or  Write  for  Prices  and 
Further    Particulars 

H.  W.  PETRIE  of  MONTREAL 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL,  QUEBEC 


PETRIE'S  LIST 

Of  New  andUsed  Machine  Tools  Stock 
for  IMMEDIATE  DELIVERY 

TURRET   LATHES  AND  SCREW 
MACHINES 

l.'>"  X   5^, '    American,   fox. 

lli"  X  .5'-''    Pratt  &  Whitney. 

16"  X  6'  'Pratt  &  Whitney,  turret 

■id"  X   7'    Fay   &  Scott. 

22"  X  8'    Pratt  &  Whitney. 

24"  X    10'    Conradson,  D.B.G. 

24"  X  8'    Lodge  &   Shipley. 

2G"  X  8'  Fay  &  Scott.  E.G. 

1!"    X    24"    Stevens   Screw    Machine. 

No.  2  Warner  &  Swasey,  plain  head. 

No.  6   Warner  &   Swasey,  friction  head. 

ENGINE    LATHES 
13"  X  6'   Filsmith.  D.B.G. 
14"   X  6'    Lodge  &   Shipley. 
1.5"  X  8'   Sebastian,  back  geared. 
16"  X  8'  McDougall,    back    geared. 
17"  X  8'    Blaisdell.   hack-ge»red. 
IS"   X   6"   New    Haven. 
Is"  X  S'   C.M.C..  double  back  geared. 
IB"  X  10'    Putnam,    back-geared. 
20"  X  8'   Fifield.  back  geared. 
21"   X   8'    Bawden.   heavy  duty. 
24"  X   11'    Pond,   back-geared. 
30"  X  10'  Ames,  back  geared. 
31"  X   16'    Fifield.   back-geared. 
18"  X  32"  X  12'   C.M.G.  gap. 
24"  X   40"  X  20'   Dundas,  gap. 
28"  X  50"  X  24'   Bertram,  gap. 

DRILLS 

13"   Perfect.   2-spindle. 
16"   Barr,  sliding  head. 
18"   Buffalo,  post  drill 
20"    Perfect,    lever   feed. 
20"    Silver,    back-geared. 
22"   Barnes,  back-geared. 
24"  Kerkhoff.  sliding  head. 
40"  Bickford.  back  geared. 
46"    Allfree.    upright. 
64"  Cancdy-Otto,  wall  radial. 
No.    10a    Baush,    16-8pindle. 
D-1   Colburn.   heavy   duty. 

GRINDERS 
No.   1   Cincinnati,   universal  tool. 
No.  2  Landis. 
No.    2    Sellers,    universal. 
No.  8  Modern,  universal. 
M",   3    La   Salle,   plain   and  surface. 

Barnes,   wet  tool. 

Gardner,  disk. 


24 
26' 

IRON    PLANERS 
20"  X  20"  X  5'  Bertram. 
24"  X  24"  X  6 Ml'  Bertram. 
26"  X  25"  X  12'   Lodge  &  Davis. 
36"  X  36"  X  10'   Sellers.  4  heads. 
40"  X  40"  X  12'  New  Haven,  power  fee*. 

MILLING   MACHINES 

Bertram,    plain. 

Brown  &  Sharpe.  power  feed,  plain. 

Kitchburg.   geared,   plain. 

Van    Norman,    bench. 

No.  2  Ford-Smith. 

No.  6  Whitney,  hand  feed. 

SHAPERS. 

16"    Canada   Mach.    Corp. 
16"    Queen    City,    back   geared. 
24"    Bertram,    back   geared. 
24"  Gould  &  Eberhardt. 
30"  Morton,  draw  cut. 

MISCELLANEOUS 
6"    and    12"    Racine    Hack    Saws. 
4"  and  6"  Robertson  Hack  Saws. 
6"   Kennedy   Cutting-off  Machine. 
12"  Hall  Pipe  Machine. 
No.   2   Colburn   Keyseater. 
No    5   Grant  Rotary  Riveting   Hammer. 
Nos.   1   and  3^!   Grcenerd   Arbor   Presses. 
No    2  Bliss  Foot-power  Press. 
No.  3  West  Tire  Setter  Banding  Press. 
Brown-Boggs   Punching  Press. 
Bertram    Single-end    Punch   and   btiear. 
No.  3  Dundas  Double-end  Punch  and  Shear. 
7'   Geared  Bending  Rolls. 
1600-lb.   Toledo   Drop   Hammer. 
450-lb.    Williams   Drop   Hammer. 

H.W.  PETRIE,  LTD. 

FRONT  STREET  WEST,  TORONTO 


//   any   advertisement  interests   you.    tear  it  out   now   and   place  with    letters  to  be  answered. 


86 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  X    yi  A  C  H  I  X  P:  R  Y 


Volume  XVin. 


GOOD  USED 
EQUIPMENT 

ELECTRIC  TRAVELINiG  OKANES. 

20-Ton.  56'   3"  span,  three  motor,  110  volts,  D.C. 
26-Ton    trolley,    three   motor,   220   volU,    D.C. 
lu-Ton,  40'   span,  SO'   lift,   three  motor. 
5-Ton,  47'   0"  span,   three  motor,  220  V.,  D.C. 
Crane   Motor-i.   10  and  4',i   H.P..   220   V.,    D.C. 
lO-Ton  hand  crane.   So'   0"  span. 
20-Ton   hand   crane,   29'    6"  span. 
2-Ton  hand  cranes,  22'   span. 

PUXOHKS  A^'D  SHEARS. 

Jjever    Shear    Idoiible),    cap.    2"    sq. 

'Jf'    throat    (smgle),    cap.    %x%"    (belt). 

48"    throat    (single),    cop.    3xl!<."    (steam). 

16"    throat    (single),    cap.    lV4xH4    (belt). 

56"    throat    (single),    cap.    %\%'    (belt). 

L5"    throat    (single),    cap.    %^Vt"    (hand). 

10"    throat    (double),    cap.    1^x1"    (belt). 

Scpiaring   Shear,   53"   cap..    14  gauge^ 

Angle    Shear    (double),    cap.    6x6x%"    (belt). 

Plate   Shear  (Univ.),   18"   blade,   cap.    %"■ 

Rotary   splitting.    30"    throat,    cap.    %  . 

Rotary    bevel.    5"    throat,    cap.    ^".     _ 

Coidter    &    McKenzie.    cap.    3s'.4",   sprmg  steel. 

Guillotine.    Perkins,    No.    6,    cap.   2%"    sq. 

jTISCBUjANBOUS. 

\jax   Bolt   Header   and   Upcsetter.   2Vi"   cap. 
.Acme   Bolt   Header  and   Upsetter.   IW   cap. 
Bulldozer,   No.   12  Ajax,   30"  stroke. 
Bending   Roll,   6'.   drop   end,   6^4  and   8"   rolls. 
Lathe.    M"   x   10'    American,    latest. 
Grinder,   No.  10  B.   &  S.   Plain,  ,  „    , 

Grinder,   No.   13,  B.   &  S.    Universal  and  Tool. 
Rotary    Planer.    36".    Cleveland   No.    2. 
Saw.    cold.   26"  blade,   48"   travel. 
Press   (trimming)   No.   11   Perkins.  16,500  Ihs. 
Rolling  Mill.  1  stand,  2  high.  30"  bet.  housmgs. 
First-class   condition— quick    shipments. 

McCoy-Brandt  Machinery  Co. 

Office  and  Warehouse  : 

216-218  Penn  Ave.,      Pittsburgh,  Pa. 


C.  W.  CULLEN 

MACHINERY  CO. 

LEADER-NEWS   BUILDING 
CLEVELAND,  OHIO 

Bickford  4i.V  Plain  Radial  Drill,  cone  drive. 
No.  3  Lapointe  Broaching  Machine,  new. 
2— P.  &  W.  No.  2  Cutting-oti;  Machines. 
Bement  Miles  &  Co.  7^4"  Vertical  Spindle 
Crank     Drilling     and     Boring    Mill,     68" 
swing. 
Detroit   Japanning    Ovens,    8'    10"   x    8*    x 

152". 
Pratt   &    Whitney   48"   Gap   Lathe. 
Hanna  30-ton  Riveter,   12"  reach. 
Pangborn    Sand    Blast,    90"    rotary    table, 
M.D. 
3— 800-ton    Gen.   El.   Hydraulic   Double  Ac- 
tion   Presses. 
3 — 21i    Cleveland    Automatics  ;   prac.    new. 
10—^4"   B.   &    S.   Automatics. 
Allis    Chalmers    150    H.P.    Corliss    Engine, 

12'   F.W. 
Bruce  MacBeth  150  H.P.  Gas  Engine;  new. 
2-  Rathmann  Jones   Gas  Engines,   125  and 

22.1  H.P. 
80"    Niles  Vert.  Boring   and   Turning  Mill. 

2   heads,  slotting  attachment. 
Ineersoll-Rand     Air     Comp.,     342     cu.     ft., 

steam  driven,  inter-cooler,  complete. 
Bertsch    Straiprhtening    Rolls,    7"    x    84"-3'' 

vert.  adj.  M.D. 
Kelly    Springfield    10-ton    Road    Roller,    re- 
built. 
Vulcan    1    cu.    yd.    Steam    Shovel,   traction  ; 

weight  35  tons :  new  flues. 
62-ton    Baldwin    Consolidation    Locomotive. 
Ajax  No.  1  Taper  Forging  Rolls.  50  strokes. 
One  No.  5  S-3  Cold  Langelier  Swadger. 
3 — No.  7  H.S.-6  Langelier  Swadger. 
1 — Bolt  and   Rivet  Header,  hand   feed,    %" 

X  3V^"  rivets. 
Bolt  and  Rivet  Header,  hand  feed,  %"  x  4" 

rivets. 
70-C  Bucyrus   Steam  Shovel,  St.   G. 
R.   Is.   Locomotive,    45  tons,    St.    G. 


Eastern  Machinery  &  Equipment  Co.,  Inc. 

PHILADELPHIA,  PA. 


319  COMMERCIAL  TRUST  BUILDING 

NEW    TOOLS     FOR    IMMEDIATE 
DELIVERY. 

4—12"  X  36"    Bridgeport   Grindera, 


1-42" 


._,..._         _     Selleis    Tool    Grinder. 
30—18"  X  9'    Turning  and    Boring  Lathes. 
3—26  X  14'    Am.    Patt.    Eng.    Lathe. 
3— Double    head    Sullivan    Grinders. 
1— SL"'    X    12'    Pittsburgh    Engine    Lathe. 
1— 2v"    Ohio   Shaper. 

USED  MACHINERY 

ENGINE    LATHES. 

4--Nfiv   36"    X   25'    VVickes    Engme   Lathes,    quick- 

iliange    gear,   double   back   gear. 
S — ^w"  X  10'    American    Gear   head    A-1. 
5— X"  X  8'    Lotlge  &   Shipley,  geared   head,   q.cg. 
1—20"  X  10'    Bullard. 
1—24"  X  6'    Bullard. 
3-31"  X  14'    American. 

TURRET   LATHES. 

9-18"    X    6'    Warner   &    Swasey    Hexagon    Tunet, 
geared  friction   head. 
36^Potler   &    Johnson    6A    Automatic    Tunet    Ma- 

3—3  X  36  Jones  &   Lamson   Flat  Turret. 

2— 214"   X  3i"  Jones  &  Lamson   Flat  Turret,  bar 

equipment.      Full    set    Turret    Tools. 
!>-n25i"     Gisholt     12"    Collet    chuck    6H"    hole    in 

spindle   threading  lathe. 
3—26"    Putnam    heavy    duty    lathe. 
—14"  X  6'   Lodge  &  Shipley  Tunet.     Backgeared. 
5-3!"    Gisholt   2-step   cone.    6V4   H.S. 

BORING  MILLS. 
1— Binsse    Horizontal    Boring    Mill,    3"    bar. 
6 — 66"    swing    Bement-iMiles    Tire    Turning    Mills, 

two    swivel    heads— 15^"    under    rail. 
1—37"   Baush  Boring  Mill,  2  heads,   good   as  new. 
1— Cylinder  boring  mill,   capacity  of  24"  diam.    to 

96"    diam.    10'    long. 


quipment    included,   good   as  new. 

Bullard    Boring   vMill    (2)    heads. 
MILLING   MACHINES. 
1— No.   3  LeBIond   Plain  .MUler.    table  1314  x  56V.. 
I— No.    2    Kempsmith,    table    10'    x    46". 
1—24"    X    8'    Beaman    &    Smith    Open    Side    Slab 

^Miller,     wilh    two    vertical    spindles. 
1— No.    U4    Universal    Milling    -Maohine. 

GEAR    CUTTERS. 
1— M"    Fellows    Gear    Shaper. 
2-36"    Fellows    Gear    Shapets. 

SCREW     CUTTING     MACHINES. 
1—2"    Cleveland    automatic. 

1 — No.   55  National  Acme  4  spindle,   good  as  new. 
1— No.  M  National   .\cme  4  spindle,   good  as  nen- 

SLOTTERS    AND    SRAPERS. 
1—9"    Bement    Slotter. 
1—12"    Bement    Slotter. 
1—30-    Wharton    Slotter. 
1-20"    Gould    &    Eberharlt    Shaper.      B.G.      Vise. 

1—16"  Steptoe  Shaiier. 

GRINDERS. 

8—12"    X   36"    Bridgeport. 

1— Pi"   Full    Universal    Landis   Machine. 

1— .No.    13    Brown    &    Sharpe    Universal    and    Tool 

Grinder.      Full    equipment. 
No.   Ih^  Universal  Cutter  and   Reamer  Grinder. 
1—28"    Bridgeport   Face    Grinder,    with    magnetic 

chuck. 
5— Fisher   Profile   Grinders  for  Cutters. 
1— No.    28    Brown    &    Sharpe    Plain    Grinder,    17" 

X    96". 
5—.\o.  6  Std.   Universal  Tool  &  Cutter  Grioders- 

DRILL    PRESSES. 
1—31"    Bickford    Upright   back    gear   sliding  head 


FOR  SALE 

MOTORS 

GENERATORS 

TRANSFORMERS 

25  and    60  Cycle 

If 

You  Have 

Electrical    Equipment 

For  Sale 

Send  Particulars  to 

E.  A.  LOWRY 

209  King  St.,  Guelph,  Ontario 


Watch 
These  Pages ! 

EA'ERY  week  new 
propositions  are 
offered     here. 
Look  them  all  over, 
you  maj'  find  at  least 
one  to  interest  you. 

If  you  don't  find 
what  you  want,  in- 
.«ert  a  "liner"  ad 
d  e  .«  c  r  i  b  i  n  g  your 

needs. 

Canadian      IMachinery 

Classified  Advertising  Section 
143  University  Ave.        -       Toronto 


The  Great  Business  of  Selling 


M 


ULTIPLYING  users  of  your  product, 
ommodity  or  service — this  is  your 
great   business.      The   more,    the   mer- 


The  factor  of  multiplication  is  advertising. 
Nothing  else  can  get  you  new  users  in  the 
shortest   possible   time   at   lowest   cost. 

Use  magazines  for  long-living  publicity 
effects. 

Use  them  for  Economy's  sake. 
Use  them  for  Prestige. 


In  Canada,  the  one  conspicuous  magazine 

MACLEAN'S 

MAGAZINE 

It    is    an    all-thc-family    magazine    of    the 
highest  class — clean,  esteemed,  established 
Can  you  name  a  better? 
The  conclusion  is  plain. 

Published  bjr 

The  MacLean  Publishing  Co.,  Limited 

143-153    University    Avenue.  Toronto.   Ontario 


//  ivhat  you  need  t«  7wt  advertised,  cotisult   our   Buyers'   Directory   and   write   advertisers   listed   tinder   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


87 


(( 


Williams"  List  of  Machine  Tools 

FOR  IMMEDIATE  SHIPMENT 


New  Lathes 

:!— 16 

\ 

S 

•CISCO" 

4—18 

X 

1(t 

"CISCO" 

12—17 

y 

s 

Le  BLOND 

1-.— 19 

X 

10 

Le    BIX)ND 

6—21 

X 

K 

Le  BIyOND 

1—25 

X 

10 

Le  BLOXD 

0—24 

X 

12 

C.XI.C. 

Used 

.(—16   X   6  CINCINNATI    Q.C.G. 

.T— 20  X  10  HINDMAN 

2—20  X  10  LODGE  &   SHIPLEY    (geared 
head) 

R— 22   X    10  PrTN.VM 

1—24  X  16  BERTR.UM 

1—27    X    16    REED    PRENTICE 

1^-24"   DAVIS   Boring  Turret   Lathes 

7— IS"   I,IBBY    Turret    Lathes 
No.  2  WARNER  &  SWASET  Turret 
2  X  24  JONES  &  LAMSflN  Turrets 

Automatics 

2—2  X   REED  PRENTICE 

:'.— 2  X   REED  PRENTICE 
lO— 2^4  CLEVELAND 
IS— 6A  POTTER  &  JOHNSON 

Drills 

New   2S"   BARNES 
IV— 26"   BARNE.S 
.1—25"   SUPERIOR 
1— 22U-'    BARNES 
1—24"   AT-RORA 
1—26"   AURORA 
2— D  1.  COLBURN 
•1- D  8.  COI/BtTRN 
1— New    BUFFALO    Heavy    Duty 


New  Radials 

1—21.,'    FOSDICK    CONE    TYPE. 

1—4'  'MUELLER    HEAVY    DUTY     (spetd 

box    dri\el. 
1— .5'    REED-PRENTICE   (speed  box  drive). 

New    Shapers 

1—14"  SMITH  &  MILLS  • 
4—16"  SMITH  &  MILLS 
2—20"  SMITH  &  MILLS 
3—20"  GOULD  &  EBERHARDT 
2—24"  GOULD  &  EBERHARDT 
1—28"  GOULD  &    EBERHARDT. 

Millers 

New  2H  Le  BLOND  UNIVERSAL. 
.New   S   H.    Le    BLOND    UNIVERSAL 
New   No.  2-|  BECKER    PLAIN 
No.  2  CINCINNATI   UNIVERSAL 
No.  2  KEARNEY  &  TRECKER 

Pinners 

S6  X  36  X  11  INDUSTRIAL 
36  X  36  X  12  C.M.C. 

52   X  52  X   16     McKECKNIE      BERTR-^M 
(two  heads) 

Slotters 
SV>"  BBRTR.«I 
10"  BBRTRAII 
10"   SMITH,  PBX.\COCK  &  TAXNET 

Miscellaneous 

.3000  lb.  MORGAN  Steam   Hammer 
BERTRAM  Horizontal  Boring  Machine 
32'  rX)NDON  Vertical  Boring  Mill 
NEWTON  Vertical  Miller 

This  'is  only  a  partial  list. 

Write  stating  your  needs. 


A.  R.  WILLIAMS  MACHINERY  CO.,  LIMITED 

64  Front  Street  West  Toronto,  Ontario 


Chas.    A.    Strelinger  Co., 

43-51    E.   Larned  St., 
DETROIT  MICH. 

Machine  Tools  For  Immediate 
Delivery 

DRILLING    MACHINES 
linrke    Bench    Sensitive    Drills. 
Henry   &    Wright   High   Speed    B.B.    Drills. 
No.    3    Barnes   Horizontal    Radial   Drill. 
21/'     Silver    Stationary    Head    Drills,    sq.     base. 

W.    &    L.    Feed. 
.No.    1-S    Gamn    B.6.    Horiz.    Drill   with   pump 

and    piping. 
No.   102  Harrington  S.S.   Drill,  belt  drive,  elev. 

table. 

GRINDERS 
No.    3    Gardner   B.B.    Polishing    Lathes. 
Diamond   Bmerv  Grinders,   10",   12",   16".   21". 
.Model    "B"    Fitchburg   Hand    Feed    Grinders. 
No.  2  Diamond  Aut.   Surface  Grinders   (36x12x12) 

belt  driven. 
No.    3    Wilmarth    &    Merman   Surface    Grinders. 
No.   2  Oakley  Universal   Cutter  and  Tool  Grind- 

Bloimt   14"    Wet   Tool   Grinders. 

LATHES 
lialton  6"  X  33"  Lathe,   Type  B-4  with  c.  shaft. 
.No.   5^   Sloane   &  Chase  Bench  Lathe  with  c. 

shaft. 
IS"  X  8'    .Monarch   Q.C.,    D.B.G.    Engine   Lathe. 
17"  X  8'    Sidney  Q.C.,  3-step   cone,    D.B.G.    En- 
gine   Lathes. 
No.    65-E    13"  X  6'    Seneca    Falls    Lathe    with    c. 

shaft. 
No.    MC    13"    X   6'    South    Bend    Screw    Cutting 

Lathe.  

SCREW     ilACTHINES 
No.   2  and  No.  3  Foster  pi.  hd.   Screw  Machines 

with    .\\n.    Chuck   and   Wire   Feed. 
No.    1-B    Foster    Un.    Turret    Lathe    with    3-jaw 

Scroll   Chuck,    splash    guards,    belt    drive. 
No.    3    Foster    Friction    Hd.    Un.    Turret    Lathe 

with    Aut.   Chuck,    Wire    Feed,    and   Chasing 

Bar. 
No.    1  Foster  Friction  Hd.   Screw   Machine  with 

.\ut.    Chuck.    Wire    Feed,    and    Power    Feed 

to    Turret    Slide. 
Nil.     1     New    Howe     P!.     Hd.     Screw     Machine 

with   Aut.    Chuck   and   Wire    Feed. 
MILLING    MACHINES 
.No.     38-8     Chicago    .Machine    Tool     Co.     Small 

Milling   MaclliJie   with    Universal   Centers. 
No.    1    Standard    Hand    Millers    with   c.    shaft. 
H.     B.     Smith    Hand    Miller    countershaft. 

Hand    .Miller    with    vise,    arbor    and 
shaft. 


Machinery,    Biar    Stock, 

Twist  Drills,  Dies  &  Taps 

For  Sale 

MACHINE  TOOLS. 

.3— Rickert-Shafer    Vertical    Tapping   Ma- 
chines   (used). 
1-  Power   Hack   Saw    (used). 
1— No.    1    Sheldons   Exhauster. 
1— Stewart  Gas  Furnace   (used). 
1— No.   200   Oil   Extractor    (new). 
6— No.    4    Smurr    &    Kamen    Screw    Ma- 
chines,     Auto.      Chuck.      W.F.,      E.G. 
(used). 

BAR  STOCK. 
33.000   lbs.    l%"    Round   CD.    Screw  Stock. 
1.500   lbs.    ^i"    Round    CD.    Screw   Stock. 
TWIST  DRILLS   (Straight  Shank) 
48—13   16"  Left-hand,  high  speed  steel. 
18-21   32"  Right  hand,  high  speed  steel. 
36—41  64"   Left  hand,   high  speed  steel. 
12^17  32"  Right  hand,  high  speed  steel. 
108— 33,  64"  Right  hand,  high  speed  steel. 
84 — 33/64"   Right  hand,  carbon  steel. 
191— 13 '32"  Right  hand,  carbon  steel. 
59 — Vi"   Left  hand,   carbon  steel. 
36— B    Right   hand,    carbon   steel. 
71— No.  1  Left  hand,  carbon  steel. 
48--NO.  4  Right  hand,  carbon  steel. 
161— No.   6    Right  hand,   high   speed  steel, 
gl — No.   25    Left  hand,   carbon  steel. 
50— No.   26   Right  hand,   high  speed  steel. 
200— No.   27   Right  hand,   carbon   steel. 
240 — No.  45  Right  hand,  high  speed  steel. 
DIES   AND   TAPS. 
13 — No.   5B   Modern    Opening   Dies    (used). 
16— Set    1.998"-14    Whitworth    Chasers   for 
above  heads   (new). 
4— No.  43  Modern  Opening  Dies   (used). 
12— Set    1%"-14    Whitworth    Chasers    for 
above. 
10 — No.    4    Manufacturers    Equipment    Co. 
Collapsible  Taps    (used). 
1.5— Set    1.378"-14    Whitworth    Chasers    for 
above   taps. 

The  Packard   Fuse  Co.,    Ltd. 

St.  Catharines,  Ont.  cl3m 


RIVERSIDE 
Machinery  List 

We  Own  Every  Tool  Offered 

ENGINE   LATHES 

1—28  X  10     Hamilton     Standard     Engine     Lathe, 

with    turret. 
1-28   X   15    Putnam   Standard   Engine  (Lathe. 
1—22   X   14   Putnam   Standard    Engine    Lathe. 
1—22   X   10   Heed    Standard   Engine   Lathe. 
1—22  X  S  Reed  Standard  Engine  Lathe, 
i— .New    18  X  8   Springfield   Engine   Lathes. 
1— .New   16  I  8  Springfield   Engine   Lathe. 
l^New    14  I  6    Springfield    Engine    Lathe. 
1—18  X  6     Jones     &     Lamson     Standard     Engine 

Lathe. 
2—16  I  8   Reed  Stud   Lathes. 
1—16  X  8    Porter    Standard    Engine   Lathe. 
1—14  X  8    Sebastian    Standard    Engine    Lathe. 
1—14  X  6  Springfield   Engine  Lathe. 
1—14  X  6    Prentiss    Engine    Lathe. 
1—14  X  6   SelMstian    Engine    Lathe. 
2—14  X  6    Van    Werk    Engine   Lathes. 
1— No.    3    Hartiarge    Bench    Lftthe, 

TURRET    AND    SCREW    MAOHINB8 

1-21"    Gisholt   Turret   Lathe. 

2— No.   6-.\  Potter  &  Johnson  Automatic  Lathes. 

1-2%  X  2i  Jones  &  'Lamson  Flat  Turret  Lathe, 
S.G.H. 

1—2  X  M    Jones    &    Lanason    Flat    Turret    Lathe, 
cone    head. 

3— No.   4   Foster  F.G.H.   Hand  Screw   Machines 

1— No.  4  .Smurr  &   Kamon  Hand  Screw  .Machine. 

1— No.   6  Pierson   F.G.H.   Hand  Screw  Machine 

4 -New  14"   Pierce  Turret   Lathes. 

2— New  1x8  Pierce  Hand   Screw  Machines. 

2—2"     Cleveland      Automatic     Screw     Machines, 
jigger  feed. 
MILLING    MACHINES    AND    GRINDERS 

1— No.    2    Hendey    Plain   Milling   Machine. 

3— New    No.     1^    American    Plain    Milling    Ma- 
chines. 

1— No.    1314   Garvin  Plain  MiUing  Machme 

1— No.    0    Brown    &    Sharpe    Plain    Willing    Ma- 
chine. 

1— No.   1   Cincinnati  Plain    Milling   Machine. 

2-No.    13    Pratt   &   Whitney   Lincoln   Type   .Mill- 
ing   Machines. 

5— No.    W4   Knight  Milling   &  Drilling  .Machines. 

3— Fox   Hand    Milling   Machines. 

1-Garvin    Hand    -Miller. 

4— No.    0  Burke  Bench  Millers   (new). 

1— No.    214    Bath    Universal    Grinder. 

1— No.   2  Wilmarth  &   -Merman  Surface  Grinder 

1— No.  3  Wilmarth  &  Merman  Surface  Grinder. 

1— .Mina    Valley    Universal    Cutter   Grinder. 

1— No.    170   Wells   Cutter   Grinder. 

DRILL    PRESSES 
1-3'   Mueller  Plain   Radial   Drill. 
1-6'    Mueller  Plain    Radial   Drill,   old   tvpe. 
1—20^   Baker   H.D.    Drill. 
5— aO"    Buffalo    Plain    Drill    Presaes. 
1— 3-spindle  8"    overhang  Henry  A    Wright   High 

Speed    Drill. 
4— 6-spindle    Fox   High   Speed   Drill   Preiees. 
2— l-spindle    Fox    High    Speed    Drill    PrCBSes. 
I— 16spindle    -Natco    Drill. 
3-12"     I,eland    &    GifTord     High     Speed     Benrfj 

Drills. 

.SHAPERS     .AND     PLANERS 
1-at"    Ohio    H.D..    B.G.    Crank    Shaper. 
1— 31"    Lodge   &   Davis    Geared    Shaper. 
1—18"    Hendey    Geared    Shaper. 
2— 10"  New  .Springfield   B.G.    Crank   Shapers. 
1— W  X  27  X  8'   Cmcinnati   Planer.   S.H. 
1—16   X    16    X    5'    Hendey   Planer,    S.H. 

PRESSES    ."lND    HAMMERS. 
I-Waterbury-Farrell   O.B.I.    Press,    geared. 
1— No.    in    Perkins    Drawing    Press. 
5— No.    2-W    Bliss    Wiring    Presses. 
1-Snn-lb.    B,    &    S.    Roll    Board    Hammer. 
]-.i(nO-lb.    P.    &    W.     Roll    Board    Hammer. 
1— .W-lh.     S'ranton    Belt    Ha«nmer. 
1— 25-lb.    Pradley   Helve  Hammer. 

AIR     OOMPRBS'IORS 
1—16  I  18  X  13    Union    Steam    Pump    Co..    steam 

driven    air    compressor. 
1-8x6    WesHnghouse    Steam    Air   Cqmpresso) 
1— in  X  10  Clayton   Belt    Dri 
1—8  X  8   Fairbanks--M 

Compressor. 
1—8  X  8    Gardner   Single   Belt    Driven    Air   Com- 

pres.sor. 
1—1!  X  8  Union  Steam  Pump  Co.  Belt  Dnven  -Air 

Compressor. 
1—714    X    6   Chicago    Pneumatic    Tool    Co.    Belt 

Driven    Air   Compressor. 

We  also  carry  a  larre  stock  of  Steam  En- 
gines, Steam  F^mpfl  and  Electrical  Equipment 
of    all    kinds. 

We  are  in  the  market  to  purchase  machines 
tools   both   large   and  small. 


RIVERSIDE  MACHINERY 
DEPOT 

17-29  St.   Aubin  Avenue 
DETROIT,  MICH. 


//   any   advertisement    interests   you,   tear   it    out   now   and   place   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


88 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII 


STEEL 

BUILDING 

CRANES 


CTEEL  Building  or  Coal 
»^  Shed,  108  ft.  by  298  ft., 
maximum  height  40  ft.,  con- 
taining approximately  450 
tons   of   structural  steel. 

Two  Brown  Patent  Bridge 
Tramways,  hoisting  and 
conveying  apparatuses  con- 
sisting of  a  bridge  tramway 
with  tracks  permitting  a 
movement  of  300  ft.,  dis- 
tance   between    movable 

piers  i8o  ft.,  with  end  cantilevers  92 
ft.  and  36  ft.  Each  bridge  has  in  its 
house,  Brown  Patent  Hoisting  En- 
gine with  the  most  modern  operat- 
ing mechanism,  together  with  all 
necessary  fittings  and  connections 
for  complete  operation,  together 
with  six  Brown  Patent  Automatic 
Self-Dumping  Coal  Tubs  of  42  cu. 
ft.  capacity ;  two  single  rope  buckets 
of  48  cu.  ft.  capacity;  four  skips  of 
2  ton  capacity;  and  also  automatic 
clam  shell  bucket.  Both  these  out- 
fits are  practically  in  new  condition. 

New    York    Machinery 
Exchange,  Inc. 

50  Church  Street    .  '  .    New  York  City 


List  of  Machinery  in 
Stock  for  Sale 

PRESSES 

■:&-So.    ISO   Brown    &    Boggs,    Dial   Feed. 

Without   Dial   Feed. 
6— Xo.   190  Brown  &   Boggs,   wiOi  Dial   Feed. 
3— No.    1   Toledo,    with    Dial    Feed. 
2— No.   01    V.    &    O.    Presses   with   Roll   Feed. 
1— No.    18   Perkins   Press.    Plain. 
2— No.    33.0    McDonald    Double    Acting    Can    Press    with    Magnet    Stock 

Lifter  and   Auto.    Feed. 
1— No.   216B   Niagara  Tool    Works  Co.    Slitting   Machine. 

FOR  60-PDR.  SHELLS 

2— Holden   &   Moi-gan   Thread   Milk-rs  for  base  end. 

1— Bertram    Duplex    Thread    Miller   for   nose    end. 

1— Bertram   Copper    Band    Latlie. 

1— Perrin    Band    Press   with    Pump. 

1— Base    Plug  TwLster    (home   made). 

1— Roll    Riveter    (home    made). 

1—6"   Shell   Vise   (home  made). 

1—5"    Marking   Head    (home   made). 

1—5"  Hand  Tapping  Vise    home  made). 

l_(Waterous   Special    Rough   Turning   and   Cutting-oCf  Lathe. 

1— Jenckes  Band  Turner. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

4— Errington   Collapsible   Taps,    2". 

Chaoers  for  above. 
1— IH"   Automatic    Hartfgrd  Screw  iMachine;   in   first-class  condition. 
l^Noble    &    Westbrooke    Marking    Machine,    only    used    to   mark   2O0.00n 

gaines:  good   as  new. 
1— P.    &    W.    %"    Screw   Machine. 


FOR  6     SHELLS 

.'— 300-lb.  Beaudry  Champion  Hammers. 
1 — Sots  6"  Shell  Nosing  Dies  for  above. 
-De  Vilbiss   Vami.'^h  Sprayers     1  quart  size). 


nsboro   Turret.    24". 


All  the  above  are  in  good  condition 

McKmnon  Dash  Company 

St.  Catharines,  Ont. 


SURPLUS 

MACHINERY 

FOR  SALE 

■J — '■-'>"  Ilall  i-iil-olf  machines 

1— Lodge  i-  Shipley  Turret  Lathe,  22"  x  10' 

1— Lodge  &  Shipley  Turret  Lathe,  24"  x  10' 

2— Libby  Turret  Lathes,  18" 

1— fJLsholt  Turret  Lathe,  18" 

2— Gisholt  Turret  Lathes,  21" 

1 — Gardner  Shell  Base  Grinder,  4A 

l_Ford-Smith  Grinder,  20" 

2 — Laudis  Traverse  Grinders,  No.  4  and  12  x  66 

1 — Symington  Band  Turn  Lathe,  3" 

1 — 3"  Stamping  Machine 

2 — Tate-Jones  Shell  Furnaces 

1_16'  Rushwarth  Plate  Planer 

1 — 16'  Bertram  Plate  Planer 

1 — Coping  Machine 

Poison  Iron  Works,  Ltd. 

TORONTO,  ONTARIO 


//  ivhat  you  need  is  not  advertised,   consult   our   Buyers'   Directory   and   write   advertisers   listed   tinder   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


ACHINE  TOOLS 

Tested  Under  Belt  for  Operation  and  Accuracy  and  Guaranteed 


OUR  GUARANTEE 

Your  money  back  if  you  re- 
turn a  machine  within  30 
days  from  date  of  ship- 
ment, freight  prepaid. 

NO  EXCUSES  NECESSARY. 


nf  2i"   Gisholts  which  have  been   Re-manufactured 
operation.     They  are  tested  both  for  operation  and 

ENGINE  LATHES— Latest  Models. 

24—22'  X  8    Hamilton,  D.B.G.,  C.R.,  Semi-Q.C. 

5 — 22"  X    8'  Hamilton,  D.B.G.,  Turret  tool  post, 

4 — 22"  X    8'  Davenport,  D.B.G.,  Turret  tool  post, 

7—22"  X  10'  Hamilton,  D.B.G.,  C.R.,  Semi-Q.C.G., 

2—22"  X  10'  Hamilton,  D.  B.  G.,  turret  tool  post,  Semi-Q.C.G., 
20—22"  X  10'  Davis,  D.B.G.,  C.R.,  Q.C.G., 

6—24"  X  10'  Lodse  &  Shipley,  D.B.G.,  C.R.,  Q.C.G., 

8—24"  X  10'  Lodae  &  Shipley,  Selective  Gd.  Hd.,  C.R.,  Q.C.G., 
11—26'  X  10'  American,  D.B.G.,  C.R.,  and  carriage  turret,  Q.C.G., 

2 — 26"  X  10'  American,  D.B.G.,  Carriage  turret, 
19 — 26"  X  12'  Putnam,  carriage  turret.  semi-Q.C. 

9—26"  X  12'  Putnam,  C.R.,  Semi-Q.C, 

2—26"  X  12'  Wickes,  D.B.G.,  C.R.,  Semi-Q.C.G., 
10—28"  X  10'  Niles,  Bement,  Pond,  D.B.G.,  Q.C.G. 

4 — 28"  X  14'  Lodge  &  Shipley,  Select.  Gd.  Hd.,  motor  drive,  C.R.,  turret  and  taper. 

3—30"  X  16'  Lodge  &  Shipley,  D.B.G.,  C.R.,  tui-ret  and  taper, 
10-40"  X  18"  Pittsburgh,  triple  geared,  Q.C.G., 

TURRET  MACHINES— Latest  Models. 

18—21"  Gisholts.  SW  hole,  2-stcp.  5"  be!t.  37—24"  Gisholts.  6"  hole  for  motor. 

2.5—21"  Gi.sholts,   3y."  hole,  for  motor.  Z—2V,"  x  2G"  Greenlee  Flat  Turrets. 

13—24"  Gisholts.  4H"  hole.   3-step.  4"  belt.  2— 2'i."x26"   Pratt  &   Whitney   Gd.   Hd.  Turrets. 

38—24"  Gisholts.   6"  hole.   2-step.   6"  belt.  4  -  3-A  Warner  &  Swasey   (bar  machines). 


RADIAL    DRILLS 


-.3'    Mueller. 
—3 1.'.'    Gang. 
—  4'    Niles    Full    Univ. 
3— 5'    Niles    Semi-Univ. 

MULTIPLE  DRILLS. 

1— 8-spindle  Valley   City.  t 

1 — 12-spindle  Baush. 
1— 24-spindle   P.    &   W. 

SHAPERS 
1 — 15"    Hendey    Friction    Shaper. 
1 — 16"    Perl-ins    T  riction    Shaper. 
2—16"   Barker   Plain   Crank. 
1—24"  Gould  &  Eberhardt  Back  Geared  Crank. 
1—24"    Queen    City    Back    Geared    Crank. 
1—48"    Morton    Draw    Cut. 

PLANERS 
1—22"  X  22"  X  5'    Flather. 
1—22"  X  22"  X  6'   American. 
1—24"  X  24"  X   4'    Gray. 
2—24"  X  24"  X  B'   Gray. 
1—24"  X  24"  X  6'    Cincinnati. 
1—24''  X  24"  X  10'    Lodge   &   Davis. 
1 — 26"  X  26"  X  6'    American. 
1—26"  X  26"  X  7;    Gray. 
1—26"  X  26"  X  T    Gray.    1    head. 
1—30"  X  30"  X  7'    Powell.    4    heads. 
1—32"  X  32"  X  8'    Gray.    2    heads. 
-1—32"  X  32"  X  10'    Gray,    2   heads. 
1—48"  X  48"  X   16'     Pond.    2    heads. 

MILLING    MACHINES 
£— Nc.   ;>   Brainard. 
1-No.   3   Brainard   Plain. 
'—No.  20   Oesterlein  Universal. 
1— No.    ly.    Brown    &    Sharpe  Universal. 
1— No.    25    Becker   Plain. 
1 — No.   2   Cincinnati   Universal. 
1 — No.    5    Schuchardt   &    Schutte    Plain. 
1— No.   3    Hendey    Plain. 
4— No.    2    Pratt    &    Whitney    Lincoln. 
1—60"  X  48"  X  8'    Ingersoll   Slab. 
1 — Beaman  &  Smith.  2  vert.  hds..  1  hor.  cross 


1— No 


bor.    hd. 


nbination   Hor 


HILL,  CLARKE  &  CO.  OF  CHICAGO 

625  WASHINGTON  BLVD.,  CHICAGO,  ILL. 


//   any   advertisement  interests  you,   tear  it    out   non:   and   place    with    letter/!  to  be  aiswered. 


90 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII 


IMMED 

DRILLING    MACHINES 

lATE  DE 

LATHES 

13"  X     5'   P.   &  W..  c.r..  taper. 

1 

JVERY 

16"    Lodge    &    Shipley. 
25'    Niles. 

l.e 

md    U.S..    U.B..    bench    type. 

2  X  24"    Jones    &    Lamson. 

I'/j   KniKht  Driller  anJ   Miller. 

16"  X     6'   Prentice,    c.r. 

3  X  86"    Jones     &     Lamson,     chucking     equip- 

32" 

Hamilton.   B.h..   b.K..   P.f. 

18"  X     8'   L.    &    S.   pat.   head,    c.r.    taper. 

mcnt. 

18"  X  10'   KitchburK.   c.r. 

3  X  36"   Jones    &    Lamson,   bar   equipment. 

20" 

W.   I'.   &  J.   Biirnes,   4  spindle. 

18"  X   12'   Barker,    c.r. 

21"   Gisholt.   with  taper. 

No 

11    P.    &    W.    Multiple,    10  spindles. 

20"  X  14'   Blaisdall.   c.r. 

2     24"  Giaholt  turret  lathes,  taper  attachment. 

3' 

W.    K.   r.anif    rinin   Kndinl. 

21"  X  12'  New   Haven,   c.r. 

3Vi 

Mu.ller    Plain    Radial. 

24"  X  13'  New  Haven,   c.r. 
3«"  X  20'   American,    t.b.g. 

PUNCHES    AND    SHEARS 

vlin^:   &   Harniachreiter  Horizontal  Driller. 

36"  X  22'   New    Haven,    t.b.K. 

No.    3    Americ.in    Can. 

GEAR    CUTTERS 

PLANERS 

24"  X  24"  X  4'  Gray,  one  head. 

No.  3  Bauroth,  O.B.I. 

No.   6   Bauroth   Geared.   O.B.I. 

No.  6  N.  American  Can. 

lU-j 

nolds    Hobber. 

24"  X  24"  X  8'   Cincinnati,  one  head. 

26"  X  26"  X  8'   Pease,  one  head. 

30" 

24" 
No 
31'," 

X   !l"   G.   &   E.  auto,   tor  spur  and  bevel. 
X   7"   G.    &    E.   for  spur. 
3-  26"   n.   &  S.  for  spur. 
Walcott    for    spur. 

GRINDERS 

30"  X  30"  X  8'   Woodward  &  Powell,  one  h 
30"  X  30"  X  8'   Cincinnati,  two  heads. 
36"  X  36"  X   14'  Sellers,  one  head. 
40"  X  38"  X   14'   Putnam,  one  head. 
50"  X  50"  X  18'  New    Haven,    two    heads, 
extension   heads. 

L-ad. 
two 

No.  5  L.  &  A.  Double  Punch  &  Shear,  %"x%". 

3"x%",    1%   rd.    (new). 
No.    1   L.  &  A.   Multiple  Punch    (new). 
No.    1    L.    &    A.    Horizontal    Punch,    V:"    in    1" 

(new). 

SCREW    MACHINES 

MISCELLANEOUS 

No 

1-V4    Cincinnati   Cutter  and   Tool. 

No.   1   Foster,   Plain.   A.C.   and   W.K. 

No 

2  Woods  Universal  Cutter  and  Tool. 

No.    0    Mitts    &    Merrill    Keyscater. 

No 

28  B.   &  S.  Gear  Cutter. 

16"    P.    &    W.    Plain. 

60-lb.     Bradley    Strap    Hammer. 

No 

No.    2    Costcllo.    plain    head. 

%"    Acme    Korging    Machine. 

H" 

X   20"   U.   &  S.   Plain. 

Mo.    2    P.    &    W.    friction   head. 

52"    Nilea    car    wheel    boring    mill. 

Onr 

No.   4    Pearson,   geared   head. 

8"   Stover   Pipe  Machine. 

Gia 

No.   3    Hardons    &   Oliver,   plain   head. 

6"  X    11"    P.    &    W.    Thread    Miller. 

No 

r>   Diamond   water  tt)ol. 

',;h"    Cleveland,    automatic. 

No.    1    American    Air  Tempering    Kurnacc. 

No 

IG    Gardner    disc    Rrindor. 

TURRET     LATHES 

H.lt    Lacing    Machine. 

No 

21    Gardner    disc    irrindcr. 

No.    22    Garvin. 

3-t(in    Yale    Duplex    Hoist. 

Stocker-Rumely-Wachs    Company, 

117-121  N.  Jefferson  St., 

CHICAGO.   ILL. 

We  Have  for  Immediate  Delivery 
the  Following  Second-hand 
Machinery  in  Good  Oper- 
ative Condition 

1  Jjuiidis  No.  ;}  Universal  Grinder 
12"  x  42",  complete  equipment,  less 
internal  grinding  attachment.  .$1,500 

I  (lisholt  Turret  Lathe,  21",  complete 
with  boring  bar  equipmeijt  and  coun- 
tershaft  $2,200 

1  (lisholt  Turret  Tiathe,  21",  com])let(' 
with  l)()i'ing  bar  equiimient  and  coun- 
tershaft   $1,800 

These  macihines  are  ])articularly  good 
value,  and  may  be  seen  at  our  works. 

A.  B.  JARDINE  &  COMPANY 

HESPELER,     ONT. 


MACHINE   TOOLS 
IN  STOCK 


ilh   Vertical  Attjichn 


tit  and 


No.  4  Cincinnati  Universal  Mille 

Power  Feed  Rotary  Table. 
No.  3  I.elilond  Universal  Miller. 

No.    3    Kenipsmith    Plain   Miller  with   Index    Heads   and    Vertical 
Attachment. 

4  No.  li/i  NEW  American  Plain  Millers. 

5  Nc.  0  NEW  Steptoe  Hand  Millers. 

24"   X    10'    NEW    Carroll-Jamieson    Heavy    Duty    Lathe. 
6—1!)"    X    8'    NEW    Sidney.    D.H.G..    quick    change,    swing    21" 

over  Vs. 
3-17"    X    8'    NEW    Sidney.    D.H.G..    iiuick    change,    swing    19" 


Vs. 


1      l.'i" 


6'    NEW    Sidney,    D.B.G..    uuick    change. 


'ing    17" 


12  -IV"  X   8'    NEW   National,   quick   change. 

1-15"    X    6'    NEW    Carroll-Jamieson.    quick    change. 
48"   Harrington    Plain   Radial   Drill. 
30"  Drescs  Plain  Radial  Drill. 
D-4  Colburn  High   Duty  Drills. 

3—20"   Rockford   High   Duty  Drills. 

1—28"  NEW   Superior  Sliding   Head  Drill. 

2 — 25"  NEW  Superior  Drills,  with  tapping  attachment. 
16"  Queen  City  B.G.  Shaper. 
20"  Cincinnati  D.G.   Shaper. 
21"  NEV.'  Steptoe  B.G.  Shaper. 
2  1"    Klather   D.G.   Shaper. 

FRANK  TOOMEY,  INC. 

127-131  North  Third  St.,       PHILADELPHIA,  PA.,  U.S.A. 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,   consult  our  Buyers'  Directory  and  write  advertisers   listed  under  proper  heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    M  A  C  H I N  E  R  Y 


L-OO  K  — 

BOKIXG    AlND    TCRN'I>rG    MACIIINEa- 
VERTICAL. 
1-30"   nullard.  1   tiirnt  head. 
1—30"   Flather,  one  turret  head. 
1—36"  Bausch,  2  swivel  heads. 
■2—36"    Brown    &    Sharpe,    one    turret    head;    Dm. 

deliver!'. 
1 — 12"   N.B.P..   two  prwivel  heads,   motor  diive. 
1— Xew  42"  Gisholt,  2  heads. 
1— M"  Colbum,  two  iinivel  heads. 
1—72"    Nile.'*,    two    swivel    heads. 
1~72"    Bickford.    two   swivel   heads. 
1—80"  Niles.  two  swivel  heads,  slotting  attachment. 
1-W"    Sellers,    one   head. 
l-rr  Verlicnl  Cylinder. 
1— New   8'    Bickford :    December   delivery. 
1»'   NMles.   2  heads;   December  delivery. 

BORI.Vrj     .\I.\CHIXES-H0UIZON'TAL. 

1— Lucas.    2^"   bar. 

1— No.    1   Barrett    Cylinder  Borer.   3%"  bar   type. 

1— .Jewburph  4"  bar.  M"  swing.  72"  feed. 

1— No.  2  20"  Barrett,  2  facing  heads. 

1-Now   N( 

White). 

1— No.    7   Hieh^ipeed    Ai.ix.    M"   stroke. 
1— No.    3  Williams  &  White,   belt  drive. 
2-J\o.  23  Williams  &   White,  belt  drive. 
1-No.   36   Williams  &   White,   belt   drive. 

CCmPRBJSSORS— AIR. 
1— IngersoIl-Sai-gent   Duple.x.   8  x   14>4  x  8". 
I— Cincinnati  Cross  Compound,   two-stage.  790  o.l.  ft. 
1-10"    X    12"    Chicago    Pnoumatic.    belt-driven. 
1— 10"    I    10"    I    10"    Single    Cylinder    Smith-Valle. 

steam  driven. 
1—22"  X  13"   X   16"   Ingersoll-Rand.    motor  driven. 

CRANES. 
2— 10-ton  Electric.  47'  span. 
1— 50-ton   Nile,  SI'   span. 
1— Locomotive,    35'    boom,    standard    gaged,    ateam 

CUTTING^PP  MACHINES. 
2— No.   on   Brown   &   anarpe. 

t-S>f"    ITnll. 
l(V_tK,"    wniLinis. 

3^1"    CnrM,   A-    CurtLs. 

IiRILLlXG     MACHINES— RADIAL. 

C-X.w    y    Ameritan,    cone   drive. 

1    .T    Rickford.    semi-Universal    table. 

1-  .'■'    ItickfoH.   gear  drive. 

3— New   3'   .imerioans.   sensitive   tapping  attach. 

l~New    3'    Mueller,    plain    .speed,    box    drive. 

1— New   i'i'    Western    Drill.    86"   circle. 

2—4'^    .Mueller,    plain,    speed    box   drive. 

1— S'   semi-universal   American. 

1—614'    American    full    Universal. 

1-6'    B.iush    Plain,    cone   driver. 
New  6'    Triumph,    motor  drive;   September  delivery. 

ORII/LIVG    MAOHTNBS— HEAVY    DUTY 
4— No.   310   Baker  Brothers. 
2-New  No.   2  Colbum. 
3-Xo.    14   Colbum.   24"   swing,    capacity   2"    in    solid 

steel. 
2-D3  Colbum.   plain   table. 
4— No.    310   Baker,    single   pulley  drive,    late    type. 

DRILLING    MAOHINBS-MULTIPLE    SPINDLE. 
4— New    Leland-Gifford.    sensitive,    four   spindle. 
1— No.    SIC    Baush,    12  spindle,    capacity    IH"   holes. 

30"  circle. 
1— 14-.spindle    Baush.    capacity   1"    holes,    36"    circle. 

GEAR-CUTTLN'G   MACHINES. 
1— No.    I    Whiton. 
1— -No.  3  Barber-Colman  Hobber. 
1— No.    3    Bickett    Gear    Back    Planer,    delivery    60 

days, 
1-No.    3    Brown    &    Sharps    Auto.    Gear    Cutter. 

Spur. 
l—New   6"    Standard    Gear  Cutt«r,    Spur. 
1— U"   Gleason    Bevel   Gear   Planer. 
1—16"   (Jleason   Bevel    Gear  Planer. 
1—16"   Bilgram  Bevel  Gear  Generator. 
1— 2»"   Grant-Lee    Gear    Hotiber. 

1— No.    1    20"    Schuchardt    &    Schutte    Gear    Hobber 
\—tl  X  8   G.    &    E.    Spur  and   Bevel   Cutter. 
1-24"  Fellowa  Gear  Shaper. 
1-24   X   8"   G.    &    E.    for  Spur  and    Bevel. 
1—24"   Becker  Brainard. 
1    New    Flather,   solid   patttni.   30"   AulomaHc   Gear 

Cutler. 
I— New   No.    10  Whiton.    Bevel  32",    Spur  34". 
3-36"    Fellows   Gear   Hhapers. 
GRINDERS-UNIVERSAL    FOR    CUTTERS. 
DRILLS.   REA.MERS,    ETC. 
1-No     1    Cincinnati. 
1— New    Norton    No.    1. 
1-New    Walker   No.    1.    outflt  B. 
1— .New  Walker  No.   2,  outfit  K   (capacity  9"  x  2C"1. 
1-New    Wilmarth   &    Morman,   style   B.K. 
«-No.    100    Wells. 
1-Gisholt   No.   5,  12". 

GRINDING    MAOHINES-CYLINDRlCAr.,-- 

PLAIN. 

1-Ncw  No.   12  Brown   &   Sharpe,   8"  x  26",   Sept. 

delivery. 


RE     THEY     AR 


1— New  10  X  36"   Landis;   immediate. 
Ir-New    10"    X    30"    Norton,    Sept.    deliveij. 
1— New  10"  X  60"  Norton,  Sept.  delivery. 
1— lu"   X   60"    Landis. 
1— New   10   X   72   Norton,    Plain. 
20—12"    X  24"   Modem,    self-contained. 
1—12"   X  32"    Landis,    rebuilt. 
6—12"  X  36"  Modem,   self-contained,   motor  or  belt 

2 — 12    X    42"    Landis,    self-contained. 
6 — 12"   X  48"   Modem,   self-contained,   motor  driven. 
1— Ifi"   X   6C"    Landis.    with   crank   grinding. 
1—18"   X   90"   Brown  &   Sharpe. 

GRINDING    MAOIIIXES-CYLINDRICAI^ 

UNIVERSAL. 
1— Brown    &   Sharpe   No.    13.    8"   x   24". 
1-New   No.   2  Bath.  9"   x  20". 
1-No.    2   New    Walker,    9"   x    26". 
1— No.    IH    (10"   X   30")    Landis. 
l—New    No.    2%    (10"    X  30")    Bath. 
1-10"   X  42"   Modem. 
»-New    No.    2    Morse,    cap.    12"    x    30".    Universal. 

Nov.    delivery. 
1— No.   3  (15"  X  40")   Brown  &  Sharpe. 
1-1""    X   42"   Landis. 
2— New  No.   3  .Modem.   13"  x  40".   Sept.   delivery. 

GRINDERS-INTERNAL. 
1— Xo.    H4   Landis. 
1— No.   70  Heald. 
1— No.    75    Heald. 

GRINDERS— CYLIXDER. 
1— No.    27   Brown    &    Sharpe. 
1— No.    60   Heald,    single   pulley   drive. 

GRINOBRS— PROFILE. 
1— New    Cleveland. 

GRINDERS-RING. 
1— New  No.   14.  Beasley,   two-ring  chucks. 
1-No.    200   Heald, 
1— No.    210   Heald. 

GRIXDERS^SURFACE, 
1— .New   No.    1  Wilmarth   &   .Morman. 
1— No.  1   Diamond,  capacity  1'2"  x  12"  i  24",  auto- 
matic. 
2— New  No.  1^  Walker's,  complete. 
4-^New    Xo.    2    Reid    (same   as   B,   &   S.). 
1— New   No.   2   Bromi   iShai-pe. 

HAMMERS— POWER-FORGING. 
1— 10-lb.    Bradley   Helve. 
1— 150-lb.    Bradley   Helve,    upright. 

HA'.M.MEBS-BOABD  LIFT— DROP. 
l^MO-lb.   Billings  &  Spencer. 
1— 2,00O-lb.   Chambersburg. 

HA  M  \i  i;i;-;   ^  i'i;a  .\1-F0RGING. 
1— Used    6/>i  II.      \i.       ~:',;..    Frame. 
l-05Mb.    l;.ii    -'I  .     I    .HLu    Hammer, 
1-18"   .MciKi"    .^    Willi  i:t;-,   iW  to  SCO  IIk..  21"  cal). 
1— New  2.U00  lbs.    .Moigau   Single   Frame. 
1—3,000  lbs.  Morgan  Double  Frame. 

KEYSEATBBS. 

2— No.  0  .Mitts  &  Merrill. 
1-Xo.  2  .Mitts  &  MeiTill. 
1 — 60"    stroke    Comiiton    Knowles    Broacher. 


2— New  No.  3  Harding  Brothels  Bench  Lathe. 
14— Reed-Prentice    Shell    Lathes,    for    4"    or    18    lbs. 

American  shells. 
70— New   Simplex,    16"    x   8'. 
13— No.    3X    Reed-Prentice,    semi-aut'jmatic. 
40-14"  X  6'   Reed  Stnd  and  Bolt. 

5—16"    X    8'     Fairbanks-.Morse.    heavy    duty. 
14—16    X    8    Simplex.    Single    Pulley    Drive. 
22—18"    X   8'    Battle   Creek,    heavy   duty. 

5-20"   X   8'    Merschon. 
50—20"   X   10'    Hindman,   high  duty, 

LATHES— ENGINE. 

1—8"  Wade  Precision;  September  deliveiT. 
1—14"  X  6'  BradfoiTl.  taper  attachment. 
1— New     Hauling     Brothera    15"     Precision     Lathe, 

quick-change  gear,   page  35,    third  catalogue. 
}— New  16"  X  6'  Cleveland  Tool  Boom  Lathes,  com- 

ple.e    equipment. 
2— IC"  X   6'    LeBlond.  pan  bed,  quick-change  geaiB, 

taper  attachment. 
1— New    IT"    X   8'    Xational,   quick-change   gears. 
1—18"    X   8'    Lodge   &    Shipley,   geared   head,   taper. 
3—18"    X   9'    Cham. 

1—18    X    10    Ilendey.    quick  change   gear,    14"   chuck. 
1— New   19"    X   8'    LeBlond,    heavy   duty. 
22— '31"    X   8'    Lodge   &    Shipley,   quick-change   gear. 
7— New   20"    X   8'    American,    heavv    Juty. 
1— Xew  2y  X  10'   Cleveland,  geared  head. 
25— Xew   21"    X  10'    Porter,   single   back  geared, 
5— New    22    X    10'    Monarch,    double    back    geared. 

Q  CO. 
9—22"  X   10'    Putnam,  oil  pan  turrets. 
3-2("  X  10'   Reed. 
2—24"   X    12'    S.    &    B. 
4— M"  X   14'    American,   quick-change. 


1—26"    X    M'    New    Haven. 

4—27"  X  14'   Patent  Head  Lodge  &  Shipley,  doaible 

bnek   geared. 
1—28"  X   18'    New   Haven,   single  back  geared. 
1—28"  X  18'   Schumacher  &   Boye. 
1— Xew  30"  X  14'    American.   Do\ibk    Back  Geared. 

Quick   Change. 
3— Xew   Si"   X    12'    Pittsburg   pattern. 
8— Xew   36"    X   24'    Putnam,    triple    geared. 
1— .'"8   X    19'    Steptoe.   single   back   gear. 
1—50"  X  12'   American.   Gear  Head.  Quick  Change. 
1—71"    X   20'    Fifield.    triple  geared. 

LATHES— TURRiET. 

1—3"  X  36"  Jones  &  Lamson,  geared  sliding  hca-'. 
.■;— 2   X  24  Jones  &   Lamson. 
18— OA   1'otter  &  .Tnhnson. 
1-Vow   n-   Gisholt 
l-\.w   24"    Gi.sholt. 
1  -M"  Sibley. 


1— No.  2  Kempsmith.   13",  dividing  head. 
1— No.    2    Kempsmith,    vertical    attachment. 
1— New  Kempsmith. 
1 — Xo.   2   Kempsmith.   hack   geared. 
2— No.   3  Cincinnati,  late  model;  almost  new. 
1— Now  No.   3   Kempsmith. 
2— New  No.  3  Becker.   August  delivery. 
I  1— 'New    No.    4    LeBlond.   heavy   duty;   immediate. 


1— No.  0  Pratt  ,Si  Whitney. 

1— iNew    No.    1    Brown    &    Sharpe. 

2— New   No.    1    Kempsmith. 

2— New   No.  114   American,  back  gear. 

1— New    No.    2   Rockford. 

2— New   No.    3   Kempsmith. 

1-No.    3   LeBlond. 

1-^No.    3   Cincinnati. 

l_No.    4    Garvin. 

l-I'sed    No.   4   Blown   &   .Sh.irpe. 

.MILLING    MA.OH1NBS-VBRT10AL. 

1— New  Bickett,  No.  0. 
4 — New  No.  -IB  Becker. 
2— No.   5  Becker. 

MIIXrXG    IIAOHIINBS— PLANBIR    TYPE. 

1— No.  2  Beaman  &  Smith,  vertical  apindle,  open 
side. 

2— Ingersoll  Slab  Millers,  working  surface  of  table 
60"   X  20". 

1— No.  4  Beaman  &  Smith,  vertical  spindle,  open 
side,  working  surface  of  table  120"  x  24",  remov- 
able housing   on   one   side. 


21" 


nihs 


rail. 


1— !K"  X  26"  X  8'  Gray,  one  head  on  cross 
1—30"  X  30"  X  8'  Gale  Planer,  one  head. 
1—30"  X  30"  X  12'  Cincinnati,  two  heads. 
1— ,16"  X  30"  X  12'  New  Hsvon.  one  head. 
New   36"   X   36"   X   12'    Bickett.    one   head;   January 

del. ;  additional  heads  if  desired. 
2— New  36"   X   36"   x   12'    Woodward   &    Powell,    two 

heads  on   cross  rail,  one  side  bead ;  Oct.   delivery. 
1—36"   X  36"  X   12'    Gray,    two  heads. 
1— .'W"  X  36"  X  14'  Sellers,    four   heads. 
T-^iO"    X    40"    X    11'    Xiles,    four   heads. 
1_rir»v.  42".  widen~l   tn  vr  x  4?"  x  16.   two  heads. 
New   48"    X    42"    x    16'    Bickett.    one    head;    January 

delivery:   additional   heaih!   if  desired. 
1_1!1»   X   48"   X   16'    Sellers,    orte   rail   head,   two  side 

heads. 
1_5i"    X   1''    Powr'l.    one   head. 
1— S'"    X    52"    X    10'    Belts,    two   heads,    right    angle 

drive. 
I— R4"  X  42"  X  16'    Woodward-Powell.  2  heads. 
l_a;"  X  42"  X  16'    Graves,   two  heads. 
1— .•>2'    6   Niles   Plate   Planer. 

SCREW    MAOHINES-AUTOMATIC. 

3— No,  51  National  Acme. 

1— Vo.  F15  Xational   Acme. 

2— Vo.  a:    National    Acme. 

2— .No.  53    Xational    Acme. 


1— New   16"   Springfield. 
1-16"    Motor-driven    Rockford. 
■>  -New   24"    .Mllw>"kee. 
1— New    Barker,    21". 
1—30"   Walcott.   gear  drive. 


W.  F.  DAVIS  MACHINE  TOOL  COMPANY 


CHICAGO.  ILL. 
549  Washington  Blvd. 


CLEVELAND,  OHIO 

508  Leader  News  BIdg. 


CINCINNATI,  OHIO 
1018  Union  Central   Life  BIdg. 

WRITE  OR  WIRE  OUR  NEAREST  OFFICE  FOR  QUOTATIONS 
THIS  IS  ONLY  A  PARTIAL  LIST  OF  AVAILABLE  MACHINES 


NEW  YORK  CITY 
Singer  Bldg. 


//    nny    iidvcrtiarminit    intcri'xis 


it    vut    now    and   place    with   U'ttt-rs  to  he 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


MACLEAN'S  SEPTEMBER 


is  a  magazine  of  the  very  best  type  and  rank.  It  is  made  for 
Canadians,  and  so  has  a  value  and  appeal  to  Canadians  possessed 
by  no  other  magazine  in  the  world.  MACLEAN'S  circulation 
is  getting  greater  each  month.  It  is  now  50%  larger  than  a 
year  ago.     The  inference  is  inevitable. 


Northcliffe 

Lord  Northcliffe  will  be  a  contribu- 
tor to  the  September  MACLEAN'S. 
The  general  theme  of  his  article 
will  be  Canada's  position  at  the 
present  time  in  relation  to  the  war 
and  to  the  Empire  afterwards.  Be 
sure  to  read  what  the  brilliant  and 
dominant  man  has  to  say  about  our 
country.  Get  an  outsider's  view- 
point. 


MacLean 


John  Bayne  MacLean,  publisher,  editor, 
publicist,  clear-seeing  and  far-seeing, 
has  another  strong  article  in  the  Septem- 
ber MACLEAN'S.  Colonel  MacLean  has 
proved  himself  to  be  as  clear-sighted  as 
Kitchener  in  many  matters  pertaining  to 
the  present  war;  and  he  is  doing  a  needed 
work  now  in  THE  FINANCIAL  POST 
and  other  newspapers,  to  arouse  Cana- 
dians to  a  proper  sense  of  the  perils  that 
lie  ahead. 


Ronald 


Another  smuggling  revelation! 

A  certain  Canadian  town  offered  a  big 
bonus  to  a  factory.  An  American  sup- 
plied the  desired  factory,  smuggled  into 
Canada  the  whole  plant  required, — and 
was  afterwards  found  out  and  brought 
to  book.  J.  D.  Ronald  tells  the  whole 
amazing  story  in  the  September  MAC- 
LEAN'S. Mr.  Ronald  is  contributing  to 
MACLEAN'S  a  series  of  Canadian  "in- 
side" smuggling  stories — true  ones.  This 
is  great  stuff. 


Leacock  and  Laut 

Stephen  Leacock  and  Miss  Agnes  C.  Laut 
are  contributors  as  usual  to  the  Septem- 
ber MACLEAN'S.  Leacock's  humor  is 
bubbling,  sparkling  and  refreshing — like 
spring  water.  Miss  Laut  provides  an- 
other of  her  well-informed  vigorous,  and 
revealing  articles  on  a  phase  of  the  war 
in  relation  to  Canada  and  the  United 
States.  Miss  Laut  makes  us  think  and 
wonder! 

Jacobs  and 
McGrath 

W.  W.  Jacobs  contributes  one  of  his  in- 
imitable short  stories  to  the  September 
MACLEAN'S.  "Their  Wives  Went 
Along."  Harold  McGrath,  world  famous 
story-writer,  who  wrote  "The  Man  on  the 
Box,"  provides  a  complete  novelette.  It  is 
a  story  of  adventure  and  mystery. 

Allenson  and 
Moorhouse 

A.  C.  Allenson  contributes  a  short  story, 
"A  Flutter  in  Diamonds;"  and  Hopkins 
Moorhouse,  "Their  Tents  like  the  Arabs." 
These  two  men  are  Canadians — winning 
fame,  and  adding  lustre  to  Canada's 
record  for  producing  short  story  writers 
of  the  first-class. 


Hendryx 


James  B.  Hendryx's  serial,  "The  Gun 
Brand,"  continues  in  the  September 
MACLEAN'S.  A  great  story  of  the 
Canadian  Northwest.  The  Movie-makers 
are  filming  Hendryx's  work.  So  you  can 
be  sure  that  he's  writing  the  right  sort 
of  stuff. 


Women  and 
Their  Work 

This  is  the  title  of  a  new  department  in 
MACLEAN'S.     In  the   September   issue, 
this  department  will  contain: 
Reducing  my  household  cost. 
The  Care  of  the  Child— an  article  by  Dr. 
George  E.  Smith. 

A  sketch  of  Mrs.  W.  M.  Davidson,  a 
prominent  Western  woman,  engaged  with 
her  husband  in  editing  the  Calgary 
AJbertan. 

Cooking  the  Cheaper  Cuts, — an  article  on 
economy  in  the  kitchen. 
This  new  department  will  prove  of  first- 
class  interest  to  all  women. 

Review  of  Reviews 

One  of  the  best  liked  and  most  valuable 
features  of  MACLEAN'S  MAGAZINE 
is  its  Review  of  Reviews  Department 
where  the  best  and  most  significant  arti- 
cles appearing  in  current  literature  are 
condensed  for  the  busy  reader,  and  for 
the  one  who  wants  to  know  what  other 
magazines  are  printing.  Here  one  gets 
a  cross-section  of  the  world's  best 
thought. 


At  Ail 

Newsdealers 

15  cents 


■cptember  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


c 

Special  Machiner 

Y 

Ik 

Special  Machinery,  Jigs,  Fixtures,  Punches  and  Dies,  Small 
Tools,  Screw  Machine  Products,  Ganges,  Forgings,   Etc. 

t 

©©EnS^S^©^   ^^©SSS 

Homer  &  Wilson 

Stamping  &  Tool  Works 

WE     MAKE    THE    TOOLS 

AND 

PRODUCE  THE  STAMPINGS 

Let  us  quote  on  your  requirements. 


1-3-5  Lancaster  Street 
Hamilton,  Ontario 


Rawhide  —  Steel  —  Brass  —  Cast 
Iron 

Try  our  W-G  Rawhide  Silent 
Gear.  Designers  and  Builders 
of  Special  Machiner>'. 

Winnipeg'Gear&Engineering'Co. 

197-199  Princess  St.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 


'ACCURACY 

Send  us  your  rush 
orders  for  Screws 
and  Nuts.  We  ship 
from  a  stock  where 
"Accuracy"  is  all 
important. 

Prompt  service  and 
"GALT"  quality 
goods  only. 

Specialists  in  Gap 
and  Set  Screws. 

THE 

GALT  MACHINE  SCREW  CO., 

LIMITED 

GALT,  ONTARIO 

Eastern  Representatives  :   The  Canadian  B.  K.  Morton  Companr. 
Limited.  49  Common  St.,  Montreal.   Que. 


We  Make  GAUGES  and  TOOLS 

All  Work  Executed  Promptly  and  Guaranteed 

THE    MONARCH    BRASS    MFG. 

COMPANY,     LIMITED 

71  BROWNS  AVE.  -  -  TORONTO,  ONT. 


/;■   any   advertisement  interests   you,   tear  it   out    now   and  place   with  letters  to  be  aii^ivered. 


C  A  N  A  D I A  N    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


An  Interesting  Installation  of  Chapman  Double 
Ball  Bearing  Transmission 


Jllu?tratiiiu  show?  a  portion  of  the  installalidu  at 
the  new  Dominion  Steel  Pi-oduct.s  pUint  at  Hrant- 
foid,  Ontario,  where  the  entire  transmission  equip- 
ment— shafting,  hangers  and  hall  beai'ings — is 
Chapman  Double  Ball  Bearing  Transmission. 

This  plant  was  laid  down  for  special  war-time 
manufacturing,  but  the  entire  equipment  was  in- 
stalled with  a  view  to  ultimate  economical  and 
efficient  production  in  the  general  manufacturing 
field. 


That  this  was  an  important  factor  in  choosing 
Chapman  Double  Ball  Bearing  Transmis.sion 
gives  U.S  no  small  amount  of  satisfaction. 

That  Dominion  Steel  Products  should  instal 
Chapman  Transmission  because  they  were  con- 
vinced of  its  efficiency  is  one  reason  why  you,  too, 
should  investigate.    We  have  on  file  many  similar 

reasons. 


The  Chapman  Double  Ball  Bearing  Company,  Limited 

339-351   Sorauren  Ave.,  Toronto,  Ont. 
TRANSMISSION  BALL  BEARING  CO.,  Inc. 

1050  Military   Road,   Buffalo,   N.Y. 


If  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    coyisiilt   our   Buyers'   Directory   and    u-rite   advertisers    listed   tinder   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN     MACHINERY 


95 


Hydraulic  Pumps 


We  are  builders  of  High  Pressure  Pumps 
to  be  used  in  connection  with  accumu- 
lators and  presses  for  making  forgings 
of  all  kinds. 

Immediate  shipment  to  Canada  or  any 
part  of  the  world  of  pumps  and  motors. 

Blake  Pump  &  Condenser  Co. 

FITCHBURG.  MASS.  30  Church  Street,  NEW  YORK 

Catle  Address:  "Blakepump" 
Standard  Machinery  &  Supplies,  Ltd.,  260  St.  James  Street,  Montreal,  Canada 

Representatives  for  the  Province  of  Quebec. 


If   any    advertisement   interests   you,    tear    it    out    yiout    and   place    with  letters'  to  be  rnswered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIIl 


What  Type  Shall  I  Install? 

THE  particular  blower  to  meet  the  con- 
ditions in  your  own  foundry  can  be 
furnished  by  Sturtevant.  We  do  not 
make  just  one  type  of  blower  and  recom- 
mend it  for  any  or  all  conditions.  On 
the  other  hand,  we  have  a  complete  line 
which  comprises  various  types  of  High 
Pressure  Positive  Blowers  and  Centrifugal 
Steel  Pressure  Blowers.  For  this  reason 
we  can  make  recommendations  without 
prejudice. 

Why  not  dictate  a  letter  now  to  our  engi- 
neering department,  giving  details  of  your 
conditions. 


(TRADE   MARKI 

B.  F.   STURTEVANT  COMPANY 
of  Canada  Limited 

GALT.  ONTARIO 
Montreal.         Toronto.  Winnipeg.  Vancoui 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,   consult   our  Buyers'   Directory  and   write  advertisers   listed   under  proper  heading. 


September  6,  1917.  CANADIAN     MACHINERY 


Wherever  Wheels  are 
Turning  or  Machines  are 
Operating — 

THE  output  during  the  short  fall 
^£^        ,  and   winter   days  —  and  during 

the  night-shifts — depends  largely 
upon  proper  lighting. 

Twenty-four  hours  of  daylight  would  certainly 
increase  your  output,  consequently,  securing  a  clear, 
white  light,  one  most  closely  approximating  daylight — one  that  does  not 
cause  eye  strain  —  one  that  will  tend  to  develop  all-around  efficiency  — 
one  that  gives  greatest  candle  power  with  least  current  consumption  — 
the  life  of  which  is  insured — Such  is  the  light  you  want  in  your  plant. 


"The  Light  That  Gives  More  Light"— 

THE  LACO-NITRO  LAMP 

is  the  ONE   light   that    meets  ALL    these   requirements. 

We  ofTer  in  the  Laco-Nitro    Lamp  a  tungsten  filament  in  a  nitrogen 

gas  filled   bulb.  This  lamp    represents    the    highest    development  of   the 

tungsten    lamp.  The  tungsten  filament  in    the  nitrogen  filled  bulb  gives 

a  clearer,  whiter  light  and  greater  candle  power  per  watt  than  any  other 
type   lamp. 

Inquire  from    your   local    dealer. 
Stocks   available   at   Montreal,    Toronto,    Winnipeg,    Vancouver  Warehouses. 


THE  CANADIAN  LACO-PHILIPS  CO.,  Limited 

MONTREAL  TORONTO  WINNIPEG  VANCOUVER 


//   any   advertisemsnt   interests   you,    tear   H    out    now   and   place   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


Metals^ 

-4' 


Scrap  Iron,  Steel 
and  Metals 

No  undertaking  is  too 
large  for  us.  We  are  Scrap 
Metal  Specialists,  and  can 
co-operate  with  _you  in  the 
dismantling  o  f  railway 
equipment,  bridges, 
plants,  steamers,  mills 
and  will  take  your  rails 
and  machinery. 
Shell  Makers.  W  e  c  a  n 
take  care  of  all  your  scrap 
materials,  at  highest 
prices. 

Give  us  particulars  and 
we  will  relieve  you  of  all 
worry. 


Dominion  Iron  &  Wrecking  Co. 


Transportation  Bldg. 


General  Offic 


Quebec,  Que. 


LIMITED 

Montreal,  Quebec 


FUSE  HOLE  GAUGES 


Manufacturing  and  inspection  fuse  hole 
gauges  for  all  size  shells.  A  surplus 
stock  enables   us   to   ship  immediately. 

Windsor  Machine  &  Tool  Works 

Windsor,  Ontario 


7/  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    considt    our  Buyers^   Directory   and   write   advertisers    listed   under   proper   headin 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


BUY 
A 


UNION 


TOOL 
CHEST 


and  be  assured  of  a  place  for  every  tool. 
You  know  ininiediately  if  one  is  mis- 
placed or  borrowed.  Keeps  tools  clean, 
safe,  free  from  moisture. 

Plain  or  quartered  oak, 
or  leatherette  covered, 
correctly  designed, draw- 
ers  perfectly   fitted. 

Write  for  Catalog    and  Prices 

UNION  TOOL  CHEST  WORKS 

28    Railroad    Street,    Rochester,    N.  Y. 

Style  A 


The  comfortable  kind.     For  shell  work 
and  military  service 

The  Albex  Eye  Protector  (Style  Al),  is  widely  used 
by  munition  machinists  and  grinders  in  the  United 
States.  It  is  also  accepted  and  authorized  by  the 
United  States  War  Department  and  British  War 
Office  for  protecting  the  eyes  of  troops  from  dust, 
glare,  sun,  wind,  etc. 


Specifications:    Rustproof    metal    construction. 
detachable  elastic   headband   or   flexible   cable 
leather    sidepuards.    and    l^s-inch    (micoquille)    lenses 
tieuzal,  smoke,  or  clear.     Can  be  worn  over  other  gla: 
for  the  name  WILLSON  stamped  on   inside  of  bridge. 
$1.2.') :    per   dozen.    ?9.60.    including  strong   metal   cases 


idjustable   bridge. 

rlwws.    ventilated 

n   amber. 

Per  pair. 
Details 


T.  A.    WilUon    &  Company..  Inc..    23    Scott   Straet.    Toronto 

Factorir  and  Main  Officei.   Reading.  Pa..  U.S.A. 

Chicago  San  Francisco  London 

Mailers  Building  Head  Building  9  Hatton  Cardan 


Venus 

lO*  PENCIL 

TODAY  the  first 
thought  of  the  en- 
gineering  world  is 
the  VENUS  Pencil. 

Before  new  factories  can  be  started, 
before  the  making  of  munitions  can 
begin,  before  the,wheels  of  any  industry 
can  turn — designs  and  drawings  must 
be  made,  and  for  this 
exacting  service  VENUS 
PERFECT  PENCILS  are 
supreme,  being  world 
renowned  for  smooth- 
ness, uniformity  and 
durability. 

You  have  17  VENUS  black 
degrees  to  choose  from, 
ranging  from  6B  softest  to 
9H  hardest,  and  hard  and 
medium  copyins. 

For  satisfaction  be  sure  to  specify 
VENUS,  look  for  the  VENUS  water- 
mark finish,  and  accept  no  substitutes. 


Rubs  out 
..  Clesnly  and 
i       Easily 
Will  not  soU  or  streak.  12  sizes, 

From  100  to  box.to  4  to  box.  Box  price  ^  2.00 


11* 

I 


FREE 


This  trial  box  with  five 
VENUS  Drawing  Penci  s. 
Holder  and  VENUS  Eraser 
sent  free.     Write  for  it. 


American  Lead  Pencil  Co. 

238  Fifth  Avenue  New  York 

and  Clapton,  London,  England 


If   any   advcrtisemfnt   interests   you,   tear   it   out   now   and  place   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


Mechanical  Electro-Plating  Apparatus 


The  C.  H.  &  V.  W.  Mechanica   Electro-Platinf  Apparatus      Type  B.     Gear  Drive. 

Modern  in  every  detail,  particularly  adapted  for  electro- 
plating quantities  of  small  work  in  bulk.  Saves  time,  labor 
and  material.     Write  for  Bulletin  No.  113. 


Oblique  Plating  Barrel  Apparatus 

These  machines  are  made  in  four  sizes;  they  are  smaller 
and  less  expensive  than  the  Type  B.  A  wonderful  aid  in 
plating  screws  and  other  small  articles.  Write  for  Bulletin 
No.  116. 

We  manufacture  everything  for  Polishing  and  Plating  of  Metals. 

CONSULT  US  AND  REDUCE  YOUR  COSTS 

CANADIAN  HANSON  &  VAN  WINKLE  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

TORONTO  -  -  CANADA 


If  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,   consult   our   Buyers'  Directarv  a^d!  write   advertisers   listed  under  proper   headrngi 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  n  T  A  X     M  A  C  IT  I  X  K  K  Y 


101 


//   any   advertisement   interests  you,   tear  it   out   now   and  place   with  letter$  to  b)  antvtrtd. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


OxyAcetylene  \\^lding  and  Cutting 


tliJCl'liij)     uiltltiui    II    hiul.ui    < 

a    cost   of   onlii   50c    6/;    the    PlcstOLttt    /irociss,    inrnntimi 

(I  serious  loss  of  time  and  production. 

Offset  the  High  Cost  of  Materials 

by  Speeding  Up  Your  Output 

and  Avoiding, Waste 


The    Prest-0-Lite   welding   process 

thousands    of    factories,    machine    s 

fact    wherever    metal    or    machine 

shaped  or  used. 

If  you  are  interested 

reducing    operating    costs 

offset    the    high    cost    of 


V  profitably  used  hv 
mines,  railroads^in 
produced,    moulded. 


aking  your  plant  more  profitable — 
and  effecting  economies  that  will 
naterials   and   enable   you   to    speed 

up.   investigate  now  what  the   Prest-0-Lite   Process  of   Oxy- 

acetylene  welding  will  do  for  you. 

For   repair  work   alone,    it  more  than  pays   its   way,   and    in 

many  lines  of  manufacture  it  has  become  firmly  established 

as  standard  routine  method. 


employs  both  gases  ( acetylene  and  oxygen )  in  portable 
cylinders.  Prest-0-Lite  Dissolved  Acetylene  (ready  made 
carbide  gas)  is  backed  by  Prest-0-Lite  Service,  which  in- 
.i^ures  prompt  exchange  of  full  cylinders  for  empty  ones. 
Provides    dry,    purified    gas,    insuring    better    welds,    quicker 

I'd    lower   operating   cost. 
Apparatus    consists    of    an    equal    pressure    blow    pipe,    auto- 
matic   regulators    and    gauges,    and    all    necessary    equipment. 
Adaptable     for     oxy-acetylene     cutting     by     the     addition     of 
special    cutting    blow   pipe. 

Thorough  instructions  are  furnished  free  to  every  user  of 
Prest-0-Lite  Dissolved  Acetylene.  Any  average  workman 
who  understands  metals  can  learn  the  welding  process 
quickly    and    easily. 

Write  for  valuable  illustrated  literature  and  data  on  work 
others  are  doing  by  the  Prest-O-Lite  Welding  Process.  It 
may  point  out  ways  to  solve  your  problems.  Address  Dept 
C-107. 

THE  PREST-O-LITE  COMPANY,  INC. 

CANADIAN  GENERAL  OFFICES  : 
913-14  C.P.R.  Building  TORONTO 

Direct  Factory  Branches: Toronto,  Ont:  Montreal.  Que.; 

Merritton.  Ont.:  Winnipeg.  Man. 
Canadian  Plants:  ToroDto.  Ont.:  Merritton.    Ont.:  Win- 
nipeg.  Man.;     Shawinigan    Falls.    Que.    (under  con- 
struction.) 

Worlds  Largest  Makers  of  Dissolved  Acetylene 


Are  Your  Men 
Filing  Away  Time? 

You  pay  for  and  expect  to 
get  results — with  men  as 
well  as  with  tools. 

A  good  mechanic  working 
with  a  "Famous  Five"  file  is 
the  unbeatable  combination 
for  filing 

The  file  is  hard,  and  sharp, 
and  will  last  for  a  long 
time.  The  mechanic  knows 
this  and  is  encouraged  to  do 
his  best  because  he  has  a 
good  tool. 

Almostall  purchasing  agents 
now  specify  "Famous  Five" 
Files  when  ordering.  They 
are  Standard  quality  tools. 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,     consult 


Directory   and   write   advertisers   listed   under   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


103 


Electric  Spot  We 


YiriNFIELD  Welding 
has  taken  the  place 
of  riveting  in  a  large 
number  of  shops.  It  is 
electric  welding  devel- 
oped to  top-notch  effici- 
ency, made  applicable 
to  all  classes  of  work,  and 
lowered  to  rock -bottom 
costs. 


Makes 

Riveting 

a 

"Back  Number" 


/^NE  man  can  spot 
^^weld  more  than  ten 
men  can  rivet,  and  do  it 
better,  too. 

We  want  the  opportunity 
to  show  you  how  it  can  be 
done.  Send  us  a  blue- 
print or  a  sketch  of  what 
you  make  and  you'll 
quickly  receive  our  pro- 
position with  facts  and 
figures  that  convince. 


The  Winfield  Electric 
Welding  Machine  Co. 


WARREN,  OHIO 

31  Ottawa  Bank  Building, 


-:-  U.S.A. 

Montreal,  Que. 


//   any  advertisement  interests   you,   tear  it   out   now   and   place   with   letters  to  be  answered. 


104 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


"MECOL" 

6"   Shell  End  Nosing 
Furnace 


We  manufacture  furnaces  for  all 

purposes  to  be  used  with 

any  kind  of  fuel 

The  Mechanical  Engineering  Company,  Ltd, 

THREE  RIVERS,  QUE.,  CANADA 


Welding  Outfits 


Cutting  Outfits 


Leads  the  world  for  range,  efficiency  and 
volume  of  apparatus  in  successful  use. 

"Davis  Apparatus"  offers  the  widast  range  of 
equipment  made  for  employing  to  its  gi'eatest 
value  the  oxy-acetylene  process  of  welding  and 
cutting — hacked  hy  the  longest  service,  the  most 
extensive  experience,  and  the  greatest  develop- 
ment in  apparatus  and  in  api^lication. 
It  is  employed  by  the  most  prominent  concerns 
in  the  iron  and  steel  and  metal  working  indus- 
tries, and  was  awarded  the  highest  honors  at  the 
Panama-Pacific  International  Exposition — two 
Medals  of  Honor  (higher  award  than  the  Gold 
Medal)  and  a  Gold  Medal. 


To  Obtain  the  Best  Results  Use  "  D-B  "  Welding 
Supplies  with  "  D-B  "  Equipment. 

To  make  a  successful  weld,  it  is  as  necessary  to 
have  high-grade  welding  supplies  as  it  is  to  have 
efficient  apparatus  and  competent  labor.  To 
obtain  the  best  materials,  buy  them  from  con- 
cerns known  to  be  familiar  with  these  require- 
ments. 

Davis-Bournonville  oxy-acetylene  welding  rods 
and  fluxes  are  manufactured  after  our  own 
analyses  and  specifications — the  result  of  many 
years  of  experience  in  this  field. 


Carter  Welding  Company  of  Toronto,  Ltd.         '^"""' ""  ^^ "" 


9  Sheppard  St.,  Toronto 


If  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consult    our   Buyers'   Directory   ayid   write   advertisers   listed   under  proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


103 


50,000  lbs.        5-ft.  3-in.  diameter.        92-in.  thick. 

How  Did  They  Cut  It  In  SSJ  Minutes? 


(Photo  by  New  York  Shipbuilding  Corp.)  >  '• 

It  was  cut  with  a  torch  and  gas  flame  —  Davis  -  Bournonville  OxA'-Hydrogen  Cutting 
Apparatus — in  the  New  York  Shipbuilding  Yards;  a  cast  steel  rotor  I4I/2  in-  thick  at 
the  head.  5  in.  thick  at  the  foot,  9I/2  in  thick  and  5  ft.  3  in.  diameter  where  it  was  cut 
—cut  slick  and  clean,  as  shown  in  the  illustration,  in  351/2  minutes'  cutting  time.  It 
would  have  taken  many  hours,  and  been  a  considerable  problem  by  any  other  method. 
DaAds-Bournonville  Oxy-Acetylene  and  Oxy-Hydrogen  Apparatus  is  applied  success- 
fully to  the  problems  in  metal  working,  and  is  in  use  b,y  most  of  the,  big  metal-working 
concerns — foundries,  steel  mills,  ship  yards,  navy  yards,  locomotive  and  car  shops, 
munitions  plants,  sheet  metal-working  factories,  etc.  Make  inquiry  about  it,  or 
write  us. 

"Davis  Apparatus"  Leads  the  World  in  Range, 
Efficiency    and    Number    of    Successful    Users. 

DAVIS-BOURNONVILLE  COMPANY 

General  Offices  and  Factory,  JERSEY  CITY,  N.J. 

CARTER  WELDING  COMPANY,  ZTA'/.'s  TORONTO 


Canadian  Factory,  NIAGARA  FALLS,  ONTARIO 


New  York 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

Cleveland 

Cincinnati 

Chicago 
St.  Louis 
San  Francisco 


Detroit 
Seattle 
Toronto 


//  what  you  nfed  ia  not  advertised,    co7isult   our   Buyers'   Directory   and   write   advertisers    listed   under   proper   headiKg. 


106 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


Cutting  Iron  and  Steel  by  Qxy-Acetylene  Proccss 


Wherever  the  Cutting  of  Iron  and  Steel  is  necessary,  this  method 
is  universally  adopted,  with  a  Saving  of  Time,  Money  and  Labor. 
An  "A.L.S."  Oxy-Acetylene  Welding  Outfit  may  be  instantly 
converted  into  a  complete  cutting  unit  by  the  addition  of  an 
"A.L.S."  Oxycutter. 

For  Cutting  manholes  and  portholes  in  Steel  Plates;  Burning 
off  rivet  heads  before  driving  out  rivets;  and  hundreds  of  other 
similar  purposes,  the  Oxy-Acetylene  Process  is  more  economical 
and  efficient  than  any  other  method,  and  sometimes  performing 
work  otherwise  impossible. 

WHY  NOT  LET  US  TELL  YOU 
HOW  MUCH  YOU  CAN  SAVE? 

Many  firms  have  not  yet  realized  all  that  Oxy-Acetylene  Weld- 
ing and  Cutting  will  do  for  them.  You  may  be  one  of  them.  If 
so,  write  to-day,  we  shall  be  pleased  to  give  you  all  the  informa- 
tion necessary  to  enable  YOU  to  judge  how  much  YOU  may 
benefit  by  the  Process.  An  ordinary  purchaser  of  an  Outfit  saves 
the  cost  many  times  over  during  a  year,  many  save  the  cost  on 
the  first  job.     Is  this  not  worth  investigation  ? 


A   few   minutes   of  your  time 


years  of 


L'A  R  LIQUIDE  SOCIETY 

Canadian  Factories: 

MONTREAL  TORONTO  WINNIPEG 

HALIFAX  (under  construction) 


Quality        Quantity 
Guaranteed 

Write  US  About  Your 
Acetylene  Supply 


Commercial    Acetylene    Welding   Co.,   Inc. 


ATLANTA,  GA. 
AURORA,  ILL. 
BOSTON,  MASS. 
BOUND  BROOK,  N.J. 
EAST  DEERFIELD,  MASS. 


103  Bay  Street,  Toronto 

Main  Office 
80  Broadway,  New  York 


TORONTO,  ONT. 

SAN  FRANCISCO,  CALIF. 

MOBERLY,  MO. 

W.  BERKELEY,  CALIF. 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,  consult   our  Buyers'  Directory  and  write  advertisers  listed  under  proper  heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


107 


iJlilliillililHHIIIIillllllllllilllllllllllllill 


iliiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii 


One  Operator  Merely  Feeds 


This  Machine  i 


This  type  of  Thomson  Electric  Butt  Welding 
Machine  takes  care  of  welding  of  small  duplicate 
pieces,  such  as  rings,  buckles,  etc.,  from  the 
moment  the  operator  places  the  piece  in  the 
clamping  die  until  after  the  weld  is  made.  A 
power-driven  cam  shaft  tightens  the  clamps, 
turns  on  the  current,  applies  the  welding  pres- 
sure, cuts  off  the  current  and  releases  the  clamps 
after  the  weld  is  made.  It  can  turn  out  900  to 
1 000  welds  per  hour. 

Send  for  Bulletin  B-4 

Noise  Doesn't  Always 
Mean  Speed 

When  you  hear  the  rattle  and  bang  of  a  rivet- 
ing shop — you  think  it  means  speed — but  does 
it?  Notice  carefully  how  long  it  takes  to  rivet  a 
small  section — then  go  into  a  shop  using  the 
Thomson  Spot  Welder — no  noi.se,  no  dirt,  no 
danger,  just  quiet,  efficient  work  that  means 
speed.  You  will  .see  one  man  at  a  Thomson  Spot 
Welder  doing  five  times  as  much  work  as  by  the 
old  method,  and  the  welds  hold  better  than  the 
rivets. 

We  will  prove  the  efficiency  and  speed  of  our 
machines  any  time  you  say.  Our  catalog  fully 
describes  our  entire  line  of  spot  welding 
machines.    Where  shall  we  send  YOUR  copy? 

Send  for  Bulletin  S-4 

Thomson  Electric  Welding  Co.   Thomson  Spot  Welder  Company 

Lynn,  Mass. 

Canadian   Sales  Offices,   311   Falls  Street,   Niagara  Falls,   N.Y. 


Hillllllllllllllllllllllillllllllillllllllllilillll 


//  any  advertisement  interests  you,  tear  it  out   now   and  place  with     letters  to  be  answered. 


108 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


These  Two 


TATE-JONES 

Improved  Portable  Gas  Oven  Furnaces  will 
Prove  Money  Savers  in  any  Plant 

Series  A— Recuperative 


For  Temperatures  of  900  deg.  to  1600  deg.  Fahr.  Uses 
Natural  or  Artificial  Gas.  Low  or  positive  pressure  for 
Hardening  Carbon  Steel,  preheating  or  reheating  High  Speed 
Steel. 

For  tool  room  or  manafacturing  purposes,  this  furnace  is  not  only 

economical  in  its  fuel  saving  features,  but  lends  itself  to  various  uses 

up  to  its  temperature  capacity. 

It  lias  been  proven  by  scientific  working  tests  that  the  recuperative 

device  saves  as  high  as  25%  in  fuel.    It  saves  time  and  delivers  a  better 

finished  product. 

The  interior  of  the  oven  is  especially  constructed  so  that  100%  of  both 

the  radiant  and  radiated  heat  is  thrown  to  the  work.     This  is  really 

50%  more  than  can  be  obtained  from  other  furnaces. 

The  fire  brick  and  specially  molded  tile  are 

the  best  obtainable  for  the  purpose.    We  use 

one  inch  of  a  special  insulation  that  is  equiva- 
lent to  nine  inches  of  fire  brick  in  the  preven- 
tion of  heat  loss.     The  outer  casing  of  the 

oven  is  made  of  cast  iron  and  boiler  plate. 

The  recuperator  is  constructed  entirely  of  cast 

iron,  sheet  steel  and  high  grade  fire  brick. 

The  coil  is  IVi"  wrought  iron  pipe,  so  placed 

that  no  direct  vent  heat  can  strike  it.    This 

assures  long  life. 

This  line  of  furnaces    has    many  points  of 

economy  and  ease  of  operation  that  are  more 

apparent  in  use  than  in  the  illustration. 

Sizes     and     complete     specifications     upon 
Ask  for  Bulletin  160-C. 


SERIES  H. 

For  temperatures  1600  deg.  to  2400  deg.  Fahr.  For  hardening 
High  Speed  Steels.  Uses  Artificial  or  Natural  Gas  at  1  1-2  to 
2  1-2  lbs.  pressure.  Especially  valuable  for  hardening  fine 
cutting  tools  and  manufacturing  uses. 

The  loss  of  heat  by  radiation  is  practically  negligible  because  of  the  high  quality 
as  well  as  the  particular  kind  of  linings  used.  The  1"  of  special  insulation  is 
equivalent  to  9"  of  fire  brick  (same  as  used  in  series  A  furnaces). 
Because  it  requires  no  live  heat  to  keep  it  in  temperature  equilibrium,  it  makes  all 
the  heat  delivered,  available  for  work.  This,  naturally,  effects  a  big  saving  of  fuel. 
The  outer  casing  of  the  furnace  is  cast  iron  and  boiler  plate.  The  door,  owing  to 
the  slant  construction,  is  always  tight  to  the  front;  it  overlaps,  top,  bottom  and 
sides — all  of  which  prevents  leakage.  There  is  no  friction  in  opening  the  door. 
Raising  it  a  fraction  of  an  inch  frees  it  from  the  front — when  it  rises  straight  up. 
As  a  Pyrometer  is  absolutely  essential  in  hardening  high  speed  steels  we  supply 
A  Pyrometer  Bracket  especially  designed  for  this  furnace.  For  preheating  high- 
speed steels  use  Tate-Jones  Series  A  Furnace  (described  on  the  left). 
This  Series  H  furnace  can  be  supplied  recuperative  also,  which  means  a  saving 
of  as  much  as  25%  of  fuel. 

Sizes  and  complete  specifications  vpon  request,   .^sk  for  Bulletin  G-7-C. 

TATE- JONES  &  CO.,  INC.,  Furnace  Engineers 

PITTSBURGH,  PA.,  U.S.A. 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consult   our  Btiyers'  Directory  and  write  advertisers  listed  under  proper  heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Type  C-25 

Gilbert  &  Barker  Gas 
and  Oil  Fuel  Furnaces 

are  made  in  over  a  hundred  different 
styles  and  sizes.  There  is  one  type 
that  will  meet  your  conditions  better 
than  any  other — and  we  make  it. 

No  matter  how  exacting  your  work 
may  be,  if  you  have  tempering, 
hardening,  annealing,  case-harden- 
ing, etc.,  to  do,  there  is  a  type  and 
size  of  G.  &  B.  furnace  to  best  meet 
your  conditions. 

Get  catalog  24  which  gives  details. 

Gilbert&BarkerMfg.Co. 

West  Springfield,  Mass. 

;i  Canadian  Agents:     '  ■•  l^a       -' 

WILLIAMS  &  W^ILSON,  Limited.'Montreal,  Que. 
JAMES  DeVON  227   Davenport  Rd.,  Toronto,  Ont. 


The  Right  Heat  is  Easy  with 
the  Right  Furnaces 


Gilbert  &  Barker  Furnaces  are  the  right 
furnaces.  Over  half  a  century's  experi- 
ence in  burning  liquid  and  gaseous  fuels 
for  treatment  of  metals  gives  us  the  con- 
fidence to  make  this  statement. 

We  maintain  an  engineering  depart- 
ment through  which  we  will  be  pleased 
to  offer  you  the  benefit  of  these  years  of 
experience.  Its  service  is  free  to  you. 
Our  business  is  to  increase  the  efficiency 
of  your  forging  and  tempering  rooms — 
put  your  heat-treating  problems  up  to  us. 


Type  F-4 
With  Hood 


//   any   advertisement  interests   you,   tear  it   out   now   and  place   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII 


The  St.  Lawrence  Welding  Company,  Ltd.,  Montreal,  P.Q. 

Office:  138  Inspector  Street  Works:  59  Olier  Street  Telephone:  Office,  Main  5779,  Manager's  Res.,  Westmount  3483 


Consulting  Engineers  on  all  kinds  of  welding.  Break- 
down repairs  handled  at  once,  just  'phone  us  and  we  will 
be  on  the  job  by  next  train. 

Oxy-Acetylene  Welding  of  heavy  cast  iron  frames, 
cylinders,  gears,  water  wheels,  etc. 

Steel,  any  kind  of  welding  on  parts  of  large  or  small 
machines,  tanks,  digesters,  boilers,  shafts,  brackets,  etc., 
can  be  welded  in  place  when  necessary. 

Electric  welding  on  boilers,  digesters,  leaking  tanks,  etc. 

THE  ST.  LAWRENCE  WELDING  COMPANY,  LTD.,  MONTREAL 


Marine  repairs  undertaken  by  our  Marine  Welding 
Tug  which  is  equipped  with  Electric  and  Oxy-Acetylene 
Welding  Apparatus  with  Compressed  Air  Plant  complete. 

Oxy-Acetylene  cutting  of  any  kind  of  steel  construc- 
tion. 

Portable  Welding  Apparatus  of  all  kinds  with  trained 
operators  always  available  to  repair  your  breakdown  at 
once. 


Manufacturers  of  Steel  Tanks.  Ai 


Welded  Tanks.  Etc.    Eleclr 

Lead  Burning  and  Brass  Foun 


:  Welders.  OxyAc 
ry   Work. 


!tyl€ 


!  Welders.   Boiler  Repai 


Williams' "AGRIPPA"  Multiple  Bar  Boring-Tool  Holder  Stops  Waste 


ALL 

"AGRIPPA" 

TOOL  HOLDERS 

CAN  BE 

SHIPPED 

PROMPTLY 


ITS  sleeve  bar  cap  admits  a  straight  or  angular  cutter;  and  you  can  quickly  insert  either  at  the  business  end  of  the 
bar  without  removing  the  cap  or  disturbing  the  setting  of  either  the  bar  or  the  holder. 
You  need  neither  make  nor  buy  any  bushings  hereafter,  for  the  "twin  screw"  fastenings  of  "AGRIPPAS"  within 
their  range  accommodate  any  bar  section  you  may  have  h  andy. 
Now's  the  time  to  begin  saving — caps,  bushings  and  time! 
Procure  your  tool  holder  text  book  here  or  from  your  dealer  and  learn  the  many  other  economies  afforded  by 

Williams'  Grand  Prize  "AGRIPPA"  Tool  Holders 
"THE  HOLDERS  THAT  HOLD" 


Western  Office  and  Warehouse 

40  S.  Clinton  Street 

Chicago,  111. 


.H,^t4iJAWS  &.CA 


THEWRENtH  PEOPLE 

5  weBswtts  iSfflf 61  B'Ba9ia.Tfi"J^«i,\tel;T> 


Quality  alone  is  our 

measure  of  "AGRIPPA' 

Tool  Holder  Value 


The    Oven    Equipment    &   Manufacturing  Company 

NEW    HAVEN,    CONN. 

"CRAWFORD   SECTIONAL"   OVENS 

Heated  with  our  Enclosed  Flame  Gas  Burners,  or  Electricity 

FOR   BAKING   JAPANS   AND   OTHER   FINISHES   ON   METAL. 

Ovens  carried  in  stock  and  built  to  meet  requirements  of  manufacturers. 

Builders  of  All-Steel  Oven  Trucks  with  Roller  Bearings. 

Canadian  Representatives :  The  A.  R.  WILLIAMS  MACHINERY  COMPANY,  Ltd. 

ST.  JOHN,  N.B.  TORONTO  WINNIPEG  VANCOUVER 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consult   our  Buyers'  Directory  and  write  advertisers   listed  under  proper  heading^ 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  N    M  A  C  II I  N  E  R  Y 


in  Temperature 


Let  us  consult  with  you.  Tell  us  your  requirements 
and  let  us  help  with  your  proposition.  We  manu- 
facture temperature  instruments  for  all  departments 
of  metallurgy  and  chemistry,  standard  apparatus  of 
precision,  reliability  and  permanence. 

Tycos  Fery  Radiation  Pyrometers. 


Rare  Metal  Cover  1000°  to  2500°.     These  instruments  have 

,_,,  „  ,  repeatedly  proven  themselves  equal  to  the  most 

i  liermo-L>Ouples      severeoonditions.  Theirruegedness. sensitiveness 
and  accuracy  fit  them  for  any  service  in  ranee.    Send  for  "Booklet  4000." 

Base  Metal  Ranges  from  200°  to  1000°  and  300°  to  1800°.    Pract- 

Thermo-Couples  '''=''.•  ai-,<-""»e  shop  tools  requirini;  no  special  skill 
..  _^  *^         or  intelUEcnce  m  operation.    Write  for  booklet, 

lycos  Cambridge  Pyrometry." 

W'/br -Cambridge  Division 

Jay/or  Instrument  Companies 

Rochester,  N.  Y. 

201  Royal  Bank  Bldg..  Taronto.  Can. 


iiiii:iiiii:i:i:iiiiira[i:i:i'i!n!i;i:ri:i:i:i;i:i:iiii 


i:iii:nTniiiiii|[i:iiiiniiiiii!iii!i'liii^ 


Insuring 

Accurate 

Temperature 

Measurements 

ITHWINO 

I    jHIGH  RESISTANCE  MULTIPLE  RECORDi 

I  PYROMETERS 

g  are  instruments  of  exact  precision.     Yet  they 

g  have  the  rugged  durahility  to  withstaml  hard 

g  usage    in    the    toolroom,    the    steel    mill,    and 

I  similar  places. 

M  Thwing  Instruments  are  furnished  in  either  the 

M  Indicating  or  Recording  .style,  giving  a.s  many  a« 

g  twelve  readings  on  a  single  recorder. 

M  Our  New  Catalog  No.  8  covers  the  entire  line. 

=  Send  for  copy. 


TESTED 


There  are  many  conditions  to  consider 
when  in.«talling  a  furnace.  Among 
these  there  are  two  that  stand  out  prom- 
inently at  the  pre.«ent  time:  The  co.st  of 
operating  the  furnace  and  the  cost  and 
scarcity  of  fuel. 

The  semi-muffled  furnace  illastrated 
here  is  the  best  solution  we  know  to  the 
problem.  Its  cost  in  operating  is 
greatly  reduced  because  of  the  small 
amount  of  fuel  required.  Among  the 
many  other  features  are:  Perfect  com- 
bustion, no  formation  of  any  oxidizing 
elements,  the  flame  is  not  visible  in 
muffle  and  does  not  come  in  contact 
with  material;  retains  heat  for  a  long 
period. 

Our  line  of  furnaces  is  complete.  We 
would  be  pleased  to  .send  you  our 
catalogue  and  full  information  ujion 
request. 

JULIUS  C.  HINZ,   President 

Believue  Industrial  Furnace 

COMPANY 

703  Believue  Ave.     Detroit,  Mich. 

Canadian  Representative: 

H.  W.  PETRIE  LTD.  -  Toronto,  Canada 


Mr.  James  DeVc 


I  Thwing  Instrument  Co. 

I  34th  Street  and  Lancaster  Ave., 

I  PHILADELPHIA,  PA. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu:i:i:i!i!iiiii!iiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiii!iiiii:i:i:^^ 

//  what  you  need  is  not  advertiied.    consult  our  Buyers'  Directory  and   write  advertisers'  listed  under  proper  heading. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


Idle  Machines  —  and  Men 

Pulley  breakdowns  are  costly — men  and  machines  idle 
during-  replacements.  You  can't  afford  to  use  pulleys  that 
break  down. 

But  belt  slip  frequently  eats  up  more  power  and  money 
than  a  manufacturer  dreams  of.  It  not  only  eats  up  power 
but  produces  heat  that  takes  the  oil  out  of  the  belts  and 
shortens  their  life. 


AflERICAN 

^%^  STEEL  SPLIT  ^5^ 

^  PULLEYS  ^ 

The  most  economical  and  erticient  pu'leys  you  can   buy  are   "An 


Steel  Split  Pulleys.  They  combine  prreat  strength  with  light  weight  and 
transmit    maximum    power    with    minimum    belt   slip. 

They  save  belts.  They  reduce  air  resistance  to  a  minimum.  They  are 
capable  of  enduring  higher  speeds  than  any  other  standard  metal  pulley. 
.-;nd  are  puaranteed  to  perform  doub'e  belt  duty  under  all  conditions  not 
demanding  a   special  pulley.     Over  3.500.000  sold. 

Valuable   book.    "Pulley   Efficiency."    FREE   on    request. 

Amsrican  Pulley  Company,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

Canadian  Distributors  : 
Williams  &  Wilson.  Ltd..  Montreal.  Quebec :  A.  R.  Willianas  Machinery 
Company,  St.  John,  N.B. :  A.  R.  Williams  Machinery  Company.  Toronto, 
Ontario ;  A.  R.  Williams  Machinery  Company,  Vancouver,  B.C. ;  A.  R. 
Williams  Machinery  Company.  Winnipeg.  Manitoba ;  H.  W.  Petrie,  Ltd.. 
Toronto,  Ontario.  •  ,_  -  .~^: 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


CONSTRUCTION,  convenience, 
strength  and  speed  are  all  vital  points 
about  a  hoist  and  decide    the    value 
it   will    have  in  a  shop    where  constant  and 
heavy  use  is  the  rule  rather  than  the  excep- 
tion. 

The  Wright  Hoists  are  constructed  ot  steel 
and  malleable  iron  and  with  the  non-fouling 
chain  guide  gives  them  the  qualities  that  in  a 
shop  where  conditions  are  excessive  would 
tend  to  only  strengthen  confidence  in  its 
quality. 

On  munition  work  on  shells  of  the  larger 
size  vohere  strength  and  speed  were  required 
the  Wright  Hoists  were  adopted  by  some 
of  the  largest  plants  in  the  Dominion.  For 
smaller  work  they  are  also  ideal. 

You  should  write  if  you  contemplate  instal- 
ling one  or  more  hoists.  Write  us  for 
complete  information. 


Wright  Mfg.  Company 


LISBON 


OHIO 


U.S.A. 


Canadian  Agents: 
The  A.  R. WILLIAMS  MACHINERY  CO.,  Ltd. 
Toronto       Winnipeg      Vancouver      St.  John,  N.B. 


//   any   advertisement   interests  you,   tear  it   out  now   and  place   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


THE   **SAMSON"   RAILWAY    CAR    MOVER 


Every  railway  siding  should  be  supplied  with  one  of  these 
tools.  Takes  the  place  of  fifteen  men  and  puts  the  heaviest 
loaded  ear  just  where  yoa  want  it.  It  will  pay  for  itself  in  30 
days. 

It  is  one  of  the  most  simple  and  powerful  devices  for  moving 
tars  by  hand. 

It  is  provided  with  Never-Slip  Spurs,  which  is  the  most  im- 
portant feature  on  a  Car  Mover. 

Special  attention  given  to  export  orders. 

Dillon  Manufacturing  Company 

Oshawa,  Ontario 


Eastern  Sales  Agent 
Alexander  Gibb 
3  St.  Nicholas  St.,  Montreal.     Que 


Western  Sales  Agent 
D.  Philip 
138    Portage   Ave.,    Winnipeg,  Man. 


Did  you  ever  notice  somebody  starting  a  conversation  in  a  low  voice  with 
the  two  words  "They  say"?  The  moment  you  hear  it  you  know  it  is 
gossip,  scandal,  and  most  likely  a  lie.  But  when  you  hear  everyone  saying 
that  HARRIS  HEAVY  PRESSURE  is  the  best  BABBITT  METAL  they 
can  use  for  all  general  machinery  bearings,  isn't  it  about  time  to  believe 
them? 

Send  to  our  nearest  factory  for  a  trial  box. 
Manufactured  and  guaranteed  by 

The   Canada  Metal  Company,  Limited 

Hamilton        Montreal  TORONTO  Winnipeg  Vancouver 


Let  the  Boss  Know  It! 


IF  you  are  a  reader  of  Canadian  Machinery, 
go  tell  your  employer  about  it  some  con- 
venient time!  You  couldn't  tell  the  up-to-date 
manufacturer  anything  that  would  please  him 
more.  He  would  know  that  you  are  abreast  of 
the  times;  that  you  are  ambitious  and  inter- 
ested in  your  work;  that  you  are  acquainted 
with  methods  and  machinery  which  make  for 
greater  efficiency.  He  will  say  softly  to  him- 
self: "Here  is  a  live  wire, — I'll  just  keep  my 
eye  on  that  chap." 

If  you  are  not  a  regular  reader  it  will  pay  you 
to  become  one  right  away — quick. 

Subscription  price — $3.00  per  year.  52  issues. 


eptember  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


115 


Bertram  Plays  Safe  By  Using 
Trahern  Rotary  Geared  Pumps 


Rliell  production  requires  uniform  effici- 
ency from  operator  to  lathe — and  thence  down 
to  the  accessories  with  which  the  machine  is 
equipped.  Bertram  uses  TRAHERN  PUMPS 
because  thej'  will  supply  a  variable  stream  of 
coolant  ranging  from  IV2  gallons  to  16  gallons 
per  minute.  Any  amount  you  require  is  at  your 
dispo.?al— the  Special  TRAHERN  relief  valve 
permitting  shutting  off  at  discharge  without 
.stopping  pump. 

Tlie  slow  speed  at  which  the  pumps  can  be 


run,  varying  from  300  to  500  R.P.M.  in  accord- 
ance with  your  requirements,  conserves  the  life 
of  the  pumps.  This  is  not  true  of  the  centri- 
fugal pump,  which  must  be  operated  at  maxi- 
mum speed  to  obtain  the  capacity  desired.  The 
accurate  machining  and  assembling  of  TRA- 
HERN PUMPS  renders  the  danger  of  loss  of 
prime  a  negligible  factor.  The  drive  .shaft  is  of 
high  grade,  cold  rolled  steel.  The  Pumps  are 
constructed  to  prevent  excessive  wear  at  stuffing 
box,  a  distinctive  point  of  superiority  over  the 
centrifugal  type. 


TRAHERN  ROTARY  GEARED  PUMPS  will  increase  the  volume  of  production 
from  your  present  equipment — write  for  particulars. 

TRAHERN  PUMP  COMPANY 


Rockford,  Illinois 

Canadian  Agents: 
A.  R.  Williams  Machinery  Co.,  Toronto,  Ontario 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertUed,  consult   our  Buyers'  Directory  and  write  advertisers   listed  under  proper   heading. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


UT 
GEARS 


Silent  Chain  Sprockets 

Illustration  showing  cutting  of  Teeth 
in  Forged  Steel  Pinion. 

17  T.,   175"  C.P.,  26"  F.,  9.665"  O.D. 
Solid  on  shafts  7'  lii/o"   Ig.  over  all. 


vvrite  for  quotations. 


HamiltonGear&  Machine  Co. 

Van  Home  Street         -         TORONTO 


We  Ship  Gears  to  All  Parts 
of  Canada 


spur,    i:/;  *-i 

Herringbone, 
Spiral  and  Intermittent 

GEARS  and   PINIONS 

le  in  .ill  kinds  of  Melals.  Rawhide  and  Fibr. 


Philadelphia  Gear  Works 

Vine  Street,   Philaaelphia,   Pa. 

Sprocket  Wheels  Made  To  Order 

i        Distributors  of  DIAMOND  CHAINS  for  Machin- 
"Tf^  ery    Power  Transmission,    Motor  Trucks 

\^  ^/  Motor-Cycles  and  Bicycles 


.'V 


Get  our  Gear  Catalog:     "All  About  Gear 


Write   us    when    you    want   good   gears, 
good  service,  '  good   prices 


THE  BERNARD 

Wood   Split 
Pulley 

When  it  comes  to    a    question  of  value, 
we  lead. 

Special   proposition    to  Dealers  in  all 
cities,  where  not  represented. 

Applications  will  be  considered  in  the 
order  they  are  received. 

Write  now,  our  stock  is  complete,  our 
price  low,  and  quality  unsurpassed. 

It  is  worth  your  consideration 

The  A.  Bernard  Industrial  Co. 

Manufacturers  of  High  Grade  Power 

Transmission  Appliances 

Office  and  Works:     FORTIERVILLE,  QUE.,   CANADA 


//  what  yov.  need  is  not  advertised,  consult  our  Buyers'  Directory  and  write  advertisers   listed  under  proper  heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  D I  A  N    MACHINERY 


Why  pay  50%  more  than  is  necessary  for    unloading    your    Pig    Iron    when    you 

can  save  that  percentage  by  using    MATHEWS  GRAVITY  PIG  IRON 

CONVEYOR?     Write  for  our  Bulletin  C. 

CANADIAN  MATHEWS  GRAVITY  CARRIER  CO.,  Ltd. 

484  RICHMOND  STREET  W.,  TORONTO 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


118  CANADIAN    MACHIN: 

^1llllililllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllllillllll|i!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllin^ 

I  How   Many  Trips 

i     r — — — — -'-»-t^-.j_^»     A  Problem  dealing  with 

I     I  Mk.        i  and  the  cost  of  Product 


Volume  XVIII. 


For 


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f 

i'^3 

- 

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m 

^^^1 

^^M 

-^^^■^^B 

^^^^^^^^^^k^- 

ii 

=        The 


Oa  Storage  System 

Provides  safe  storage  facilities  for  all 
is  kept  where  easily  reached,  in  a 
Saves  steps — time— enerfiry. 


A  Problem  dealing  with  human  energy 
and  the  cost  of  Production 

If  the  workman  is  required  to  stop  his  nia- 
cliine,  or  leave  his  bench,  travel  the  entire 
length  of  the  shop — or  perhaps  find  his  way  to 
another  building  to  renew  his  oil  supply— time, 
energy  and  ability  are  wasted.  His  attention  is 
diverted  from  important  work  to  an  operation 
of  no  consequence. 

Bowser  Oil  Storage  Systems  remove  this  con- 
dition— the  oil  supply  is  placed  wjiere  easily 
accessible — only  a  moment  is  required  to  obtain 
a  fresh  supply  of  pure  oil  without  spilling  or 
dripping. 

Bowser  Systems  are  fire-proof;  prevent  oil- 
soaked  floors;  suggest  cleanliness;  are  durable, 
accurate:  an  investment  that  makes  possible 
better  work  with  less  effort. 

Every  shop  needs  the  Bowser — 
Write  Today. 

S.  F.  Bowser  &  Co.,  Inc. 

TORONTO,  ONT. 

Sales  Offices  in  Representatives 

All  Centers  Everywhere 


lii:iii  lil'l:i  II  n:iiliii|ilililiiiliMiii!n!i!iiiiiiiii:ii  i  ii  1 1 1 1 1 1  i:ii:i  i;i  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1  ti  i  iii  i  Ii7 


Speed 
Up— 


IN  War  Times  you  should  get  all  the  speed  out  of 
your  machines  possible. 
You  can  do  this  by  using  BOND  Hangers.    From  the 
day  you  put  a  BOND  Hanger  on  the  job  it  starts 
saving  your  oil,  your  power,  and  your  patience. 
It  is  an  investment  that  yields  a  steady  return  with 
every  revolution   of  your   shafting. 
The  sturdy,  braced  construction  makes  for  smooth 
running  without  vibration.     Its  design  permits  full 
accessibility  for  adjustments  or  erection. 
The  Bond  Hanger  Book  tells   about  everything  we 
make  in  the  line  of  power  appliances. 
Your  files  are  not  complete  without  it. 

CANADIAN  BOND  HANGER  &  COUPLING  CO. 

Limited 
ALEXANDRIA  ONTARIO 


I    Circulating  Pumps 

p  Eliminate  the  separate    relief    valve    and  its  necessary 

1  piping  by  installing  the  Roper  Circulating  Oil  Pump. 

=  But,  you  say,  why  install  a  new  system  when  the'  present 

M  is    good    enough?      This   "good    enough"    article    may 

m  appear  to  be  giving  satisfaction,  but,  is  it  giving  the  best 

1  to  be  obtained.       Can  you  speed  up  \vithout  any  fear? 

g  With  a  Roper  you  need  not  have  any  fear  of  any  kind. 

S  The  oil  flows  from  it  in  a  steady,  even  stream,  and  there 

1  you  can  speed  up  to  full  capacity  and  let  her  go  feeling 

s  confident. 

1  Inquire.     You  will  get  valuable  information  anyway. 

I         C.  F.  ROPER  &  CO. 

I  Hopedale        :         Mass.        :        U.S.A. 


If  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,  consult  our  Buyers'  Directory  and  write  advertisers   listed  under  proper  heading. 


September  G.  191' 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  N    M  A  C  II I  N  E  R  Y 


119 


GRATON&  KNIGHT 

Standardized  Series 

LEATHER  BELTING 

Tanned  by  uj  for  belting  use 


Common  Sense  in  the  Standardization  of  Belting 


You  have  standardized  youi-  signa- 
ture. 

You  buy  standardized  tools,  stand- 
ard printing  paper  and  a  hundred 
other  standardized  things,  instead  of 
having  them  made  to  order.  It  is 
safer  for  you  —  easier  and  more 
economical. 

Why  don't  you  standardize  your 
lielting? 

Consider  what  standardization  has 
done  for  your  own  product ;  for  other 
ju-oduets  you  use. 

Translate  these  advantages  into 
terms  of  belting. 

Analyze  belt  installations.  You 
lind  the  requirements  of  power  trans- 
mission fall  into  a  small  number  of 
sharply    defined    classes  —  about    a 


dozen  if  you  define  them   scientific- 
ally. 

Standardized  Belting  offers  you  a 
standard  belt  that  is  exactly  suited 
to  each  one  of  these  classes.  You 
adopt  the  one  that  is  fitted  to  the 
needs  of  your  own  work.  That  is 
standardization — just  plain  common 
sense  applied  to  power  transmission. 

There  are  Graton  &  Knight  Heart, 
GraKnight,  GraKnight  D  y  n  a  m  o, 
Spartan,  Neptune  and  other  Stand- 
ard Brands — all  standardized  on  the 
basis  of  work  to  be  done  and  condi- 
tions to  be  met. 

Standardize  your  belts.  Consult  our 
representatives.  Submit  your  power  trans- 
mission problems  to  our  mechanical  labora- 
tory— get  expert  advice. 

Write  for  description  of  Graton  &  Knight  Standardized  Series  of  Leather 
Belts,  with  full  information  about  Standardization  as  applied  to  Belting. 

The  Graton  &  ^Knight  Mfg.  Co. 


i.    Oak  Lealhtr  Tan 


I  railier  Uehuie,  Latt  I.rallirr .■I'atkn 


Worcester,  Mass.,  U.S.A. 

(■aTi.iili;iii  Riprcscntatives:  The  Canadian  Fairbanks- 
Morse  Co.,  Limited,  St.  John,  -Montreal,  Ottawa, 
Toronto,  Hamilton,  Quebec,  Calgary,  Saskatoon, 
Windsor,    Vancouver,    Winnipeg,    Victoria. 


'&:Mm 


j>i-in.  three-ply  Oraton  <f  Knight 
Spartan  Belt  on  Finishivfj  Steel  Mill 
Drirr  ill  plant  of  T'ps<in  Xut  Com- 
l„niii.  llri  rlnnd,  Ohio. 


what  you  need  is  not  advertised,  eonfult   our  Buyers'  Directory  and  write  advertisers  listed  under  proper  heading. 


120 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


CANADIAN  MADE 


CANADIAN  MADE 


Electric   and    Hand    Traveling    Cranes 


Single  Girder  Electric 
Hoist  Crane,  Type 
D-158.  1  Ton  to  10 
Tons. 

Made  also  double  gird- 
er  design. 


We  make  a  wide  range 
of  CRANE  and  HOIST 
designs.  All  sizes  and 
capacities,  1  ton  to 
100  tons. 


Get  oar  prices  and 
spe^'iflrations  before 
.vou    bay. 

Ill  asking  prlfes, 
state  SERVICE. 
CAPACITY,  SIZE 
OR  SPAN  PO«T!R, 
and.  If  electric. 
KIND  OF  CUR- 
REST. 
Catalogs   free. 


Northern  Crane  Works,  Limited 

Walkerville,  Ontario,  Canada 


a      a 


CURTIS,  St.  Louis,  U.S.A. 


AIE  OOJIPKESSORS  —  AIR  HOISTS  —  TROLLEYS  AND 
TROLLEY  SYSTEMS— SAND  gLASTS— PNEUMATIC  AND 
HYDRO-PNEUMATIC  ELEVATORS— JIB  AND  TRAVELING 

CRANES. 

We  have  specialized  for  over  22  years  on  pneumatic  machinery. 
We  have  developed  the  simple  air  cylinder  into  a  straight  line 
motor  with  wonderful  speed  control  and  dependability  capable 
of  the  widest  application  to  hoisting  problems. 

Our  new  controUed-splash  oiling  system  with  regulatable  sight 
feed  cylinder  oiling  is  something  entirely  new  in  air  compressor 
design. 

ulars  on  our  entire  line 


Curtis  Pneumatic  Machinery  Co. 


1585  Kienlen  Avenue 
New  York  Office 


St.  Louis,  U.S.A. 
532F  Hudson  Terminal 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consult   our  Buyers'  Directory  and  write  advertisers  Hated  under  proper  heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


^ 


STEEL 


''I've  handled  all  kinds  of  hangers 
since   I   started   ruiUwrighting;   but 
these  'Pioneer'  Steel  Harxgers  are  my 
choice.     Why?    The  answer's  easy. 
I  can  hang  them  all  day  snd  alone  if 
necessary.    These  old-fashioned  ca.•^t- 
iron  hangers  seemed  to  weigh  a  ton 
around  three  o'clock  in  the  afternoL-; 
It  took  three  of  us  to  handle  thf^m   • 
It's    different    nov/;    ihe  .  bo 
'Pioneer'  altogether.    They're:,  ...... 

and  I  never  yet  heard  of  a  'Pioneer" 

coming    down  —  and 

that's  a  mighty  good 

l)oint.    The  dilference 

in  first  cost  is  in  favor 

of    the    -Pioneer,'    so 

they    are    preferable 

every  way  vou  look  at 

them." 

Aak  for  our  booklet 

"Transmission  Data. " 

It's  worth  reading. 


^TU  Take  the 
Steel  Hanger 


Every  Time'' 


Standard  Pressed  Steel  Co.,  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  U.S.A. 

Sole  Distributors  for  Ontario: 

H    W.  Petrie,  Limited,  Toronto,  Ontario 


//   any  advertisement   interests   you,   tear  it   out   now   and  place   with   letters  to  be  ai, swered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVin. 


CARTRIDGE 

MACHINERY 

Waterbury  Farrel 

Standard 

co.^        Machines 


Standard  Loading  Machineiin  Government  Araenal 


The  Waterbury  Farrel  Foundry  &  Machine  Co.,  of  Waterbury,  Conn.,  U.S.A., 
has  appointed  me  to  be  the  sole  manufastnrer  for  export  of  their  entire  line  of 
Cartridge  and  Shot  Shell-Making  Machinery.  Proposals  and  Estimates  cover- 
ing complete  plants  or  separate  units,  required  for  export  will  be  furnished  on 
request. 

FREDERICK  S.  BLACKALL,  Woolworth  Tower,  New  York,  U.S.A. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


123 


Men  can't  be  standardized 

Work  must   be 


It  is  natural  for  men 
to  be  different  — to  be 
original.  Itis natural 
that  each  machinist 
should  want  to  work 
in  the  way  he  thinks 
best.  And  it  doesn't 
matter  much  how  he 
works  so  long  as  re- 
sults are  the  same. 
But  that's  just  it  —  re- 
sults must  be  the 
same.  Parts  must  fit. 
Any  differences  are 
costly.  Accurate 
standardization  de- 
mands accurate  tools. 
That's  why  machinists  everywhere  use 

Si^vvcit  Tools 

They  know  they  are  dependable.  They  may  doubt  the  accuracy  of 
the  layout,  or  even  of  their  touch,  but  they  never  doubt  the  accuracy 
ofStarrett  Tools.  ^^^ ,    - 

In  buying  your  micrometers,  calipers,  gages,  combination  sets, 
caliper  squares,  tapes,  straight  edges  and  other  tools  make 
your  choice  from  the  2,100stylesand  sizes  of  the  Starrett  line. 

Setii^  for  Catalog  No.  21 3 


The  L.  S.  Starrett  Co. 

The  World's  Greatest  Tool  Makers 
ATHOL,  MASS. 

New  York  London 


//   any  advertisement   inte 


}ilace   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


:<;i24 


C.VNAD.IAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIir. 


\\'hen  the  quality  of  the  work 
i.~  the  best  obtainable,  the 
next  item  is  speed.  For  upon 
speed  depends  your  costs. 

One  rivet  per  second  is  the 
.-peed  this  machine  will 
maintain  indefinitely.  Adapt 
that  speed  to  your  require- 
ments and  find  out  the  value 
the  Grant  Riveter  would  l)e 
to  you. 

Write  for  our  catalogue.  It 
will  give  you  complete  infor- 
mation. 

Grant  Mfg.  &  Machine 

Company 
Bridgeport,    Conn.,    U.S.A. 


i 

18" 

for  m 
horse 
the  d 
capac 
usage 

Cha 

217  1 

EL  M  ES 

Stroke  Hydraulic  P 

aximum  pressures  and  capacities,  : 
-power  motor — a  pump  designed  t 
emand  for  a  high-pressure  outfit  o 
ity,  and  one  able  to  withstand  the 
of  present-day  practice. 

Other  designs  for  all  pressures  am 
capacities. 

tries  F.  Elmes  Enginee 
Works 

^0.  Morgan  Street             CHICAG 

ump 

or  250 

0  meet 

f  large 

severe 

I 

ring 

0,  ILL. 

The  New  "West'' 

Banding  Press 

For  9.2"  and  8"  shells 

12    Cylinders;     Ample    Power;     Ample 
Strength ;  Reasonable  Price. 

NO  ACCUMULATOR  REQUIRED. 

The  West  Tire  Setter  Co. 

255  Mill  Street,  Rochester,  N.Y. 


^'ERIE"  STEAM  FORGING 
HAMMERS 

are  not  ordinary 
hammering  mach- 
ines. They  are 
Hammers  of 
exceptional 
merit.  Inves- 
tigate and  sat- 
isfy yourself. 

A  bulletin  for 
the  ask- 
ing. 


ERIE    FOUNDRY     COMPANY 

ERIE,  PENNSYLVANIA,   U.  S.  A. 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consult    our   Buyers'   Directory   and   write   advertisers   listed   tinder  proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


125 


T  TAVE  you  examined  the  patented  Ball  Joint  Con- 
-■-  ^  nection  on  the  smaller  Consolidated  Presses? 
This  ball  joint  is  instantly  adjustable  for  wear,  all  lost 
motion  can  be  eliminated  by  loosening  the  locking 
screws  and  adjusting  the  ball  cap  downward — no 
machining  or  filing  required. 

There  is  another  important  feature  in  considering 
this  connection.  The  ball  cap  and  adjustable  split 
bushings  can  be  removed  from  the  connection  screw 
without  removing  the  screw  from  the  connection  or 
disassembling  any  other  parts. 

That  is  economv  that  cannot  be  overlooked. 


Consolidated    Press    Company 

HASTINGS  LARGEST  EXCLUSIVE  MANUFACTURERS  OF  POWER  PRESSES  IN  U.S.A.  MICHIGAN 

Canadian    Representatives:     A.    R.    WILLIAMS    MACHINERY     CO.,     Limited,    Toronto,    St.    Jolin,    Winnipeg,    Vancouver 


Triple 
Purpose 


"METALWOOD" 

COMBINATION 

Forcing,    Broaching    and 
Straightening  Fress. 

Its  value  is  in  the  many 
uses  to  which  it  is  adapt- 
able. Auxiliary  table-s 
and  fixtures  add  greatly 
to  its  usefulneiss.  It  is 
not  "encumbered"  with  a 
single  excess  part.  Built 
for  production. 

Metalwood 
Mfg.  Co. 

Leib&  Wight  Sts., 

DETROIT,  MICH. 

U.S.A. 

For  Great  Britain  and 
Continent  address  Gaston 
E.  Marbaii,  Coronation 
House,  4  Lloyds  Ave.. 
London.     E.G..     England. 


PRESSES 

Pumps 
and 
Accumu- 
lators 

FOR  ALL 
PURPOSES 

Made  in 

Canada  *^^ 

\^_^  NOSING    PRESS 

WILLIAM  R.  PERRIN,  Limited 

TORONTO 


//   any   advertisement    interests   you,    tear   it   out   noui   and  place   with   letters  to  be  anstvered. 


126 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 
H 


THE  strength,  evident  in  the  constiuction,  is  but  one  feature  that  goes 
to  stamp  this  Model  C  Becker  High  Power  Vertical  Miller  as  the 
superior  machine  of  its  class.  Its  quantity  production,  of  course,  is 
its  chief  feature  (increasing  production  40  to  360%),  but  strength  and 
quality  form  two  arguments  that  back  up  its  production  and  are  convinc- 
ing. It  has  proved  a  decided  asset  to  many .  It  is  one  of  our  14  types  and 
24  sizes  to  suit  your  needs.    Let  us  co-operate  with  you. 

Becker  Milling  Machine  Company 

HYDE  PARK,  BOSTON,  MASS.,  U.S.A. 


The  A.  R.  Willi 


npany.  Limited 


nd  Hamilton 

limited.  Montreal.  Qu 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consult   our   Buyers'   Directory   and   write   advertisers   listed   under   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


The  New 
Cincinnati  12" 
Knee  Type 
Manufactur- 
ing Miller  for 
Repetition 
Work 

Arms  manufacturing 
plants  and  any  other 
shops  turning  out  great 
quantities  of  small  parts 
will  find  this  machine  in- 
tensely profitable.  Ca- 
pable of  standing  up  to 
the  drive  of  twenty-four 
hours  a  day  service,  and 
giving  maximum  produc- 
tion at  all  times.  It  is 
compact,  having  only  12 
table  travel.  It  is  powerful 
— 4  h.p.  at  the  spindle. 
The  drive  is  by  constant 
speed  belt,  with  a  com- 
mercial range  of  feeds 
and  speeds,  and  for  the 
sake  of  simplicity,  quick 
change  mechanisms  have 
been  avoided,  the  change 
in  feed  or  speed  being 
made  b  y  interposing 
change  gears. 


The   Cincinnati   12-inch  Knee  Type  Manufacturing  Miller 

(Patent   Bights    Fully   Reseired) 
Single  Pulley  Drive — 4  H.P. — Twelve  speeds — Four  feeds 

It  Is  Handy 

The  operator  stands  at  the  end  of  the  table. 
Assnine  that  a  new  piece  has  been  chncked: 
He  runs  the  table  forward  with  his  right 
hand  at  2^4  per  turn  of  the  hand  wheel.  A 
dog  hits  the  trip,  which  automatically  dis- 
engages the  hand  movement,  and  at  the 
same  time  throws  in  the  power  feed.  When 
the  piece  has  been  milled,  another  dog  dis- 
engages the  power  feed,  and  the  operator 
brings  the  table  back  by  hand,  ready  to 

chuck  a  new  piece.  This  in  (jnirk  action.  The  oper- 
ator can  slam  the  table  forward  as  fast  as  he  pleases 
without  danger  of  jamming  the  work  into  the  cutter. 
The  trip  dog  takes  care  of  that,  and  it  can  be  set  so 
iliat  the  work  will  he  clo.'^e  u})  to  tlie  cutter  before  the 
power  feed  engage:^,  thus  reducing  the  power  travel 
of  tlie  work  to  a  niininiuin. 

Ask  for  i-oniphtr  spccificiili'ins. 

THE  CINCINNATI  MILLING  MACHINE  CO. 

CINCINNATI,  OHIO.  U.S.A. 


If   any    advertisement   interests   you,    tear    it    out   now    and   place   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


128 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


The  XSa&  Milling  Machine 

For  Intense  Production 


MILLING 
MACHINES 

lead  the  field 


Power   Feed 
Milling  No.  3 


The   Fox   Milling   Machines   are  ideal,  as  they  are  particularly 
adapted  for  just  that  sort  of  work. 

Every  machine  is  provided  with  micrometer  dials  on  the  vertical  and 
transverse  movements,  thus  insuring  accuracy  in  every  detail. 

Write  for  full  particulars. 

FOX  MACHINE  COMPANY 

1047  W.  Ganson  Street,  Jackson,  Michigan 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,   consult    our   Buyers'   Directory   and   write   advertisers    listed   under  proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


r  A  \  A  n  1  A  N     M  A  C  ri  T  N  E  H  Y 


A  Real  Achievement 

in  Special  Cutter  Making 

The  most  modern    manufacturing    facilities   enable    us    to  produce  special 
cutters  accurately  and  within  short  order. 

The    quality   of    material    is    backed    up     by   skilled    workmansliip,    expert 
supervision  and  service. 

The   Cleveland  Milling  Machine   Company 

CLEVELAND,  OHIO 


A    COMPLETE 

STOCK  ON 

HAND 

Plain  Milling 

Cutters 
Side  Milling- 
Cutters 
Angular  Cut- 
ters 
Metal  Slitting 
Saws 
Shell  End 

MUls 
End  Mills 
Woodruff  Key- 
way  Cutters 
Counterbores 
Gear  Cutters 
Collets  and 

Arbors 
Convex  Cut- 
ters 
Concave  Cut- 
ters 
Corner  Round- 
ing Cutters 
lu  fact   a   full 
line   of   Stand- 
ard Cutters. 

IMMEDIATE 
■    DELIVERY 


If   any   adverdscmoit    interests    you,    tear    it    out    now    and    place    with   letters  to  be  answered. 


130 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVill. 


Universal  Gear  Hobber 

The  machine  which  completes  our  lines  to  cut 
all  types  of  small  gears  except  internal,  within 
10"  dia.  8  Pitch. 

The  Bilton  Gear  Hobber  will  cut  spur  spiral 
gears,  worm  gears,  also  various  special  shapes 
of  teeth.  It  can  cut  a  .spiral  gear  on  end 
of  a  shaft  1%"  diam.  24"  long. 

SPECIFICATIONS 

Capacity  Gears:  10  Diametral  Pitch 

10  in.  Outside  Diameter 
10  in.  Width  of  Face 

Range  of  hob  feed  50-250  R.P.M. 

Range  hob  feed  to  each  rev.  of  worm  .010  to  .125 

Drive:  3  Steps  Cone  Pulley;  2'/2  in.  Belt 

Weight  2,100  lbs. 

A  machine  of  latest  design,  introducing  new 
features  which  increase  production  without 
.sacrificing  accuracy.  The  hob  is  cutting  con- 
tinuou.sly;  operation  of  machine  entirely  auto- 
matic. 

DELIVERY 

A  few  of  these  machines  are  now  availalile  for 
October  delivery. 

Send  for  copy  of  neiv  catalog  No.  'M),  and  bul- 
letin describing  this  machine. 

The  Bilton  Machine  Tool  Co. 

Bridgeport,  Conn. 

Foreign  Agent,:     Alfred  Herbert  Ltd..        M.  Mett  EnKineering 
Co..     Chas.  Churchill  &  Co. 


THOUSASDS  IN  USE 


The 
Whitney 

Hand 
(Feed) 
Milling 
Machine 


The  vertical  feed 
is  provided  for  by 
the  SLIDING  HEAD. 
On  account  of  this 
feature  the  work  can 
be  held  close  to  the 
table,  thus  giving  a 
rigidity  not  possible 
on  other  types  of 
Hand    Millers. 


Send  for  Catalogue   A. 


The  Whitney  Mfg.  Co. 


Hartford 


Conn. 

s-Keys-Hand  Milli 


U.S.A. 


CONDENSED  IN  SIZE   BUT  OF 

GREAT     CAPAICITY 

A  great  deal  of  work  is  being  done  in  shops  on  large 
milling  machines  that  could  be  done  more  rapidly, 
more   efficiently  and  cheaper  with  our 

ILIq  I  U.S.  Improved 
nUi  I  Hand  and  Weight 
Feed   Milling   Machine 

It  takes  up  little  room  and 
though  small  it  has  a  mar- 
vellous capacity  for  work — 
HAS  MORE  POWER 
THAN  ANY  SIMILAR 
MACHINE  ON  THE 
MARKET. 

We  will  be  pleased  to  give 
you  the  full  details  of  its 
value. 


United   States 

Machine   Tool 

Company 

Cincinnati,  Ohio 
U.  S.  A. 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,  consult   our  Buyers'  Directory  and  write  advertisers  listed   under  proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


131 


HALL 

Pipe  Threading  Machinery 

AND 

Shell  Cutting-off  Machines 

This  illustratiuu  sbinvs  the  new  No.  8  Hall 
Gear  Box  Driven  Pipe  Lathe.  Regular 
Caixacity  2io"  to  8"  nielusive. 

The   last   word   in   Fipe  Machine 
Construction 

Let  us  give  you  full  particulars  of  this 
machine  which  is  only  one  of  a  large  num- 
ber having  capacity  i-^"  to  18'  pipe. 

Write   us    for  catalog  and  prices  on  : 

Pipe  Threading  Machines  Nipple  Threading  Machines 

Roller  Pipe  Cutters 

or 

Cutting-ofiF  Machine  for  shells  or  bar  stock. 

Any  capacity  '/%"  to  18". 

John  H.  Hall   &   Sons,   Ltd. 

BRANTFORD,   CANADA 

EUROPEAN   AGENTS : 
Universal  Machinery  Corporation^  Limited,  London 


Made  in 
Canada 


GARVIN 


NO.  12  PLAIN 
MILLING  MACHINE 

FOR  ALL  LIGHT  MANUFACTURING 

This  machine  is  built  especially  strong  and 
substantial  for  a  tool  of  its  capacity,  and 
has  many  valuable  features  worthy  of  spe- 
cial mention.  The  slide  is  fitted  with  a 
(luick  pitch  screw,  giving  one  inch  per  turn. 
This  combines  the  rapidity  of  a  rack  feed 
with  the  steadiness  of  the  screw  feed.  The 
table  has  an  oil  pan  all  around  it,  with  fin- 
ished edges — automatic  feed,  trip  and  re- 
verse— adjustable  nut  on  the  feed  screw  to 
take  wear — the  Feed  Screw  is  hardened. 

Adjustments 18  x  6  x  15  in. 

For    Further    Information     I  ^.^^R^,?^?,s''D'i^kl^ 

IMMEDIATE  DELIVERIES 

Send  for  Complete  Catalog 

Manufactured  by 

THE     GARVIN    MACHINE     COMPANY 

Spring  and  Varick  Streets  (  Visitors  Welcome  }  50  Years  New  York  City 


No.  12  Plain  Milling  Machine -Use  Code  Abrade 


//    any    advertisement    interests    yru,    tear    it    out    now    and    place    with  letters  to  be  answered. 


132 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII, 


'li^U 


THOMAS  A.  EDISON  INC.  KNOWS  HACK  SAWS 


SO  thoroutilily  is  the  name  of  Edison  associated  with 
the  scientific  knowledge  that  comes  from  exhaustive 
research  and  positive  proof,  it  goes  without  saying 
that  the  Edison  organization  is  buying  STAR  BLADES 
on  facts  and  not  on  faith. 

If  you  as  a  manufacturer  hick  the  Edison  research  facili- 
ties, you  can't  do  better  than  follow  the  Edison  example 
and  use  STAR  BLADES. 


Remember,  il'>  not  the  cost  of  the  blad&s,  but  the  cost  of 
the  cuts  that  counts.  The  factory  that  is  considering 
blade  efficiency  as  blade  cost  or  number  of  cuts  or  speed 
of  cuts  alone  is  figuring  with  only  part  of  the  facts. 
Make  a  scientific  efficiency  test  on  hand  or  machine 
lihules,  that  covers  all  your  co.^^t  items  and  you  are  sure 
to  standardize  on 


STAR  HACK  5AW  BLADES 


Machine  and  Hand 

Star  Blades  were  the  first  modern  blades  ever  manufac- 
tured and  the  very  idea  of  renewable  metal-cutting  blades 
originated  in  this  factory. 

Our  thirty-year  quality  supremacy  has  been  maintained 
at  the  cost  of  constant  metal-cutting  research.  Hundreds 
of  thousands  of- tests  ha^ve  been  made  to  determine  exactly 
what  thickness,  width  and  length;  what  shape  and  setting 
of  teeth,  and  what  steel  comjiosition  and  tempering  would 
give  the  best  metal-cutting  results  under  all  kinds  of 
conditions. 

These  standards  of  quality  never  vary  because  our  blades  are 
manufactured  by  special  automatic  machinery  to  gauges  of  the 


Flexible  and  All  Hard 

finest  limits.  And  this  machinery  makes  possible  an  enormous 
quantity  production  at  a  minimum  of  factory  cost. 
Star  Blade  quality  with  all  it  has  meant  in  the  past  is  higher 
to-day  than  ever  before.  It  is  an  important  fact  that  the 
standard  methods  of  manufacture  used  by  all  the  other  hack- 
saw makers  were  abandoned  by  us  more  than  twenty  years  ago 
for  our  more  efficient  methods.  The  Star  line  includes  blades 
for  every  purpose — machine  and  hand — flexible  and  all  hard. 
Whatever  metals  you  are  cutting,  there  is  a  Star  Blade  that 
will  give  you  thi  g'reatest  cutting  efficiency  at  the  smallest  cut- 
ting cost."  Make  your  own  drastic  tests  to  prove  this  or  place 
the  burden  of  proof  on  us  and  we  will  demonstrate  it  for  you 
beyond  all  doubt.  Put  your  cutting  problems  up  to  us  and  we 
will  welcome  a  chance  to  help  you  solve  them. 
Address  Engineering  Department,  Millers  Falls  Company,  230 
River  Street,  Miller's  Falls,  Mass. 


$500.00  FOR  YOUR  EXPERIENCE 


blades)    and  give   us   your   conclusions   with   absolute  truth   and   frank- 
including    some    of    the    records    of    your    results.      It    is    not    necessary 


clear- 
tlow    I 
ine   or 

to    be   a    Star    user   to 
experience    whatever   it 
closes    November    30th. 
and   in   our   advertising 

vin    a    place    in    this    prize    award.      We    want    your 
s.      Get   your   reply    in   as   early   as   possible.      Contest 
The    best    replies    will    be    published    in    book    form 

5th    Prize    $15.00 

25.00 

6th   to    llth    Prizes $10.00   each 

Our  position  as  authorities  on  metal  sawing  efficiency  has  made 
national  clearing  house  of  information  on  the  results  blade  user 
getting  under  all  classes  and  kinds  of  conditions.  To  encourage  this 
ing  house  idea,  we  offer  $500.00  in  gold  for  the  best  articles  on  "I 
Test   Hack    Saws."      Tell   us   your  methods    in   detail    (either   on    mach 

1st   Prize    $250.00  3rd  Prize 

2nd     Prize     100.00  4th    Prize 

Manufactured    By  Sole     Distributors 

CLEMS  ON   BROS.    IVilLLERS   FALL5    CO. 

MIDDLETDWN.    NEW   YORK  MILLERS    FALLS.    MASS. 

//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consult    Ojir   Buyers'   Directory   and   write   advertisers   listed    under   proper   heading. 


September  G,  1917. 


r A N  A  D I A  N    MACHINERY 


IRRE5ISTIBL£ 


Sc 


CUUM 


SEND 
CATALOGrUE 


NAPIER     SAW     WORKS,     INC. 

SPRINGFIELD,  MASS.,  U.S.A. 

Manufacturers  of  the  "QUALITY"  BRAND 
HACK  SAWS  BAND  SAWS 


//   any   advertisement    interests   you,   tear  it   out   now   and   place    Kith  letters  to  be  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


Highest    Award    Panama     Exposition 

Williams  Tool    Company 

Erie,  Penn.,  U.S.A. 


Canadian  Agent. 
The  A.  R.  Williams  M 
Co.,     Ltd.,      Toronto. 


European  Agents: 


e  Machines 

Threading 
Cutting-off 

Quality  will  tell  in  every 
test.  At  the  Panama  Ex- 
position the  Williams  Cut- 
ting-off Machine  was  given 
the  highest  award.  What 
does  that  mean  to  you  ? 

It  means  that  your  pipe- 
threading  and  cutting-off 
operations  will  cease  to 
give  you  any  cause  to 
worry  if  you  are  "Wil- 
liams" equipped. 

Made  in  11  different  sizes, 
each  machine  handling  8 
to  10  consecutive  sizes  of 
pipe  from   Vi"  to  18"  dia. 

Williams  cutting-off  mach- 
ine is  an  investment,  not 
an  expenditure.  It  realizes 
exceptional  dividends. 

Write  us  at  once! 


ry   Corp.         ^ 

England   l|1|||||||||{|iri||||l|||||||i|;|l|i|||||||l|||||||l|||||||:|i|H|:||||||||||||||||||l!|||||!|||| 


Tel.  Main  6755 


Jos.  Bickerstaff,  Mgr 


.^ 


.N» 


<0 


^^^0//,,^^ 


'^ 


645  East    King  Street 

TORONTO  ^^ 


^. 


You  have  tried  the  rest.  Now 
use  the  best  for  screw  cutting 
and  threading. 


Our  standard  is  uniformity  at 
all  times  and  a  guarantee  of 
quality  with  every  barrel  of 
oil  produced. 

PRICES  ON  APPLICATION      -  ^ 


THE  IMPROVED 

TAYLOR-NEWBOLD 


INSERTED  TOOTH   COLD  SAW 

WRITE  FOR  BULLETIN  T-S 

Tabor  Mfg.  Co.         Philadelphia,  U.S.A. 


If  xohat  you  need  is  not  advertised,  consult  our  Buyers'  Directory  and  write   advertisers   listed   under  proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


DOUBLE  SAVINGS 

in  cutting  on  PEERLESS  HIGH  SPEEDMETAL  SAWS; 
thejr  save  both  Time  and  Material. 

Supposing  you  save  only  1/16  on  each  cut.  200  Ibe.   of  material  are 
sayea    on    100    cuts    of    12    in.    round.      Your    sarinffs    may    be    seyeral 


Have  you  ever  stopped  to  consider  the  waste  of  material  „  „.„„ 
cuts,  especially  at  the  present  high  cost,  will  pay  for  a  PEEK/LESS 
m  a   remarkably  short   time. 

This   is   only  one   of  the   reasons   for  so  many  repeated  orders   and 
large  concerns  having  standardised   the   PEERLESS.     The  many  other 
reasons  can   only   be   fully   appreciated   after  comparative   test- 
Write   for  a  list   of  users;   some   of   these  machines   may   be  working 


wide 


lity.     A  careful  investigation  always 


nthu 


PEERLESS  MACHINE  CO.  ^^l^Sl'^^d^.A. 


Your  Cutting 

How  do  you  do  it?  Are  your  meth- 
ods giving  satisfaction?  Are  you 
getting  the  maximum  production? 
With  a  Racine  to  compare  results 
with  you  will  get  a  better  idea  of  the 
results  you  should  be  getting  or 
could  get.  Metal  cutting  has  been 
our  study.  It  is  the  purpose  for 
which  our  machines  are  built.  We 
stand  ready  to  co-operate  with  you  in 
your  cutting  problems.  Write  us  for 
information. 

Racine  Tool  Sl  Machine  Co. 

15  Melbourne  Ave.,  Racine,  Wis.,  U.S.A. 


FORBES 

Pipe  Cutting 

and 

Threading 

Machine 


Ideal  Machine  for 
all  Kinds  of  Work 

Especially  Fine  Work 


The  "Forbes"  is  the  ideal 
Pipe  Cutting  and  Thread- 
ing Machine  for  any  job, 
but  it  is  especially  essen- 
tial where  the  work  in 
hand  is  of  a  high  class 
order — where  the  reputa- 
tion of  your  (irm  is  at 
stake.  Joints  threaded  by 
the  Forbes  Machines  will 
bear  the  most  critical  in- 
spection.  They  never  leak. 


It  is  the 


nly 


market  with  receding 
gear  which  carries  the 
dies  into  the  pipe.  It  is 
also  entirely  self-contain- 
ed, motor-driven  and  can 
be  easily  carried  to  its 
work. 


Catalog  on  Request 


Curtis  &  Curtis  Co, 

Garden  St.    .Bridgeport,  Conn 


//   any  advertisement  interests   you,   tear   it   out    now   and  place   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


"STERLING" 

Hack  Saw  Blades 


Made  in  lengths  from  6  in.  to  36  in.,  and  in  widths  from  Yi  in.  to  2 
in.,  for  all  sizes  of  power  hack  saw  machines,  also  hand  frames,  and 
in  gauges  and  pitches  suitable  for  cutting  all  kinds  of  metal. 

The  material  in  these  blades  is  the  very  last  word  in  the  steel 
makers'  craft;  added  to  this,  the  correct  mechanical  construction, 
also  very  special  heat  treatment  given  to  the  steel,  go  to  make  up  the 
highest  efficiency  in  a  hack  saw  blade. 

Regular  "STERLING"  Blades,  in  both  power  machine  and 
hand  frame  sizes,  are  hardened  throughout,  and  drawn  to  a  degree 
to  combine  toughness  with  hardness. 

"STERLING"  Blades  for  hand  frames  are  also  made  with  a 
double  hard  edge,  the  greater  part  of  centre  being  left  soft,  making 
them  strong  and  rigid  as  well  as  flexible. 

Manufactured  By 

Diamond   Saw    &    Stamping    Works 

357-361  SEVENTH  ST. 

Buffalo,  N.Y.,  U.S.A. 


ij  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,   consult   our   Buyers'   Directory   and   write   advertisers   listed    under   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


137 


Inches 
of 

Solid 
Steel 


V.  S.  W.  No: 
High  Speed  Hack  Saw  MacL_, 

A  hiiih  grade  machine  too!  in  des^ign  con- 
struction, :ind  workmanship — for  the  econom- 
ical cutting  of  all  inetais  up  to  9"  x  9". 

Built  heavier  and  stronger  than  actually 
necessary  to  stand  the  modern  tendency  to 
()\-er  crowd  and  over  speed  without  unnatural 
wear  or  getting  out  ot  order. 

We  cannot  emphasize  too  strongly  its  high 
grade  construction,  the  simplicity  of  its  devices, 
its  .;ilence  and  smoothness  in  operation,  and  its 
rigidity  and  strength. 

You  should  have  a  V.  S.  W.  machire. 

Plus  VICTOR  blades,  of  course. 

Write  us  for  complete  description. 


Victor  Saw  Works  limited 

Hamilton,  Canada 


;/   any  advertisement   interests   yon,    tear   it   out    now   and   place   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


138 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


Th( 


Universal   Grinder 

For  General  Tool  Room  Work 

This  Gi'iuder  is  furnislied  with  attachnieiits  for 
grinding  all  sorts  of  milling  cntters,  reamers, 
connterbores,  and  other  machine  shop  tools. 

It  is  also  suitable  for  cylindrical,  internal  and 
flat  work  which  frequently  turns  up  in  the  making 
of  tools  and  jigs. 

These  attachments  are  all  very  simple  in  design 
and  easily  adjusted  upon  the  machine,  being 
graduated  so  that  any  desired  angles  can  be  at 
once  obtained. 

The  whole  machine  is  thoroughly  well  built,  well 
finished,  and  will  be  found  a  dependable,  con- 
venient grinder. 

Greenfield  ^Machine  Company 

Greenfield,  Mass.,  U.S.A. 


A  Matchless  Machine  for  its  Size 


The 

Fitchburg  Grinder 

Model  A 

This  Fitchburg  Model  A  is  doing  a 
class  of  work  formerly  done  on 
bigger,  slower,  and  more  expensive 
class  of  machines.  So  it  is  a  hig 
and  genuine  cost  cutter. 
It  was  built  for  speed,  capacity  and 
accuracy,  and  is  fiUing  the  bill.  It 
is  doing  a  varied  class  of  work 
impossible  on  any  other  grinder. 
Get  the  full  details  of  our  Model  A  and 
other  types. 

Fitchburg  Grinding  Machine  Co. 

Fitchburg,  Mass.,  U.S.A. 


//  what  you  need  w  not  advertised,   consult   our  Buyers'  Directory   and   write  advertisers   listed   under  proper  heading. 


September  G,  191'i 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


130 


piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiHtiiiiiiiiiiiiHNiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiim 

I  WJiicliEqaipmoiLlBolilbuNeed?  | 

S  \/C7  ilt;^  tlie  I)uiaore  Portable  Ctnnder  first  came  on  tlie  market  a  few  years  ago,  hardly  ^ 

sa  VV    ^"y'^^'iy  would  believe  us  wheu  we  said  it  made  30,000  Jx.I'.M.    "It  can't  be  done,"  they  ss 

=  said — until  we  took  the  little  grinder  right  out  in  the  shop  and  proved  that  it  could  —a 

=s  ana  that  it  turned  out  work  with  the  finest  degree  of  accuracy.  = 

S  Now.  the  Dumore  is  being  used  in  thousands  of  manufacturing  plants  and  machine  shops,  ^ 

■ss  grinding  tools,  gages,  dies  and  similar  work.      And  the  same  men  who  once  said  this  high  ^ 

~  >peed  was  noi  practical,  now  say  they  can't  get  along  without  the  Dumore.  ^ 

S  Three  types  of  equipment  are  shown  below.  All  armatures  are  dynamically  balanced.  All  types  ^ 

S  are  equipped  witli  S  K  I''  Ball  Bearings  and  the  well-known  Dumore  Universal  Motor,  operat-  ^ 

=  ing  on  either  direct  or  alternating  current.  ^ 

S  \\'hicli  equipment  do  you  need?  S 

WISCONSIN  ELECTRIC  = 

Let    us    send    you    a  .^^^^^^^^^^^^^  COMPANY 

!S;  Dumore    Grinder    on 

jSS         approval.      Be    sure 

^^  state  .^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^     American 

^  on  ^J^^^^^V^P^V^P^^'^^^^^^ 

sa         request.  m  ^^k    ^     ■     A   ■    ^m    #   a    V    ft    1     H^^^k  England 

lllltiiKllltillllliltliilliilllfi 


//   any  advertisement   interests   you,   tear   it   out   now   and  place   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


Wilmarth  &  Morman 
No.  1 

Big  Production 
Surface  Grinder 

for 

Immediate  Delivery 

Rigid — Accurate 
Convenient 

Capacity  6  in.  x  14  in.  x  10  in. 
Circular  on  Request. 

Wilmarth  &  Morman  Co. 

Makers  of 

DRILL  GRINDERS— SURFACE  GRINDERS 
UNIVERSAL  GRINDERS 

1200  Monroe  Ave.,  N.  W. 

Grand  Rapids,  Mich.,      U.S.A. 


Has  This  Happened  to  You  ? 

More  than  likely  it  has — often.  And  when  it 
does  do  you  fuss  around  trying  to  get  hold  of 
the  broken  pieces,  injuring  the  threads,  wasting 
time  and  temper? 

If  you  do,  the  Walton  Tap  Extractor  will  be  a  wel- 
come addition  in  your  tool  chest.  With  it  a  broken 
tap  presents  no  difficulties  and  makes  little  lost  time. 
The  crucible  steel  fingers  of  this  strong  device  go 
down  into  the  flutes  and  it  is  then  a  simple  matter 
to  back  the  tap  out  by  applying  a  wrench  to  the 
squared  outer  end  of  the  tool.  The  thread  is  unin- 
jured in  the  process,  the  casting  or  forging  is  saved 
and  an  otherwise  nasty  job  has  been  handled  with- 
out trouble  or  loss  of  time. 

The  Walton  Company 

Hartford,  Conn. 


UNIVERSAL 
Electric  Drills 

Licensed    Under    Burke 
Universal  Motor  Patent 

No  shop  which  does  not 
use    one    or  more   Thor 
Electric  Drills    is   work- 
ing   to    full      efficiency 
which  every  shop  should 
do    during 
these  critical 
times.     Let  us 
demonstrate    why      you 
should  use  Thor  Electric 
Tools    in    preference    to 
other   makes. 

Independent   Pneumatic  Tool 
Company 

Office  :  334  St.  James  Street,  MONTREAL,  QUE. 

Toronto:  32  Front  St.  W;  Winnipeg:  123  Bannatyne  Ave..E: 

Vancouver:   1142  Homer  Str.et 


//  what  you  7teed  is  not  advertised,     consult   our  Buyers'  Directory  and  write  advertisers   listed   under  proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Stow  Shell  Grinders 
Increase  Production 

Suspended 
Pedestal 
Mounted 
on  Truck 

Any  Size 
Any  Current 

Immediate 
Shipment 

Stow  Manufacturing  Co. 

Binghamton,  New  York,  U.S.A. 
Oldest  Portable  Tool  Manufacturers  in  America 


Grinding  Wheel  Dressers 


We  are  specialists 
in  Grinding  Wheel 
Dressers  and  can 
r  e  c  0  m  m  e  nd  the 
])est  t3'pes  for  any 
l^artieular  needs. 

Our  Dressers  are: 
Diamo-Carbo 
Desmond  Huntington,  3 

sizes 
Sherman  Corrugated,  2 

sizes 
Norton  Zig-Zag,  2  sizes 
Magazine 
Diamonds 

We  can  promptly  sup- 
ply your  needs  from  our 
stock. 

The 

Canadian  Desmond  -  Stephan 
Manufacturing  Company 

HAMILTON,  ONTARIO 

Alfred   Herbert.  Ltd.,  Coventry.  En 
Agent  for  Great  Britain. 


Smooth  Bores 

We  have  designed  for 
our  own  use  a  simple 
and  inexpensive 
grinder  to  give  the 
final  touch  to  the  bore 
of  our  shells. 

It  does  the  work,  and 
we  will  have  some  of 
these  machines  on  the 
market  shortly. 

Write  us  for  our  pro- 
position. 

Marsh   &   Henthorn 

Limited 

BELLEVILLE,  ONTARIO 


//   any   advertisement   interests   you,   tear  it   out   now   and   place   with  letters  to  he  answered. 


142 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


Just 


Press 


The  New 
Carborundum  Catalog 

BETWEEN  its  covers  you  will 
find  a  wealth  of  information 
— real  practical,  helpful,  data  on 
various  classes  of  grinding — a  de- 
tailed story  of  the  making  of  Car- 
borundum and  Aloxite  grinding 
wheels — helpful  tables  on  speeds, 
grits  and  grades, — a  hundred  and 
one  things  of  practical  value  to  all 
wheel  users — and  the  book  shows 

A    Working  Drawing  and  a  Photographic   Reproduction  of 
Every  Shape  andSize  Wheel  Used  on  all  Standard  Machines 

At  the  top  of  each  page  is  a  photographic  reproduction  of  the  wheels — below 
is  a  detailed  cross  section  drawing  showing  every  dimension— as  readable  as 
a  blue  print.  It  is  a  simple,  practical,  entirely  new  method.  The  Carborun- 
dum Catalog  should  be  in  every  plant  where  grinding  wheels  are  used. 

A.  handy  miniature  copy  for  shop  use  can  be  had  upon  request. 


THE  CARBORUNDUM   COMPANY 

NIAGARA   FALLS,  N.  Y. 

NEW   YORK      CHICAGO      PHILADELPHIA      CLEVELAND       CINCINNATI      BOSTON 
PITTSBURGH       MILWAUKEE       GRAND   RAPIDS 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


^mM 


\§^^^^^^0. 


^:^;i§^^f/^0m^/r^m!^^;i0^^*imm::rf'-^  ""-'^-.i.%tm 


mmi 


SELF-OPENING  and  ADJUSTABLE  DIE  HEADS 


The  Die  Heads  tliat  have  made  good  on  every  threading 
operation,  and  which  are  constantlj'  meeting  the  demand  where 
Die  Heads  are  required  tor  accurate  thread-cutting. 

In  purchasing  "MODERN"  Die  Heads  you  have  the 
assurance  that  you  are  getting  tools  of  "quality,"  mechanically 
perfect  in  design  and  construction  and  uniformly  efficient  in 
all  sizes. 

Ilhistration  shows  an  installation  of 
"MODERN"  Die  Heads  threading  Shell  Ogives, 
where  the  requirements  are  precision  and  large 
production. 

Complete  information  regarding  the  use  of 
"MODERN"  Self-Opening  Die  Heads  upon 
request. 

MODERN  TOOL  COMPANY 

Main  Offi 
nd  Peach  St 

Canadian  Agents 
Belnap.         -  Toront 

F.   WESLEY  PARKER 

Resident  Engineer  and 

Export  Agent, 

25Rector  Street.  New  York 


//   any   advertisement    Interests   you,   tear  it   out  now   and  place   witn  letters  to  '■e  amteered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


It's  Mighty  Good  Business 
Management  To  Install 
M.  E.  C*  Air  Cylinders 


Because  of  their  money-saving  service.  They  improve  and 
increase  your  output  and  decrease  your  operating  costs.  They  are 
lighter  than  others,  yet  are  more  durable  and  compact. 

Style  "D"  shown  above  is  double  acting;  operates  in  either 
direction. 

The  pistons  are  packed  with  high-grade  twist  lubri- 
cated packing  supported  by  a  tapered,  adjustable 
piston  ring.  In  the  application  of  power  to  chucks, 
the  M.E.C.  Air  Cylinder  will  be  found  ideal.  End 
thrust  in  air  supply  connection  has  been  eliminated 
and  a  minimum  number  of  parts  assured,  because 
of  cai-eful  design.  It  is  as  near  leak-proof  as  is 
possible  to  make  an  air  cylinder. 


Manufacturers  Equipment  Co. 

171  North  Jefferson  St.,  Chicago,  111.,  U.S.A. 

Agents  for  Canada 

J.  R.  STONE  TOOL  &  SUPPLY  COMPANY 

Goebel   Building.    Detroit.    Mich. 


Ask  for  literature 
about  M.E.C.  air- 
operated  two  and 
three-jaw  chucks, 
air  -  operated 
hinge  collets,  ex- 
panding mandrels 
and  collapsible 
taps. 


//  ivhat  you  need  is  not  advertised,   consult   our   Buyers'   Direcioi^j   and   write   advertisers    listed   under   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  0  I  A  N    M  A  C  H  I  N  E  K  Y 


Air  Chucks  on 


Our  catalog  will  tell  you 
some  very  interesting 
facts  about  these 
chucks.  Send  for  it 
to-day. 


On  munition  work  Hannifin  chucks  have  demonstrated 
their  time  and  labor-saving  features  in  a  marked  man- 
ner. The  photograph  shows  one  of  a  long  line  of  lathes 
boring  six-inch  shells — all  equipped  with  Hannifins. 

In  your  own  plant — whether  you  are  making  shells  or 
whether  you  are  doing  general  manufacturing,  Han- 
nifin Air-Operated  Chucks  will  aid  you  to  speed  up 
production. 

Their  instantaneous  action,  positive  grip  and  ease  of 
operation  will  save  time  to  the  extent  of  increasing 
output  20  to  100  per  cent. 

And  if  you  have  adopted  female  labor,  the  problem  of 
unskilled  help  will  present  fewer  diflficulties.  The 
operation  of  the  Hannifin  is  so  simple  that  very  little 
effort  is  required  by  the  operat-or. 

Hannifin   Manufacturing   Co. 

Chicago,  111.,  U.S.A. 


REPRESENTATIVES:  -R.  E.  Ellis  EnKineering  Co..  ChicaBO  :  Coats 
MBchine  Tool  Co..  New  York  City;  A.  R.  Williams  Machinery  Co..  Toronto; 
Williams  &  Wilson.  Montreal:  The  Canadian  Fairbanks-Morse  Co.. 
Montreal.  EUROPEAN  REPRESENTATIVES :— Coats  Machine  Tool  Co.. 
Ltd..  London  :  Fenwick  Freres  &  Co..   Paris  ;  Iznosskoff  &  Co..   Petrograd. 


//   any   advertieement   interests  you,   tear  it   out   now   and  place   with  letters  to  be  answered. 


146 


C  A  N  A  D I A  N    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


You  Should  Know  Its  Points 


Among  its  man}-  distinct  features  is  one  that  is  the 
most  convincing  argmnent  and  the  reason  why  you 
should  be  "Murchey"  equipped.  That  is — its  adjust- 
able feature.  For  comparative  purposes  we  will  take 
a  solid  tap.  When  the  first  grinding  on  a  solid  tap  is 
made,  the  original  accuracy  is  at  once  hist.  The  more 
grindings  the  greater  the  inaccuracy.  With  the  Mur- 
chey Adjustable  Tap,  when  the  first  grinding  is  made 
the  adjustable  feature  allows  for  absolute  accuracy. 
The  chaser  may  be  adjusted  to  compensate  for  wear. 
This  gives  the  Murchey  Tap  the  life  of  ten  solid  taps. 
Think  that  over.  One  tay)  will  take  several  sizes.  Taps 
cover  a  range  of  I14'  to  12*. 

An  inquiry  would  secure  our  immediate  co-operation. 


Murchey  Machine  &  Tool  Company 

75  Porter  Street  -  -  Detroit,  Mich. 

The  Coats  Machine  Tool  Company,  Ltd.,   Caxton   House,   Westminster,  London,  S.W.,  England, 
Glasgow,  Newcastle-on-Tyne,    and    Fenwick    Freres  &  Company,  15  Rue  Fenelon    Paris,  France. 


For  Positive  Accuracy — 


and  Big 
Time  Saving 


"Victor"  Collapsible  Taps 
are  simple  in  construction; 
the  few  parts  can  be  made 
large  and  strong;  the  body 
is  machine  steel,  and  the 
chasers  are  high-speed; 
screw  adjustment  from  front 
end  malies  it  easy  to  main- 
tain close  accuracy;  trip  is 
automatic;  reset  by  means 
of  lever.  The  above  features 

— and  others — make  the  "Victor"  a  time  and  money 
saver  for  severe  service.  It  is  being  used  by  many  shell 
manufacturers. 


VICTOR 

Collapsible 

TAPS 


Victor  Tool  Company 

Waynesboro,   Pa.,    U.S.A. 


Your  Threads 

Will  they  stand  improvement?  If  they 
will  and  you  want  the  best  results — 
H.  &  G.  Automatic  Self-Opening  Die 
Heads  will  do  the  trick. 

The  Chasers  are  set  and  held  in  place  by  a  steel 
cam,  which,  once  adjusted,  locks ;  there  is  no 
stoppage  or  changing  in  size.  The  quick  release 
not  only  insures  the  cutting  of  the  thread  to  a 
given  point  every  time,  but  permits  cutting  right 
up  to  a  shoulder  when  necessary. 

Write  for  our  booklet! 

Eastern  Machine  Screw  Corp. 

NEW  HAVEN,  CONN.,  U.  S.  A. 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consult    our   Buyers'   Directory   and    icrite   advertisers   listed   under   proper   heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


117 


^nCLD 


//'   any   advertisement   interests   you,   tear  it   out   now   and   place   uilh  letters  to  be  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


HINTS  MBUYERS 


BUILDERS  OF  MACHINERY 

WHAT  SET  SCREWS  DO  YOU  USE  ? 


BRISTO 


Safety  Set  Screws  have  passed  every  test  for 
safety,  and  strength.  The  patented  fluted  de- 
g^g^  sign  produces  a  contracting  effect  which  per- 
g^^      mits  tightening  to  an  unyielding  grip  without 

£ 3      injury  to  the  screw. 

^— ^      Bristo   Safety  Set  Screws   have  been   adopted 
as  the  standard  by  many  prominent  machine  builders. 
Ask  for  free  samples  and  Bulletin  1-809. 

THE  BRISTOL  CO..  Waterbury,  Conn. 


THISTLE^'BRAND  RUBBERBELTING 


"Maintenance  oE 
Quality" 

is  our  motto,  and  our  ex- 
perience in  the  manufac- 
ture of  belting  since  the 
year  1856  should  be  in- 
valuable to  you.  Let  us 
tell  you  all  about  this 
friction  faced  belting. 
The  price  will  appeal 
to   you. 

Write    to-day. 

J.  C.  MoLAREN    BELTINQ 

CO.,  LTD. 
TIRaNTO.  MONTREAL,  WINNIPEQ 


IS  YOUR  RIVETING 
PROFITABLY  DONE? 

Our  Elastic  Rotary  Blow  Riveting  Machine 
does  profitable  work,  because  one  machine  will 
do  the  work  of  several  hand  riveters,  and  do 
it  better. 

Every   head   is  perfectly   formed,   any  shape, 
round,   flat,  oval,   rectangular,  etc. 

Catalogue  C  tells  more  about  it. 

Tht  F.  B.  SHUSTER  COMPANY 

New  Haven.  Conn. 

Formerly  John  Adt  &  Son.  Established  1866. 
Also  makers  of  Wire  Straishteners  and  Cutter. 


Machii 


etc. 


^^'e  iiuard  your  purchases  and  tell  you  if  you 
are  settiii.c;  what  you  are  supposed  to  get. 

Once  you  have  formed  the  liabit  of  consulting 
us  for  expert  advice  you  wonder  how  you  got 
along  without  our  service. 

CANADIAN    INSPECTION    AND    TESTING 
LABORATORIES,  LIMITED 

Head  Office  and  Main  Laboratories— MONTREAL 

Branch  Offices  and   Laboratories: 

TORONTO.     WINNIPEG.     EDMONTON.     VANCOUVER. 

NEW  GLASGOW 


STEELmilNGS 

We  are  well  equipped  to  make 
all  kinds  of  steel  castings,  100 
lbs.  to  50,000  lbs. 

Dominion  Steel  Foundry  Co. 

u         1.  LIMITED  ^    .     .V 

Hamilton  Ontario 


«ivE«DSrEEL  TANKS 


FOR  EVERY 
PURPOSE 


OIL  STOPAGE-  GASOLINE  TAN  KS -AIR  RECEIVERS 
PNEUMATIC  WATER  SUPPLYTANKS-  SMOKESTACKS 
BOILER  BREECHING  -  RIVETED  STCELPIPE-BINS&HOPPERS 


WE  MANUFACTURE  RIVETS  of  every 
description,  V^    inch.   dia.    and    smaller 

PARMENTER  &  BULLOCH  CO.,  LTD. 

GANANOQUE.  ONT. 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consult   our  Buyers'  Directory   arid  write  advertisers   listed  under  proper  heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


RICHMOND 

<S> 
CHUCKS 


Universal  Geared 
Scroll  Type  with 
either  one  or  two 

sets  Jaws. 


Richmond  Mfg. Co.,  Ltd 


183-185  George  Street 


TORONTO,  CAN. 


Zenith  Coal  &  Steel  Products  Limited 

GOAL  COKE  HACK  SAW  BLADES 

CARBON  STEEL      MACHINERY  STEEL 

HIGH  SPEED  STEEL 

Royal  Bank  BIdg.,  Toronto;  McGill  BIdg.,  Montreal.Que. 


Ac/iusloalos 

lenses  will  not  break  into  the  eye. 

THE    STRONG.    KENNARD    &    NUTT    CO. 
511   Schofield  Bide.  Cleveland.  Ohio 


For  Hardness  Testing 


n  shop  and  laboratory  use  the 

Standard  Scleroscope 

Universally  adopted;  direct  reading; 
inexpensive,  and  the  only  instrument 
that  agrees  with  others  of  its  kind 
in  all  parts  of  the  world,  thus  solv- 
ing problems  of  ordering  materials 
to     specification. 

EOOKLET    FREE. 

Heat  Indication 

by   optical   means    ia    fast   becoming 
(COPE  the     correct     thing.        The     PVRO- 

SCOPE     has     aolTed     the     problem. 
Perfect    constancy,    inexpensive,    no    electricity    used.      Built    to 
stand   rough   usage   and   upon  common-sense   lines.      Used  by   the 
nd    best    firms. 


Shore  Instrument  &  Mfg.  Co.  sss-?  w.  22nd  st.  New  York 

A*.ntifarCan.da:  A.  R-WilliamaMachr,  Co..  Ltd..T«rent..  Caa. 


You   want   Tool   Holders  that  have   made  good 
ARMSTRONG  TOOL  HOLDERS 

Won   The 

GRAND    PRIZE 


THEY  ALWAYS 
MAKE  GOOD 


Write  for   Catalog. 


Armstrong  Bros.  Tool  Co. 

"The  Tool  Holder  People" 
S.  Fr.nciaco  At...  CHICAGO.  U.S.A. 


SKINNER 
DRILL 
PRESS 
VISE 


.\  substantial,  durable  tool  whk-li  will  pay  for  itself  in  short 
oriler  iu  nny  machiiif"  shop.  I-'our  sizes  ti*  aicommodate  a 
%vkU'  range  of  worl;.     Try  one  and  you'll   buy   more. 

Printea    matter    promptly    niaileil    on    request. 

THE    SKINNER    CHUCK    COMPANY 

New  York  Office.  London  Office  San  Francisco  Office 

94  ReadeStreet  1  49  Queen  Victoria  St .  Rialto  BIdg. 

Factory  and  Main  Office.  New  Britain,  Conn..  U.S.A. 


CLUTCHES 

Combined    Jaw    and    Friction.       Friction  only 
Gas  Engine  Clutches.    Jaw  Clutches. 

Write  far  lataraatiat  vrintad  mattar. 

The  Positive  Clutch  &  Pulley  Works,  Ltd.,  Canada 

MONTREAL  Factory:  Aarora.  Got.  TORONTO 


LANDIS  MACHINE    CO.,   INC. 

WAYNESBORO,  PENNA. 

Manufacturers  of  BOLT  and  PIPE 
THREADING   MACHINERY 

Exclusive  Canadian  Agents: 
William.  &:  Wilson,  MONTREAL,  CAN. 
Write  for  Catalogue  No.  22 


HAMILTON 


CANADA 


^^     gj^Mj 

►     High-Class 

j^^LjpdH 

L  Pumps 

^^^^^^^^Wm 

P           for 

every 

'^^^'^w*  ■ 

service 

The  Smart-Turner  Machine  Co. 

Limited 
Hamilton                                        Canada 

/ 


SHAFTING 


Cold  Drawn,  Turned  and  Poliihed  Steel, 
Rounds,  Squares,  Hexagons  and  Flats,  Steel 
Piston  Rods,  Pump  Rods. 

Spaelal  facintlM  for  Karmatla*  up  to  6  lo,  diaraeler. 

THE 

Canadian  Drawn  Steel  Co. 


//    any    advertisement    interests    you,    tear    it    out    now    a„d    phiec    with  litters  to  be  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVin. 


Metal  Testin- 
Instrument 


the  Bvinell  Meter-' 

for  determining  the  hardness 
of  metals  and  metal  products, 

Ihe  Erichsen  Machine 

for  testing  met&I  sheets 
and  strips. 

^   WRITE  FOCOVTAIDGUCS^ 

Herman  AJolz.lMadigonAveM 


NORTON   JACKS 

FOR  ALL  KINDS  OF  HEAVY  LIFTING 

Send  for  complete  catalogue  showing 
50    styles    10  to   100    tons  capacity. 

Made  only   by 

A.   O.   NORTON,   LIMITED 

Coaticook,  Prov.  Quebec  -  -  Canada 


GEARS  AND  GEAR  CUTTING 
SPROCKETS  AND  CHAINS 

In  stork  and  to  order  any  size  from 
oue-quarter  ineli  to  six-foot  in  diameter, 
any  material.  Estimates  and  gear  ad- 
vite  cheerfully  furnislied. 

Grant  Gear  Works,  lBC.,iL\«.  m»:: 

G.  B.  GRANT  U.S.A. 


For  Marking  Shrapnel  Shells 

or  they  will  mark  any  article, 
either  round  or  flat.  Po-ner  or 
Hand   Machines  recommended. 

Steel  Stamp  and  Die  Cutting  by 
expert  engravers. 

Send  for  Catalogne. 

Noble  &.  Westbrook   Mfg.  Go. 

Hartford.  Conn..  U.  S.  A. 


Beaudry  Hammers 

FOR    GENERAL     FORGING 

Save  Fuel,  Time  and 
Labgr.  Cut  Forging 
Costs  in  two. 


BELT  OR  MOTOR  ORIVEN 

BEAUDRY  &  COMPANY,  Inc. 

141  Milk  Street.  Boston.  Mass. 

Alfred  Herbert.  Ltd..  Coventry.  Ens- 
land.  London,  Paris.  Calcutta.  Yo- 
kohama. 


NEW  AIR-TIGHT  BLAST  GRATE 

FOR  LOW  AND  MODERATE  PRESSURE  AIR 


Save  that  air   (money)   von  are  now  lusing   tbrongh  leaky  blast  gates. 
Our   XBW    AIR-TIGHT    BLAST   GATE   stops   this   loss. 

Circular  123-B  explains  its  many  other  advantages,  outlining  clearly 
it.s  all-round  superiority  over  the  ordinarj*  light,  flimsy,  cheap,  leaky 
and  unreliable  blast  gates,  and  Ihe  hc-ivv.  cumbersome,  expensive  and 
s\ I  iw-act mg    gate    valves    and    stop    cocks. 

Ask    for    ciiXJular    and    list    of   users. 

W.  S.  ROCKWELL'COMPANY 

FURNACE  ENGINEERS  AND  CONTRACTORS 
50  Church  St.  (HudsoniTerminal  Building)  New  Yoric 


SENT  ON  TRIAL 


Hand  or  Breast 
Drills,  12  sizes, 
sizes     fitted     with 


We  make  complete  line 
of  Portable  Electric 
Drills  and  Grinders  for 
all  purposes.  Especially 
built  to  withstand  hard 
usage.  For  all  currents 
and  voltages. 

Catalog? 


Cincinnati  Electrical  Tool  Co.,  Cincinnati,  Ohio 

New  York  Office:  50  Church  Street 


S>^ 


Finest  Diamonds 

and  Diamond  Tools 

THE  GENERAL  SUPPLY  CO 

of  Canada,  Limited 

OTTAWA        TORONTO  MONTREAL      WINNIPEG 

last,    125  Adelaide   St.  W.,   408  MoGUl   Bldg..   85  Water  8 

Sole  Canadian  Agents    for 

GEO.  A.  JOYCE  CO.,  Ltd.    ^  .„<f 


.^* 


NEW  YORK         LONDON        -^ci'^^S^ 


•  <r  THE  4  DAVIS 

Milling  Attachment 

and  Compound  Table 


come   up. 

For  any  Drill  Press 
14"  to  42"  swiuE. 
Big  Economy  —  Bic 
■CcAiTeTiience—  SmaJl 
Price.  It  relieves 
voiir  large  millers, 
comes  in  handy 
s  p  0  tting  castings, 
milling    ends    of    bosses, 


Fon:i 


33.      We    also 
for    rebonng 
ar,    and    a    reliable    air 
-all  at  special  factory  p: 
Write    for   circulars   to-day. 

Hinckley  Machine  Works,  TuiSJofs'' 


September  6,  1917. 

-^iimiiiiiiii]in3!in:i[i:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;iiiiiiii 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


151 


tire  B  a  t  i  sfnctlon. 
The  (1  i  a  ui  0  u  d  s  in 
Ihese  tools  .ne  of  the 
hardest  :ind  liest  quality 
and  set  very  securely. 
Tvetigtb  of  Hand  Tool  shown  here 
'.J  in.  over  all,  liosewood  handle. 
3  send  you  an  assortment  for  selec- 


fcw 


The  ITtirlbtit-Rogers  Cutline-Off  and  Center- 

lu'^  MarbiDP  1?  a  bifr  producer  because 
■.In-Ti-  arf  TWO  TOOLS  instead  of  one. 
""iking    in    the    same    cut. 

RIGID     AND    AC- 

saving?;    effected    in    very 

riTjL     DBT.\ILS. 

The  Hurlbut  Rogers  Machinery  Co. 

So.  Sudbury.  Mass. 

FOREIGN'       AGENTS:       England.       Chita. 
Churchill  &  Co..  Ltd..  London.  .Manchester. 
Glasgow     and     N'ewcastle-on-TsTie. 
~      W.     PETRJE,    TORONTO.    CANADA. 


months. 
A.SK      F(1R 


HIMOFF  MACHINE  CO., 

40-50  Mills  St.,  Astoria,  N.Y. 

Makers  of 

Lathes,    Turret    Lathes,    and    Gear    Hobbers 


Francis  &  Co. 


l.lii.ij  iiiiiiiiiiiiiJiiii;iii;ii;iii:i:i:i:i;i!iTi  i:n:i:i:i;iiiii|j:i  I1I11I  iii:iiiii!Nii:iiiiiiiii 


the  HURLBUT-ROGERS 
CUTTING- OFF  MACHINE 


nd  you  our  catalog. 


PRESSES  — ALL   TYPES 

^S^^'^ 

Press  Attachments.  Automatic. 

M^^^i. 

Metal  and  Wire  Forming  Machines. 

i^T^lrly 

Tumblers — Large  Line. 

^^^ 

Burnishing  Machines.   Grinders. 
Special  Machines. 

Baird  Machine  Co.,  Bridgeport,  Conn.  U.S.A. 

Cushman      Chucks 


Lathe  Chucks,  Drill 
Chucks,  Portable 
Face  Plate  Jaws. 


The     Cushman 
Chuck  Co. 


13-14-15  Inch  Swing 

Give  service — stand  the 

test  of  time.    The  first  Sebastian  Lathe  built  over  30  years  ago. 

Send  for  c.it.ilnj;. 

The  Sebastian  Lathe  Co.  cinc^innau'o..  v.Ta. 


PRESSES 

FOR 
CUTTING 
FORMING 
DRAWING 
PUNCHING 
STAMPING 
EMBOSSING 
and  COINING 
BAR  and  SHEET  METAL 

Ferracute  Machine  Co. 

PresTo  201    Brldgeton,  N.  Jersey,  U.S.A. 


Wilkinson  &KOMPASS 

TORONTO    HAMILTON   Winnipeg 

IRON  AND  STEEL 

HEAVY  HARDWARE 

MILL   SUPPLIES 

AUTOMOBILE    ACCESSORIES 

WE     SHIP     PROMPTLY 


Gardner    Disc    Grinder 


Gardner  Disi' 
Grinders  are  made 
In  all  sizes,  typed 
and  combinations 
We  can  success- 
fully Dice.  any 
disc  grinding 
problem  in  exist- 
ence. Largest 
builders  of  Dls. 
Grandlng  machin- 
ery in  the  world. 

Gardner 
Machine    Co. 

The    Disc    Grindine 

Authorities 
Beloit.Wis.U.S.A. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


Babbitt    Costs    Lowered 

The   use   of   "Frost   King"    invariably   reduces    babbitt 

expenses.       Its     efficiency    and     splendid    performance 

under  heavy  duty  have  made  it  an  international  favorite. 

"Frost  King"  is  an  all-round  babbitt  perfected  after  40 

years'  experience  and  experiment. 

The    constant    use    of    "Frost    King"    will    lower    your 

expenses. 

HOYT  METAL  COMPANY 

EASTERN  AVE.  and  LEWIS  ST..  TORONTO.  CANADA 
New    York.    N.Y.  London.    Eng.  St.  Louis.     Mo. 


H  a  Si  :r    1^  ]  j\j  o 


Socket  Head  Cap  Screws 

Meet  all  the  requirements  of  machine  tool  builders 
who  need  a  stronger  and  better  screw  than  the 
slotted  fillister,  hexagon  head  or  square  head  cap 
screw.  Can  be  set  up  hard  and  loosened  without 
marring  the  heads.  Are  threaded  accurately  to 
standard  gauges  and  perfect  in  lead.  Heads 
turned  true  with  body,  very  convenient  in  close 
corners  and  greatly  improves  the  appearance  of 
any  machine.   Write  for  circular  and  free  samples. 

The  Allen  Mfg.  Company 


HARTFORD 


CONN. 


U.S.A. 


Save  One  out  of  five  cars 


Save   every    ounce 
of  coal! 

I  Coal  i.s  worth  almost  its  weight  in 

I  gold.     No  other  economy  in  a  plant 

I  to-day    compares   with    saving   coal. 

I  You  can  effect  a   marked  saving —  _ 

I  users  say  20% — by  utilizing  every  heat  unit  1 

j  of  your  steam  with  the  g 

I  IZ>«adt4ffBoiieF4>  | 

I  SYSTEM  I 

I  By  getting  the  value  of  every  heat  unit  you  J 

I  do  not  have  to  u^e  as  much  coal — and  the  g 

I  efficiency  of  your  plant  is  increased  as  well.  g 

I  There  is  a  MOREHEAD  SYSTEM  that  | 

i  will  fit  your  requirements.     Let  us  give  you  g 

1  further  information  and  prices.  § 

I  Canadian  Morehead  Mfg.  Company  | 

i  Dept.    "L"  = 

1  Woodstock,  Ontario  E 

i  417  = 

liiiiiiiliiiiiliiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiliiilili|{|iiiliiii:iiliiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiio^ 


miu 


The  Machines  that  put 

the  ^* Rings**  in  Springs! 

More  Than  Forty  Standard  Spring  Making  Machines. 

High-Speed  Automatics  for  Making  Fuse 
and    Small  Arms  Springs. 

Flexible  Metallic  Tube  and  Casing  Coilers. 


Sleeper   &  Hartley,  Inc.,  Worcester,  mass,  and  coaticook,  p.q. 


//  what  you  need  is  not  advertised,    consult   our   Buyers'  Directory  and    Uirite  advertisers   listed  under  proper  heading. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


153 


Canadian  fv  Machiner,y 

UYERS  l/IRECTOHY 


If     wl;£ 


ot    he 


e  us.  anid  we  will  tell  you  where  to  get  it.  Let  us  suggest  that  you  consult  also 
dex  facing  the  inside  back  cover,  after  having  secured  advertisers*  names  from  this  directory.  The 
esire  may   be  found   in   the  advertising  pages.      This    department    is    maintained    for    the    benefit    and 

convenience  of  our  readers.     The  insertion  of  our  advertisers*    names    under    proper    headings    is    gladly    undertaken,    but 

does   not   become   part   of   an    advertising   contract. 


|i'i'Hi|:iili|ii't!i:i:iiiiiiiiiiii'i!i:iii;iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii|i|!|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^ 


ABRASIVE  MATERIALS 

Aikenhead    Hardware    Co.,    Toronto,    Out 
Baiter  Co.,   Ltd.,  J.    R..   Montreal,  Que. 
Canadian    Fairbanks.'Moree   Co..    Montreal. 
Can.   B.    K.    Morton.    Montreal.   Que. 
Carbonindum  Co..   Niagara   Palls.   N.T. 
Foss   &   Hill   Machy.   Co.,    Montreal. 
Ford-Smith    Mach.    Co..     Hamilton.     Ont. 
Gardner   Machine  Co.,   Beloit,    Wis. 
Norton  Co.,   Worcester.   Mass. 
H.    W.    I'etrie.   Toronlto. 
H.   W.   Petrie,   of  -Montreal,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
ACETYLENE 
Carter    Welding   Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 
Commercial   Acetylene   Welding  Co..    Inc.,   Toronto 
L'Air    Liquide    Society,    Montreal,    Toronto 
Prest-0-Lite  Co..    Inc.,   Toronto,    Ont. 
ACETYLENE    GENERATORS 
Commercial   Acetylene  Weldinc  Co.,    Inc.,  Toronto 
L'Air    Liquide    Society,    Montreal.    Toronto 
Prest-0-Lite  Co..    Inc..    Toronto,    Ont. 
ACCUMULATORS,    HYDRAULIC 
Canadian    Fail  banks-Morse   Co..   Montreal 
Charles    F.    Elmes    Enc    Worlts.    Chicago 
Garlock-WalkeT   Machinery    Co..    Toronto.    Ont. 
NUes-Bement-Pond    Co..    New    Tork 
Smart-Turner   Mach.    Co..    Hamilton.    Ont. 
William    R.    Perrin.    Ltd..    Toronto 
AIR   RECEIVERS 
Can.    Ingersoll-Rand    Co.,    Sherbrooke.    Que. 
The    .Tenckes    Mach.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Sherbrooke,    Que. 
MacKinnon.    Holmes  Co..    Sherbrooke.    One. 
.St.    L,n«Tv.nrf.   Welding  Co..    Montreal.    Que. 
AIR  WASHERS 
Can.    Blower  &   Forge  Co.,   Kitchener,  Ont. 
Sheldons.    Ltd.,    Gait.    Ont. 
Sturtevant  Co..   B.    F.,    Gait,    Ont, 
ALUMINtTM 
Canada    .Metal    Co..    Toronto 
Tallman    Brass   &    Metal    Co..   Hamilton 
ALLOY,  STEEL 
Can.    B.    K.    Morton.    Toronto,    Montreal 
H.    A.    Dniry   Co..    Ltd..   Montreal 
Hawkridee    Bros.    Co..    Boeton.    .Mass. 
n^bom    (Canada).   Ltd.,   Sam'l.    Monereal.    Que. 
Standard    Alloys    Company,    Pittsburgh,    Pa. 
Vanadi\m    Alloys    Steel    Co.,    Pittsburg,    Pa. 
Vulcan    Crucible    Steel    Co.,    Aliauippa.    Pa. 
ARBORS 
Cana^lian    Fairtauks-Morse   Co.,    Montreal 
Cleveland    Twist    Drill    Co.,    Cleveland 
Oarlock-^'alker   Machinery   Co..    Toronto.    Ont. 

Morse  Twist  Drill  &  iMacb.  Co. .  New  Bedford,  Mass. 

H.    W.    Petrie.    Toronto 

n.    W.    Petrie.    Did..    Montreal 

Pratt    &    Whitney   Co..    Dundas,    Ont. 
AUTOGENOUS    WELDING   AND   CUTTING 
PLANTS 

Carter    Welding   Co.,    Toronto,    Ont. 

L'Air    Liquide    Society,    Montreal,    Toronto 

Prest-O-Lite    Co..    Inc..    Toronto,    Ont 
AUTOMATIC  MACHINERY 

Baitd    .Machine   Co.,    Bridgeport,   Conn. 

Dominion   Machinery  Co.,   Toronto 

Garlock-Walker  Machinery  Co.,    Toronto,   Ont. 

Gardner,  Robt,  &  Son,  Montreal. 

MoClean   &   Son.    F.    W.,    Niagara   Falls,    Ont 

Riverside    Machinery    Depot,    Detroit,    Mich. 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Ltd.,   Montreal 

Pratt    &    Whitney    Co.,    Dundas.    Ont 

Roelofson   Machine   &   Tool  Co.,  Toronto,  Can. 

A.    R.    Williams  .Machy.   Co.,   Toronto 
BABBITT  METAL 

Aikenhead    Hardware   Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 

Baxter  Co.,    Ltd.,   J.    R.,    Montreal,   Que. 

Canadian    Fairbanks-Morse    Co..    Montreal 

Canada    Metal    Co.,    Ltd..   Toronto 

Can.    B.    K.    .Morton,    Toronto,    Montreal 

Foas    &    Hill    Machy.    Co.,    Montreal. 

Hovt    Metal    Co.,    Toronto 

Jobbom,   Geo.    A.,   Hamilton,   Ont 

Mamolia    Metal   Co..    Montreal 

H.    W.    Petrie.    Toronto 

Tallman    Brass    &    Metal    Co..    Hamilton 
BALL   BEARINGS 

Canadian    Fairbanks-Morse   Co..    Montreal 

Can.    S    K    F    Co..   Toronto,    Oujt. 

Chapman   Double   Ball   Bearing  Company,  Toronto 
BARRELS,   STEEL   SHOP 

Baird   Machine  Co..   Bridleport.    Conn. 

Cleveland    Wire    Spring    Co..    Cleveland 
BASE  FACING  MACHINES 

Victoria    Foundry    Co..    Ottawa,    Ont 


BARS,    BORING 

Charies   F.   Elmes  Eng.   Works,  Chicago,   111. 
.Monarch    Brass    Mfg.    Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 
Niles-Bement-Pond    Co.,    New    York 
BELT   LACERS 

Clipper    Belt    Lacer    Co.,    Grand    Rapids,    Mich. 
BELT  DRESSING   AND   CEMENT 

BaxJer  Co.,    Ltd.,    J,    R.,    Montreal,   Que. 
BELT  LACING  LEATHER 
Aikenhead    Haidware    Co.,    Toronto.    Ont 
Foss    ,&    Hill    Machy.    Co.,    Montreal 
Graton    &    Knight   Mfg.    Co.,    Worcester,    Mass. 
BELTING,  BALATA 
Baiter   Co.,    Ltd.,    J.    R.,    Montreal,   Que, 
Can.    B.    K.    Morton.    Toronto,    Montreal 
Federal   Engineering  Co.,   Toronto,   Ont. 
BELTING.   CHAIN 
Canadian    Fairbanks-^Morse   Co.,    Montreal 
Jones   &    Glassco,    Montreal,    Que. 
.Morse   Chain    Co.,    Ithaca,    N.Y, 
H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto 
H.    W.    Petrie,    Ltd.,    Montreal 
Whitney   Mfg.   Co.,    Hartford,   Conn. 
BELTING,   CONVEYOR 

Goodyear  Tire   &    Rubber   Co.,   Toronto,    Ont. 
BELTING,   LEATHER 
Canadian    Fairbanks^.Morse  Co.,    Montreal 
Can.    B.    K.    Jlorton,    Toronto,    -Montreal 
Dominion    Machinery   Co..    Toronilo 
Graton    &    Knight    Mfg.    Co.,    Worcester.    Mass. 
Goodyear  Tire  &  Riibber  Co.,  Toronto,  Ont. 
.McLaren,   J.   C,   Belting  Co..  Montreal.   Que. 
Morse    Chain   Co..    Ithaca.    N.T. 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Ltd.,   Montreal 
Standard  Machy.  &  Supplies,  Ltd.,  iMontreal,  Que 
BELTING,    STITCHED    COTTON   DUCK 
Baiter  Co..    Ltd.,    J.    R..    Montreal.    Que. 
Bennett,    W.    P..  51  Montford  at.,   .Montreal.   Que 
Dominion    Belting    Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Ltd.,    Montreal 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Toronto 
BENCH    LEGS,   STEEL 

New    Britain    Mach.    Co..    New    Britain.    Conn. 
BENCH    DRAWERS,    FRICTIONLFSS 

New    Britain    Mach.    Co..    New    Britan,    Conn. 
BENDING   MACHINERY 
John    Bertram    &    .Sons   Co..    Dundas 
Bertrams,    Limited.    Edinburgh,    -Scotland 
Bliw,    E.    W..    Co.,    Brooklyn.    N.Y. 
Brown-Boggs    Co..    Ltd..    Hamilton,    Can. 
Can.    Blower  &    Forge  Co.,    Kitchener,   Canada 
Dominion    Machinery    Co.,    Toronto 
Ferracute   Mach.    Co..    Bridgeton.    N..T. 
Gartock-Walker    Machinery    Co..    Toronto.    Onl. 
Charles   F.    Elmes   En!:.    Works,   Chicago 
.Tardine,    A.    B.,    &   Co.,    Hespeler.    Onl. 
National    Machinery   Co..    Tiffin.    Ohio 
Niles-Bement.Pond    Co..    New    Tork 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Toronto 
n.    W.    Petrie.    Ltd..    Montreal 
Steel    Bending    Brake    Works.    Chath,am.    Ont. 
Toledo    Machine    &    Tool    Co..    Toledo.    Ohio. 
BILLET  MARKERS 

Matthews.   Jas.   H.,  &  Co.,   Pittsburgh.   Pa. 
BINS,   STEEL 
The    Jenckes    Mach.    Co..    Ltd..    Sherbrooke.    Qu< 
MacKinnon.     Holmes    Co..     Sherbrooke 
Toronto    Iron    Works,    Ltd..    Toronto,    Ont 
BLASTING  MACHINES,  SHOT  AND 
STEEL    GRIT 

Gray    Mfg.    &    Mach.    Co..    Toronto,    Onl, 
BLOWERS 
Can.    Blower   &    Forge   Co..    Kitchener,    Ont 
Sheldons.    Ltd.,    Gait,    Ont. 
Garlook-Walker    Machinery    Co..    Toronto,    Ont. 
H.    W.    Petrie,    Ltd..   Montreal 
R.    E.    T.    Pringle.    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Ont. 
Riverside    Machinery    Depot.    Detroit.    Mich. 
Sturtevant    Co.,    B.    F..    Gait,    Ont 
BLOW  PIPES   AND   REGULATORS     > 
Car'er    Welding    Co..    Toronto.    Ont. 
L'Air   Liquide   Society.    .Montreal.    Toronto 


l.n-I.i 


Ont, 


BUTE  PRINTING  MACHINERY 

Mullinrr-Enlund    Tool    Co..    Syracuse.    NT. 
BOARTZ 

Francis   &   Co..   Hartford,   Conn. 

Geo    A.    .Joyce  Co.,    Ltd.,    New   York,    NY. 
BOILERS 

The    Jenckes    Mach.    Co..    Ltd.,    Shei-hrooke,    Qu 

MacKinnon.     Holmes    Co.,     Sherbrooke 

TT.    W.     Petrie.    Ltd  .    Montreal 

H.    W.    Petrie.    Toronto 

Riverside    Machinerv    D-pot.     Detroit.    Mich, 
BOLT   CUTTERS    AND   NUT   TAPERS 

Aikenhead    Hardware   Co..    Toronto,    Ont 

Canada  Machinery  Corp..   Gait.    Ont. 


Landis  .Machine  Co.,   Waynesboro,   Pa, 

Wells   Brothers   Co,   of  Canada,   Galit,   Ont 
BOLTS 

-Vikenhead   Hardware   Co,,  Toronto,    Ont. 

Cumming  &  Son,  J,  W.,  New  Glasgow,  Canada 

Gait    .Machine    Screw    Co.,    Gait,    Ont 

London  Bolt  &  Hinge  Works,   London,  Ont, 

Steel    Co,    of    Canada,    Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont, 
BOLT  AND  NUT  MACHINERY 

John    Bertram    &    Sona   Co.,    Dundaa 

Canada    Machinery    Corp..    Gait,    Ont. 

Dominion    Machy.    Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 

Garlock-Walker    -Machinery    Co.,    Toronto.    Ont 

Gardner,    Robt,,    &    Son,    -Montreal 

Landis    Machine  Co.,    Waynesboro,    Pa, 

National    Alachinery   Co,,    TilTin,    Ohio. 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Ltd.,    Montreal 

H.    U.    I'etne.    Toronto 

Riverside   Machinery    Depot,    Detroit,    Mich. 

A.    R.    Williams   Machinery  Co.,   Toronto 
BOLT    THREADING    MACHINERY 

Landis    Machine    Co..    Waynesboro,    Pa. 

Victor    Tool    Co.,    Waynesboro,    Pa. 
BORING    MACHINES,    PNEUMATIC 
CYLINDER 

Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.  of  Canada.  Toronto 

Canadian    Fairbanks^Morse  Co.,   Montreal 

Can,     Ingersoll-Rand    Co.,    Sherbrooke,    Que. 

Garlock-Walker    Machinery    Co.,    Toronto,    Out 

H,    W,    Petrie,    Ltd..   Montreal 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto 

Stow    -Mfg.    Co..    Binghamptou.    N.Y. 
BORING    MACHINES,    UPRIGHT    AND 
HORIZONTAL 

John   Bertram   &  Sons  Co.,    Dundas 

Canada   Machinery   Corp,    Gait,    Ont. 

Dominion    Machinery    Co.,    Toronto 

Garlock-Walker    Machinery    Co.,    Toronto,    Ont- 

Hill,    Clarke   &   Co.,    Chicago,    111, 

Xiles-Bement-Pond    Co,,    New    York 

H,    W.    Petrie,    Ltd,,    Montreal 

Roelofson  Machine  &  Tool  Co.,  Toronto,   Ont 

Riverside    Machinery    Depot,    Detroit,    Mich. 

Stow    .Mfg.    Co.,    Binghampton,    N.Y. 
BORING    MACHINES.    STOVE    AND    COAI> 

Cumming   &    Son,    J.    W.,    New    Glasgow,    CanaJ* 
BORING   AND   TURNING   MILLS 

John    Bertram    &    Sons   Co.,    Dundas 

Canada    .Machinery    Corp.,    Gait,    Ont, 

Foss   &   HUl    .Machy.    Co.,    Montreal 

Niles-Bement-Pond    Co. ,    New    York 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Ltd,,    Montreal 

H,    W.    Petrie.    Toronto 

R.    E.    T.    Pringle,    Ltd,,    Toronto,    Ont. 

BOXES.    STEEL    SHOP    AND    TOTE 

Cleveland    Wire    Spring    Co.,    Cleveland 

New   Britain    Mach.   Co.,    New   Britain,   Conn, 
BRAKES 

Brown,    Boggs    &    Co.,    Hamilton,    Can, 
BRASS   AND   COPPER   BARS,   RODS 
A.\D   SHEETS 

Brown's     Copper    &     Brass     Rolling     Mills,     New 
Toronto 
BRASS   WORKING   MACHINERY 

Dominion    Machy.    Co..    Toronto,    Ont. 

Foster    .Machine    Co.,    Elkhart,    Ind, 

Garlock-Walker    Machinery    Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 

Warner    &    Swasey    Co,,    Cleveland 

Niles-Bement-Pond   Co.,    New    York 

H.    W.    Petrie,    L«d,,    Montreal 

'i.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto 

Prest-O-Lite  Co,,    Inc.,   Toronto,    Ont. 

Riverside    Machinerj-    Depot,    Dotroit.    Mich. 

A.    R.    Williams    Machy.    Co.,    Tl.mto 
BRIDGES.   RAILWAY   AND   HIGHWAY 

The    Jenckes    Mach.    Co.,    Ltd..    Sherbrooke.    Q\ie. 

.MacKinnon.     Holmes    Co.,    Sherbrooke 
BRONZE  RODS   AND   SHEETS 

Brown's     Copper     &     Brass     Rolling     Mills.     New 
Toronto 
BUBBLERS 

Puro    Sanitary    Dk'g    Fountain    Co.,    HaydenTUlc 
Maas. 

BUFFING    AND    POLISHING    MACHINERY 

Ford-Snjilh    Mach.    Co.    Hamilton,    Ont, 
Foss    &    Hill    Machy.    Co..    .Montreal 
Garlock-Walker    Machinery    Co.,    Toronto,    Ont. 
New   Britain    Machine  Co.,   New  BriUln,  Oonn, 
H,    W,    Petrie,    Ltd.,    Montreal 
R,    E.    T.    Pringle.    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Ont. 


154 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVII7. 


BUCKETS.  CLAM  SHELL,  CRAB.  DUMP 

Northern    Crane    Works.    Ltd..    Walkerrille.   Ont 

Wliiting   Foundry   Equipment   Co.,    Harvey.    111. 
BUCKETS,   ELEVATING   AND   HOISTING 

Banield,  Edwin  J.,  Toronto. 
BULLDOZERS 

John    Bertram    &    Sons    Co.,    Dundafi. 

E.  W.   Bliss  Co..  Brooklyn.  N.Y. 

Canada    MaclxiueiT  Corp..    Gait.   Ont. 
BURNERS,    OIL   AND    NATURAL   GAS 

Bellevue  Industrial  Furnace  Co..  Detroit,  Mich.  ^ 

Gray   Mfg.   &   Mach.   Co.,  Toronto,   Ont. 

Northern  Crane  Works,   Ltd.,   Walkemlle,  Ont 

Oven  Equipment  &  Mfg.  Co..  New  Haven,  Conn. 
BURRING   REAMERS 

Wells  Bros.  Co.   of  Canada,   Gait,  Ont. 
BURRS,   IRON   AND  COPPER 

Parmenler  &   Bulloch  Co..    Gananoque. 
CANNERS'  MACHINERY 

Bliss.    E.    W.,  Co..   Brooklj-n.   N.\. 

Ferracute  Mach.    Co..   Brideeton.   N.J. 

Brown.  Boggs  &  Co.,  Hamilton.  Can. 

Pre3t-04,ite  Co..   Inc..  Toronto.  Ont. 
CARS.  INDUSTRIAL 

Can    Blower  4;  Forge  Co..   Kitchener.   Can. 

Canadian    Fairbanks-.Morse  Co..    Ltd..  -Montreal. 

Cumming  &  Son,  J.  W.,  New  Glasgow,  Canada. 

The  Jenckea  Mach.   Co.,   Ltd..  Sherbrooke.  Que. 

Marsh   &  genthora,    Belleville.   Ont 

eheldons.   Limited.   Gait.    Onlt. 

Whiting  Foundry   Equipment  Co..   Harvey.    III. 

CAR   MOVERS 

Dillon  Mfg.   Co..    Oshawa,   Ont. 
CARTRIDGE    MAKING   MACHINERY 

Blackall.  Fred.  S..  Woolworth  Tower.  New  York. 
Prest-O-Lite   Co.,    Inc..    Toronto,    Ont 
CASTINGS,  ALUMINUM,  BRASS. 
BRONZE.  COPPER  „       ^ 

Cunming  *  Son.  J.   W.,   New  Glasgow.   Canada. 
Alexander    Fleck.    Ltd..    Ottawa. 
The  Jenokes  Mach.  Co..  Ltd..  Sherbrooke.  Que. 
St.    Lawrence    Weldinc  Co.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Tallman  Brass  &  Metal  Co..  Hamilton. 
CASTINGS.   GRAY   IRON 
Bernard  Industrial  Co.,  The  A..  Fortierville,  Que. 
Brown,   Boggs  Co,,   Ltd.,   Hamilton,  Canada. 
Can.    Steel    Foundries,    Ltd.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Alenander  Fleck,   Ltd.,   Ottawa. 
Gardner,   Uobt,   &  Son,   Montreal.    „  „    ^  _^ 
Hull  Iron  &  Steel  Foundries,   Ltd.,  Hull,  Quebec. 
The  Jenckes  Mach.  Co.,  Ltd..  Sherbrooke.  Que. 
Wm     Kennedy    &   Sons,    Ltd..    Owen   Sound, 
Plesaisville   Foundry  Co.,    PlessisvUIe.    Que. 
eheldons,   Limited.   Gait.   OniU 
CASTINGS,  STEEL  CHROME 
AND    MANGANESE    STEEL 

Can     Steel    Foundries,    Ltd.,    M,0"i'!«"'„i'"*   -   . 
Dominion  Steel  Foundry  Co..  Ltd  .  HwnlltoB.  0»» 
H^l   Iron  &  Steel  Foundries,   Ltd..  Hull.  Quebec. 
Wm     Kennedy   &  Sons,   Ltd..   Owen  Sound. 
CASTINGS.  MALLEABLE 

ran     Steel    Foundries.    Ltd.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Cummiiig  &  Son.  J.   W..  New  Glasgow,  Canada. 
CASTINGS,  NICKEL  STEEL  „,,„„. 

Hull   Iron   &   Steel   Foundries,   Ltd..    Hull.   Que. 
CEMENT   MACHINERY 
Canadian    Fairbanks-Morse    Co..    Dtd..    Montreal. 
Gardner.   Robt.    &  Son,    Montreal. 
H.   W.   Petrie,  Toronto. 
CENTERING    MACHINES 

Victoria    Foundry   Co.,    Ottawa,    Ont 
CENTRE  REAMERS 
John   Bertram  &  Sons  Co.,   Dundas. 
Gardner,    Rdbt.,    &   Son,    Montreal. 
Hurlbut,  Rogers  ilach.  Co..  South  Sudbui7.  Mass. 
Niles-Bement^Pond   Co..   New   York. 
Pratt  &   Whitney  Co..   Dimdas.   Ont. 
Wells   Bros.    Co.    of   Canada.    Gait,    Ont. 
CHAIN    BLOCKS 
Aikenhead  Hardware  Co.,  Toronto,  Ont 
Canadian   FairbankrMorBe  Co.,  Ltd.,    Montreal. 
Ford  Chain  Block  *  Mfg.  Co..  Philadelphia.  Pa. 
Foss  &  HUl  Machj.   Co..  Montreal. 
Garlock-WalkM    Machy.    Co..    Toronto.    Ont. 
H.    W.    Petrie.   Ltd..   Montreal. 
H,   W.    Petrie,   Toronto. 
Wrifht    Mfg.    Co..    Li^on.    Ohio. 
CHEMISTS 
Can.    Inspection   &  Testmg  Lab..   Monjtreal.   Que. 
The   Jenckes   Mach.   Co..    Ltd.,    Sherbrooke,    Que. 
Toronto    Testing    Laboratory,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 
CHESTS.   TOOL 

Union  Tool  Chest  Works.    Rochester,   N.Y. 
CHUCKS,   AERO.   AUTOMATIC 
Garvin  Machine  Co..  New  York. 
Hannifin  Mfg.   Co.,  Chicago,  111, 
CHUCKS,    AIR 
Hannifin    Mfg.    Co..    Chicago.    111. 
Manufacturers  Equipment  Co.,  Chicago.  111. 
CHUCKS.   COLLET 

Hannifin   .Mfg.   Co..   Chicago.   111. 
CHUCKS.  DRILL.   LATHE 
AND   UNIVERSAL 

Aikenhead    Hardware    Co..    Toronto.    Ont. 

John    Bertram    &    Sons   Co..    Dimdas.    Ont 

Can.    Blower   &    Forge   Co..    Kitchener.   Canada. 

Canadian    Fairbanks-Morse   Co..    Ltd..    Montreal. 

Cushman    Chuck    Co..    Hartford.    Conn. 

Foss  &  Hill  Machy.  Co..  Montreal. 

Gardner.   Robt..   &  Son.   Montreal. 

Oarlock-Walker    Machinery  Co.,    Toronto,    Ont. 

Hannifin   Mfg.    Co.,   Chicago.    III. 

Hardinge   Bros..   Chicago.    111. 

Jacobi  Mfg.   Co..   Hartford.  Conn. 

Ker  &  Goodwin.  Brantford. 

Manufacturers    Equipment   Co.,    Chicago.    111. 

Millers  Falls  Co..  Millers  Falls.  Mass. 

Modem  Tool  Co.,  Erie.  Pa. 


Morae   Twist  Drill  &  Machine  Co..   New   Bedford. 
Richmond  Mfg.    Co..   Toronto.    Ont 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Ltd..   Montreal. 
U.    W.    Petrie.   Toronto. 
Skinner  Chuck  Co..  New  Britain,  Conn. 
Thomas  Elevator  Co..  Chicago.    111. 
D,    E.    Whiton   Machine  Co..   New   London,  Conn. 
CHUCKS,    DRILL,   AUTOMATIC 
AND    KEYLESS 
Aikenhead  Hardware  Co.,  Toronto,  Ont 
Can.   Blower  &  Forge  Co.,   Kitchener,  Canada. 
Whitney  Mfg,  Co.,  Hartford,  Conn, 
Richmond   .Mfg.   Co.,   Toronto,   Ont 
CHUCKS.    FRICTION    AND    TAP 
Victor  Tool  Co.,   Waynesboro,    Pa, 
Wells  Bros.   Co.  of  Canada,  Gait,  Ont 
CHUCKS,   GEARED  SCROLL 

Richmond    Mfg.    Co,,    Toronto,    Ont 
CHUCKS,   MAGNETIC 

H.    E.    Streeter,    523   New    Eirks    Bldg.,    Montreal, 
CHUCKS,    RING    WHEEL 
Ford-Smith    Mach.    Co.,    Hamilton.    Ont. 
Gardner  Machine    Co.,   Beloit.   Wis. 
CHUCKS.    SPLIT 

Bivett  Lathe  &  Grinder  Co..  Brighton,  Mass, 
CHUCKING  MACHINES 

Garvin   Machine    Co.,    New    York. 
New  Britain  Machine  Co..  New  Britain.  Conn. 
NilesBement-Pond  Co..    New   York. 
Boelofson  Machine  &  Tool  Co..  Toronto.  Ont 
Warner  &  Swasey  Co..   Cleveland.    O. 
CLOCKS,   WATCHMAN.   PORTABLE 

Hardinge    Bros.,    Inc.,    Chicago,    111. 
CLUTCHES.    FRICTION    AND    PULLEY 
Bernard    Industrial    Co..    A..    Fortierville.    Que. 
Johnson   Machine   Co..  Carlyle.  Manchester.  Conn. 
Positive  Clutch   &    Pulley   Works.    Ltd..   Toronto. 
COAL  HANDLING  MACHINERY 

.MacKinnon.    Holmes   &   Co..    Sherbrooke.    Que. 
Northern  Crane  Works.  Ltd..  Walkerville.  Ont. 
Whiting  Foundry  Equipment  Co..  Harvey.  111. 
COILING   MACHINERY,   WIRE 
AND   SPRING 

Sleeper   &    Hartley.    Inc.,    Worcester,    .Mass. 
COKE  AND  COAL 

Hanna  &   Co..    M.    A.,   Cleveland,    0. 
Zenith   Steel   &  Coal   Products,   Montreal,    Que. 
COLLARS 

Can.   Bond  Hanger  4  lOplg.  Co.,   Alexandria,  Ont. 
COLLECTORS.   PNEUMATIC 

Can.    Blower  &   Forge  Co..    Kitchener.   Ont. 
Sheldons.    Limited,    Gait.    Ont. 
Sturtevant   Co.,    B.    F..    Gait,    Ont 
COLLETS 
Becker   Milling   Machine  Co..    Boston.   Mass. 
Hannifin  Mfg.  Co..  Chicago.  111. 
Hardinge    Bros.,    Inc.,   Chicago.    111. 
Manufacturers'    Equipment    Co..    Chicago.    III. 
Rivett   Lathe   &  Grinder  Co.,   Boston.   Mass. 
Stone   Tool    &    Supply  Co.,   J.    R..    Detroit.   Mich. 
COMPRESSORS.  AIR 

Can.     lugeraoll-Rand    Co..    Sherbrooke.    Que. 
Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.  of  Canada.  Toronto 
CurtLs  Pneumatic  Machy.   Co..   St,    Louis.   Mo. 
Garlock  Walker  Machinery  Co..   Toronto,   Ont 
HincWev    Machine   Co..    Hinckley.    111. 
The   Jenckes    Mach.    Co..    Ltd..    Sherbrooke.    Que. 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Ltd..    Montreal. 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Toronto. 

Riverside    Machinery    Depot.    Detroit.    Mich. 
Smart-Tumer    Machine    Co..    Hamilton.    Ont. 
Taylor    Instrument    Co.,    Rochester,    N.Y. 
CONTROLLERS    AND   STARTERS. 
ELECTRIC   MOTORS 

Dominion   Machy.   Co..  Toronto,    Ont. 
H.    W.    Petrie,   Toronto. 
R     B.    T.    Pringle.    Ltd..   Toronto.    Ont 
A.    R.   Williams  Machy.   Co..   Toronto. 
CONTROLLING  INSTRUMENTS 

Ta.vlor    IrMtniment    Co..    Rochester.    N.Y. 
CONVERTERS.    STEEL   SLIDE-BLOW 

WWting    Foundry    Equipment   Co..    Harvey.    III. 
COPING  MACHINES 

Can.    Blower  A   Forge  Co..   Kitchener.   Ont 

John    Bertram   *   .''ons   Co..    Dundas. 
Niles-Bemen't-Pond   Co..    New   York. 
COUNTERBORES    AND    COUNTERSINKS 
.^.ikenhead   Hardware  Co.,    Toronto.   Ont. 
Clark    Equipment    Co..    Buchanan.    .Mich. 
Cleveland   Twist   Lrill   Co..   Cleveland.    , 
Morie  Twist  Drill  &  Machine  Co..  New  Bedford. 
Pratt   &   Wllitney  Co..   Lundas.  Ont. 
COUNTERSHAFTS 

Baird   Machine  Co.,    Bridgeport.   Conn. 
Poster   Machine   Co..    Elkhart.    Ind. 
atJiw    Mfg.    Co..    Binchampton,    N.Y. 
COUPLINGS.   FRICTION 

Bernard   Industrial  Co..  The  A.,   Fortierville.  Que, 
COUPLINGS.    PLAIN    AND    FLEXIBLE 

Can.    Bond  Hanger  &  Oplg.  Co..   Alexandria.  Ont 
Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.  of  Canada.  Toronto. 
Gardner,    Robt..    &   Son,    Montreal. 
Independent  Pneumatic  Tool  Co..  Chicago.   Til. 
*  CRANES.    LOCOMOTIVE 

Northern  Crane   Works.   Walkerille. 
CRANES,   GANTRY 

Northern   Crane   Works,    Walkerville. 
Smart-Turner   Machine   Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont 
Whiting    Foimdry    Equipment   Co.,    Harvey,    111. 
CRANES,    GOLIATH    AND    PNEUMATIC 
Northern   Crane   Works,    Walkerville. 
Whiting  Foundry  Equipment  Co..  Hai/ey.  111. 
CRANES.    TRAVELLING,    ELECTRIC 
AND    HAND   POWER 
Curtis  Pneumatic   Machy.  Co..  St   Louis.  Mo. 
Dominion    Bridge    Co.,    Montreal. 
Hepburn,  John  T.,  Ltd,,  Toronto,  Ont 
Niles-Bement-Pond    Co..    New   York. 
Northern    Crane   Works,    Walkerville. 


CRANES.   PORTABLE 

Aikenhead   Hardware  Co.,   Toronto,   Ont, 
Northern    Crane    Works,    Walkei-ville. 
Wliiting  Foundry  Equipment  Co.,  Harvey.   III. 
CRIMPS,    LEATHER 

Graton  &   Knight  Mfg.  Co..   Worcester.   Mass. 
CUPOLAS 
Can.    Blower   &   Forge  Co..    Kitchener.   Ont 
Northern  Crane  Works.   Walkeiville. 
H.    W.    Petrie.   Toronto. 
Sheldons,    Ltd.,    Gait,    Ont 

Whiting    Foimdry    Equipment    Co..    Harvey.    111. 
CUPOLA    BLAST    GAUGES   &    BLOWERS 

Sheldons.   Ltd..    Gait,   Ont. 
CUTTER    GRINDERS    AND    ATTACHMENTS 
Cincinnati   Milling  Machine   Co..    Cincinnati. 
Garlock-WalUer  Machinery  Co..   Toronto,    Ont 
Gan'in  Machine  Co.,  New  Yoik. 
Monarch  Brass  .Mfg.  Co.,  Toronto,  Ont, 
Norton   Grinding  Co.,    Worcester,    Mass, 
H.   W.    Petrie.   Ltd..  Montreal. 
CUTTERS,    FLUE 

Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co,  of  Canada,  Toronto 
CUTTERS.    PIPE     (SEE    PIPE    CUTTERS) 
CUTTERS,    MILLING 
Becker  Milling   Machine  Co,,   BoetoQ,  Mass, 
Canadian     Fairbanks-Morse    Ca,    Ltd..    Montreal. 
Cleveland  .Milling  .Mach.   Co.,  Cleveland,  Ohio. 
Cleveland   Twist    Drill   Co.,   Cleveland, 
Dominion  Machy,  Co.,  Toronto,  Odt. 
Foes  &  Hill  Machinery  Co..  Montreal. 
Garvin   Machine  Co.,  New   York. 
Goddard  Tool  Co..  Chicago.   111. 
Illinois  Tool  Works.  Chicago,  111. 
.Morse    Twist    DrUl    &    Mach.    Co.,    New    Bedford, 

.Mass. 
Osbom   (Canada),  Ltd.,  Sam'l,   Montreal,  Que. 
H.    W.    Petrie,   Ltd,,   Montreal, 
H.  W.   Petrie.  Toronto. 
Pratt  &  Whitney  Co..    Dundas.   Ont 
Tabor  .Mfg.  Co.,   Philadelphia.    Pa. 
Whitney  Mfg.  Co..  Hartford.  Conn. 
CUTTING   COMPOUND   AND  CUTTING   OIL 
Cataract    Refining   &    Mfg.    Co..    Toronto. 
Elm  Cutting  Oil  Co..  Toronto. 
Racine   Tool   &   .Machine  Co..    Racine.    Wis. 
CUTTING-OFP  MACHINES 

Armstrong  Bros.   Tool  Co.,  Chicago. 
John   Bertram   &   Sons   Co.,   Dundas. 
Canadian    Fairbanks-.Morse    Co..    Ltd..    Montreal. 
Curtis    &   Curtis    Co..    Bridgeport.    Conn. 
FosB  &   Hill  Machinery  Co.,   Montreal. 
Gait  &   Walker  Machinery   Co..   Toronto.   Ont 
Garlock-Walker  Machinerj'  Co.,   Toronto,   Ont 
Garvin   Machine   Co.,    New   York. 
Huribnt,  Rogers  Machy.  Co.,  South  Sudbury,  Maaa 
John  H.   Hall  &  Sons,   Brantford.  Ont. 
Wm.    Kennedy    &  Sons.    Owen   Sound.    Ont 
Peertess  Machine  Co..   Racine.  Wis. 
n.   W.   Petrie,  Ltd.,   Montreal, 
H.   W.    Petrie,  Toronto. 
Presto-Lite  Co,,    Inc.,   Toronto,    Ont 
Racine  Tool  &  Machine  Co.,  Racine,  Wis. 
Standard   Mchv.   &  Supplies.  Ltd..  Montreal.   Que. 
Tabor  Mfg.   Co..   Philadelphia,    Pa. 
CYLINDERS,    AIR 

MHniif.icturtrs    Eqiiipmrnt   Co..    Chicago,    111. 
CYLINDERS.    AUTOMATIC   REBORING  JIGS 
AND    REAMERS 

Hinckley    .Machine   Co.,    Hinckley,    III. 
CUTTING    AND    WELDING    PLANTS 

Prest-Od-ite   Co..    Inc.,    Toronto,    Ont. 
DAMPER   REGULATORS 

Canadian    Fairbanks-Morse   Co..    Ltd..    Blontreal. 
DERRICKS 

Aikenhead    Hardware   Co..    Toronto.    Ont 
Dominion   Bridge   Co..    Montreal. 
Winnipeg    Gear   &    Engr.    Co..    Wipnipeg.    Man. 
DIAMONDS,    BLACK    AND   ROUGH 

Geo,   A.  Joyce  Co.,  Ltd,,   New  York. 
DIAMOND   TOOLS 

Francis  &   Co.,   Hartford.   Conn. 
Geo.   A.   Joyce  Co..   Ltd..   New  York. 
Wheel   Trueing  Tool  Co..   Windsor.   Ont. 
DIES.   BRASS   PRINTING.   EMBOSSING 
AND    LETTERING 

Matthews,  Jas.    H.,   &  Co.,    Pittsburgh,   Pa. 
DIES   AND  DIE  STOCKS 

Aikenhead   Hardware  Co..   Toronto,   Ont. 

BanflelJ.    W.    H.,   &  Son,    Toronto. 

Butterfield  &  Co..  Rock  Island.  Que. 

Brown.  Boggs  Co..  Hamilton.  Ont 

Canadian  Fairiianks-Morse  Co..  Montreal. 

Foss  &   Hill   Machy.    Co.,   Montreal. 

Gardner,   Robt,  &  Son.   Montreal. 

A.   B.  Jsrdine  &  Co.,  Hespeler,   Ont 

Landis   Machine    Co..    \Va^-nesboro,    Pa. 

Modem  Tool  Co.,   Erie,    Pa. 

Morse   Twist   Drill   &    Mach,   Co..    New    Bedford. 

h!   W.   Petrie,  Ltd..    Montreal. 

H.    W.   Petrie,  Toronto. 

Pratt  &  Whitney  Co..  Dundas,  Ont 

Rickert-Shafer  Co..   Erie,   Pa. 

Standard   Machy.   &   Supplies,   Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Wells  B'oth-rs  of  Oanaaa.  Gait   Ont 
DIES    FOR    BIT    BRACE    USE 

Wells    Brothers    Co.    of    Canada,    Gait,    Ont. 
DIES,    NOSING 

Marsh    &    Henthom.    Ltd..    Belleville,    Ont 
DIES.   PIPE  THREADING 

Landis    Machine    Cr..    WavneshoTO.    Pa. 
DIE    SINKERS 

Becker    Milling    Machine    Co..    Boston.    .Mass. 

Garvin   Machine  Co..   New  York. 

H.    W.    Petrie.   Ltd.,    .Montreal. 
DIES   FOR   MACHINES 

Aikenhead    Hardware    Co..   Toronito.    Ont 

Landis    Machine    Co-.    Wa>"ne.sboro.    Pa. 

Wells    Brothers    Co.    of    Canada.    Gait,    Ont. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    M  A  C  H I N  K  R  Y 


155 


Two  Handy  Levers 
Give  the  Correct 
Turret  Feed 
for  Each 
Operation 
on  this  Piece. 


Turret   Feed   Change    Le 


The  simple  movement  of  one  or  both 
of  these  levers  is  all  that  is  required  to 
get  the  mo.?t  productive  feed  for  each 
turret  operation,  eight  feeds  in  geo- 
metrical progi'ession  being  instantly 
available  for  eacli  spindle  speed. 

Practically  no  more  effort  is  required 
to  use  the  correct  feed  for  each  opera- 
tion than  to  use  the  same  feed  for  the 
entire  seven  tools. 

This  "tvarret -slide-feed"  feature  is  but 
one  of  many  points  that  make  for 
handines.~  and  consequentlv  FAST 
PRODUCTION  on 


Brown  &  Sharpe  Nos.  4  and  6  Wire  Feed  Screw  Machines 


BROWN  &  SHARPE  MFG.  CO. 

Providence,  R.I.,  U.S.A. 


Canadian  Representative: 
CANADIAN  FAIRBANKS  MORSE  CO. 


The 


B            yU 

s.      D 

A     JP 

J      ^ 

R      'T^ 

N       ^M 

L 

E       % 

f     L 

S     ^ 

^      S 

Complete  line.      8-inch 

to  50-inch  swing 

Gang  Drills. — Horizontal  Drills. 

SEND  FOR  CATALOG. 

W.  F.  &  JOHN  BARNES  CO. 

104  Ruby  Street  -  ROCKFORD,  ILL. 

Canadian  Agent.— A.  R.  WILLIAMS  MACHINERY  CO. 

Toronto,  Winnipeg,  Vancouver,  and  St.  John,  N.B. 

WILLIAMS  &   WILSON,  Montreal 


An  Aurora  Will  Not  Do  It 


What? — poor  work,  increase  cost,  fall  down  in  the  pinch.  An 
Aurora  Drill  has  built  a  reputation  on  its  strength,  speed  and 
accuracy.  Ideal  for  work  on  H.E.  Shells,  or  work  of  similar 
nature.  Stationary  head  sizes.  20",  21".  Sliding  head  sizes 
22",    44".      An    inquiry    will   secure   immediate    information. 

THE  AURORA  TOOL  WORKS 

Aurora         ,„,  „,„n.  Ind.,  U.S.A. 


//   any  advertisement   interests   you,   tear  it    out   now   and   place    with  letters  to  bf  answered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


DIE  SINKING  PRESSES.  HYDRAULIC 

Charles   F.    Elmea   Eng.    Works,   Chicago. 
DIES,  SELF-OPENING 

Eastern  Mach.  Screw  Corp.,  New  Haven,  Conn. 

Geometric  Tool  Co.,  New  Haven. 

Ideal  Tool   &  -Mfg.   Co.,   Beaver   Falls,   Pa, 

Landi^  Machine  Co.,  WajTiesboro,  Pa. 

Modem  Tool  Co.,  Erie,  Pa. 

Murohey  Machine  &   Tool  Co.,   Detroit,   Mich. 

Wells   Brothels   Co.    of  Canada,   Gait.   Ont. 
DIES  FOR  SCREW  PLATES 

Wells  Brothers  Co.   of  Canada,   Gait,  Ont 
DIES,   SHEET  METAL  WORKING 

E.   \V.    Bliss  Co.,   Brooklyn,  N.Y. 

Brown,  Boggs  &  Co.,  Hamilton,  Canada. 

Worth    Engineering  Co.,    Toronto,    Ont, 
DISCS,   LEATHER 

Gratou  &  Knight  Mfg.  Co.,  Worcester,  Ma3& 
DIES,  SCREW   AND  THREAD 

Landis  .Machine  Co.,  W^aynesboro,   Pa. 

.Modem  Tool   Co.,   Erie,    Pa. 

Muwhey   Machine  &  Tool  Co.,   Detroit,  Mich. 

National-Acme    Co.,     Cleveland,     Ohio, 

Wells   Brothers  Co.    of  Canada,    Gait,   Ont 
DRAFT,  MECHANICAL 

W.    H.    Banfleld  &  Sons,   Toronto. 

Buttertield  &   Co.,  Kock   Island,  Que. 

Can.    Blower    &    Foi-ge   Co.,    Kitchener,    Ont 

A.  B.  Jaidine  &  Co.,  Hespeler,  Ont 
Pratt  &  Whitney  Co.,   Dundas,   Ont. 
Sheldons,   Ltd.,   Gait,   Ont 
Sturtevant  Co.,    B.    F.,   Gait,   Ont 

DISCS,   LEATHER 

Graton   &   Knight  Mfg.    Co.,   Montreal. 
DRESSERS,    GRINDING    AND    EMERY 
WHEEL 

Can.   DesmondjStephan  Mfg.  Co.,  Hamilton,  Ont 

Ford-Smith   Mach.   Co.,  Hamilton,   Ont 
DRILL  PRESSES 

Aurora   Tool   Works,    Aurora,    Ind. 

W.    F.    &  John  Barnes  Co.,   Rockford. 

Can.    Blower   &   Forge  Co.,    Kitchener,   Ont 

Canada  Machinery   Corp.,    Gait,    Ont 

Dominion  Machy.   Co.,  Toronto,  Ont 

Foss  &  Hill  Machy.  Co.,  Montreal. 

Garlock-Walker   Machinery  Co.,   Toronto,    Ont 

Garvin  Machine  Co.,  New  York. 

Niles-Bement-Pond   Co.,   New   York. 

Pctrie  of  Montreal,  LU.,  H.  W.,  Montreal,  Que. 

H.   W.    Petrie,  Toronto. 

B.  E.   T.   Pringle,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  Ont 
Riverside  'Machinery  Depot,   Detroit,  Mich. 
Standard  Machy.  &  Supplies,  Ltd.,  Montreal, 
tjtow    Mfg.    Co..    Binghampton,    N.Y. 

United  States  Mach.  Tool  Co.,  Cindnnali,   O. 
A.  R.  Williams  Machinery  Co..  Toronto. 
DRILLING   MACHINES,  BENCH 
BUton  Mach.   Tool  Co.,  Bridgeport,  Conn. 
Martin  .Machine  Co.,  Greenfield,  Mass. 
DRILLING  MACHINES.   GANG 

Barnes,   W.   F.   &  John,  Co.,   Rockford,   111. 
Bilton   .Mach.   Tool  Co.,   Bridgeport,  Conn. 
Canada   .Machinery  Corp.,  Gait,   Ont 
Silver  .Mfg.   Co.,   Salem^   Ohio. 
DRILLING    MACHINES.    LOCOMOTIVE 
AND  MULTIPLE  SPINDLE 
John  Bertram  &  Sons  Co.,  Dundas. 
Bilton  Mach.   Tool  Co..   Bridgeport,  Conn, 
Can.    Blower  &   Forge  Co.,    Kitchener.  Ont 
Canada  Machinery  Corp.,  Gait,  Ont 
Canadian    Fairbanks-Morse  Co.,    Montreal. 
Cincinnati   Pulley  Machy.   Co.,  Cincinnati,   Ohio, 
Dominion   Machy.  Co.,  Toronto,   Ont 
Foss  &  Hill  Machy.   Co.,  Montreal. 
Fox  Machine  Co.,  Jackson,  Mich 
Garlock-Walker  Machinery  Co.,  Toronto,   Ont 
Garvin  Machine  Co.,  New  York. 
A.    B.    Jardine   &  Co.,    Hespeler,    Ont 
National-Acme  Co..  Cleveland,  Ohio. 
Nilec-Bement-Pond  Co.,    New    York. 
Petrie  of  -Montreal,  Ltd.,  H.   W.,  Montreal.  Que. 
H.  W.   Petrie.  Toronto. 
Rockford  Drilling  uMach.  Co.,  Rockford,  III. 
DRILLING  MACHINES, 
RADIAL   AND  TURRET 
John  Beitram  &  Sons  Co..  Dundas. 
Canadian    FairbanksnMorse    Co..    Montreal. 
Canada    Machinery  Corp.,    Gait,    Ont. 
Dominion   Machy.   Co.,   Toronto,    Ont. 
Garlock-Walker  Machinery  Co.,   Toronto,   Ont 
Henry  &  Wright  Mfg.  Co.,  Hartford,  Conn, 
Hill,    Claike   &    Co..    Chirago,    111. 
Niles-Bement-Pond   Co.,    New    York. 
H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto. 
DRILLING    MACHINES.    SENSITIVE 
Aikenhe.ad  Hardware  Co.,   Toronto.  Ont 
Bilton  Mach.  Tool  Co.,   Bridgeport,  Conn. 
W.  F.  &  John  Barnes  Co.,  Rockford,  111. 
Canadian   Fairbanks-Morse  Co.,   Montreal, 
Canada   Machinery  Corp.,  Gait,   Ont 
De  Mooy  Machine  Co.,  Cleveland.   Ohio. 
Foss  c&  Hill   .Machy.   Co.,   Montreal. 
Garlock-Walker   Machinery  Co.,   Toronto.    Ont 
Henry  &  Wright  Mfg.  Co.,  HarMord,  Conn. 
D.    McKenzie   Machinery  Co.,   Guelph,    Ont 
Niles-Bement-Pond  Co.,   New   York. 
R.    E.    T.    Pringle,    Ltd.,   Toronto,   Ont. 
iStow    .Mfg.    Co..    Binghampton.    N.Y. 
United  States  Mach.   Tool  Co.,   Cincinnati,  Ohio. 
DRILLING   MACHINES,   UPRIGHT 
AND  HORIZONTAL 

Aurora   Tool   Works,    Aurora,    Ind. 

John   Bertram  &  Sons  Co.,   Dimdas. 

Can.    Blower  &   Forge  Co.,    Kitchener,   Ont 

Canada   Machinery  Corp.,   Gait,  Ont. 

Cincinnati   Pulley  Machy.    Co.,   Cincinnati,   Ohio. 

Dominion   Machy.  Co.,  Toronto,   Onx. 

Garlock-Walker   Machinery   Co.,    Tofmito^-Oht 

A.    B.   Jardine   &  Co.,   Hespeler,    Ont. 

R.    McDougaU  Co.,   GiTt- 

Niles-Bement-Pond    Co.,    New    York. 

Petrie  of  Montreal,  Ltd.,  H.   W.,   Montreal,  Que. 


H.    W.    Petrie,   Toronto. 

Rockford   Drilling  Mach.    Co.,    Rockford,    111. 

Silver  Mfg.   Co.,  Salem,   Ohio. 

A.  R.    Williams    Machinery   Co.,    Toronto. 
DRILLING   POSTS 

Aikenhead    Hardware   Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 
Keystone    Mfg.    Co.,    Buffalo,    N.Y. 
Silver  Mfg.  Co.,   Salem,  Ohio. 
DRILLS,   BENCH 
Aikenhead   Hardware  Co.,    Toronto.    Ont 
W.    F.   &  John  Barnes  Co.,   Rockford,   111. 
Can.    Blower   &    Forge    Co..    Kitchener.   Ont 
Canadian   Fairhanks^orae  Co.,   Montreal. 
Cincinnati  PiUIey  Machy,   Co..  Cincinnati,   Ohio. 
Foss    &    Hill    Machy.    Co.,    Montreal. 
Garlock-Walker  Machinery   Co..   Toronto,    Ont 
MUIers    Falls   Co.,    MUIere    Falls,    Mass. 
H.    W.    Peine,    Ltd.,    Montreal, 
fratt   &   Whitney   Co.,   Dundas,    Ont 

B.  E,    T.    Pringle.    Ltd..    Toronto,    Ont 
United  States  Electrical  Tool  Co.,  Cincinnati. 

DRILLS,   BLACKSMITH   AND   BIT   STOCK 
Aikenhead    Hardware    Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 
Can.    Blower   &    Forge    Co.,    Kitchener,    Ont 
Cleveland  r»-ist  Drill  Co.,  Cleveland. 
Foss    &   HUl    Machy.    Co.,    Montreal. 
A.    B.   Jaidine   &   Co.,   Hespeler,    Ont. 
Moi^e  Twist  Drill  &  Machine  Co.,  New  Bedford. 
Petrie  of  Montreal,   Ltd.,  H.   W.,   Montreal,  Que. 
H.   W.    Petrie,   Toronto. 
DRILLS.   CENTRE 
Aikenhead   Hardware  Co..    Toronto,    Ont 
Cleveland    Twist    Drill    Co.,    Cleveland. 
Morse  Twist  Drill  &  Machine  Co.,  New  Bedford. 
DRILLS,  ELECTRIC  AND   PORTABLE 
Aikenhead    Hardware   Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 
Can.    Blower  &   Forge   Co.,    Kitchener,   Out 
Cincinnati   Electrical   Tool   Co.,   Cincinnati,  Ohio. 
Dominion  Machy.   Co.,  Toronto,   Ont 
Foss   &  Hill    .Machy,   Co.,   Montreal. 
Independent  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.,   Chicago. 
Niles-Bement-Pond   Co.,   New   York, 
H.    W.    Petrie,    Ltd..    Montreal. 
H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto. 
Prest-OiLite   Co.,    Ina,   Toronto,    Ont 
R.    E.    T.    Pringle,    Ltd.,    Toronto.    Ont 
Stow    Mfg.    Co.,    Binghamton,    N.Y. 
United   States  Electrical  Tool  Co.,  Cincinnati 
A.    B.    Williams    Machinery    Co.,    Toronto, 
DRILLS.  HIGH  SPEED 
Aikenhead    Hardware    Co,,    Toronto,    Ont. 
Atkins   &   Co..    Wm..    Sheffield.    Eng. 
Cleveland   Twist   Drill    Co.,    Cleveland. 
Canadian  Fairbanks^Morse  Co.,  Montreal. 
Clark  Equipment  Co.,   Burhanan,  Mich. 
Can.    B.    K.  iMorton.  Toronto,   Slontreal. 
H.    A.    Dmry  Co..   Montreal. 
Eagle   &   Globe  Steel   Co.,    Montreal,   Que. 
Foss  &  Hill  Machy.  Co.,  Montreal. 
Maishall    &    Co.,    Geo.    A.,    Toronto.    Ont 
McKenna  Brothera.  Pittsburgh.  Pa. 
Morse    Twist   Drill   &    Mach.    Co.,    New    Bedferd, 

Mass. 
Osbom  (Canada).  Ltd.,  Sam'l.  Montreal.  Que. 
W.  P.  &  John  Barnes  Co.,  Rockford,  111. 
H.    W.    Petrie,   Toronto. 
Pratt    &   Whitney  Co..   Dunda.s.   Ont 
Standard    Machv.  &  Supplies,    Ltd..  Montreal.  Que. 
DRILLS.   MULTIPLE   SPINDLE 

Henry  &   Wright  Mfg.  Co..   Hartford,   Conn. 
NilesBement-Pond   Co.,   Neiw  York. 
H.  W.  Petrie.  Ltd..  Montreal. 
Oarlock-Walker    Machinery   Co..    Toronto.    Ont. 
Pratt    &  Waiitnev   Co..   Dundas,  Ont 
DRILLS.  OIL  TUBE  ' 

Cleveland    Twist    Drill    Co.,    Cleveland. 
Morse    Twist    Drill   &    Mach.    Co.,    New   Bedford, 
Mass. 
DRILLS.   PNEUMATIC 
Can.    Incersoll-Rand    Co..    Sherbrooke,   Que. 
Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.  of  Canada,  Toronto. 
Independent   Pneumatic  Tool   Co..   Chicago,   111. 
The  Jenckes   Mach.    Co.,    Ltd..    .Shertjrooke.   Que. 
Nile"!  Bement-Pond   Co..   New  York. 
R.    E.    T.    Pringle.    Ltd..    Toronto,    Ont. 
DRILLS.  PNEUMATIC  CORNER 
Can.    Ingersoll-Band    Co..    Sherbrooke,    Que. 
Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.  of  Canada.  Toronto. 
Garlock-Walker    Machinery    Co..    Toronto,    Out 
Independent    Pneumatic    Tool   Co..    Chicago.    III. 
DRILLS.   RATCHET  AND   HAND 
Aikenhead    Hardware  Co.,    Toronto.    Ont, 
.\mistrong   Bros.    Tool   Co.,    Chicago,    111. 
Can.    Blower  &   Forge  Co.,   Kitchener,   Ont 
Canadian  Fairbanks^Morse  Co.,   Montreal. 
Cincinnati   Electrical  Tool   Co.,    Cincinnati,   Ohio. 
Cleveland   Twist   Drill   Co.,    Cleveland. 
Garlock-Walker  Machinery   Co.,    Toronto,    Ont. 
A.    B.    Jardine    &   Co.,    Hespeler,    Ont 
MiUers    Falls    Co.,    Millers    Falls,    Mass. 
Morse  Twist  Drill  &  Mach.   Co.,  New  Bedford. 
H.   W.   Petrie,   Ltd.,  Montreal, 
H.   W.    Petrie.  Toronto. 
Pratt   &  Whitney   Co.,   Dundas,   Ont 
DRILLS,  ROCK 
Can.    IngersoU-Rand   Co..    Sherbrooke,   Que. 
Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.  of  Canada.  Toronto, 
Dominion  Machy.   Co.,  Toronto. 
Foss  &  Hill  Machy.  Co.,  Montreal. 
The   Jenckes   Mach.    Co.,    Ltd.,   Sherbrooke,   Que. 
A.  R,   Williams  Machy.  Co.,  Toronto. 
DRILLS,  TRACK 
Cleveland  Twist  Drill  Co.,   Cleveland. 
CI.irk    Equipment    Co..    Buchanan,    Mich, 
Foss  &    Hill   Machy.   Co..    Montreal. 
Morse  Twist    Drill   &   Mach.   Co..    New   Bedford. 
DRILLS,    TWIST 
.\tkins   &   Co.,    Wm..    Sheffield,   Eng. 
."Aikenhead   Hardware  Co..    Toronto,   Ont. 
Armstrong    Bros.    Tool    Co..    Chicago. 
.Armstrong,  Whitworth  of  Canada,  Ltd.,  Montreal. 
Canadian   Fairbanks-Morse  Co.,  Montreal. 
Can.   1>.    K.   -Morton.  Toronto,  Montreal. 
Clar!:   Kiuipmenl   Co.,    Buchanan,   Mich. 


Cleveland  Twist  Drill  Co.,   Cleveland. 
Morse   Twist   Drill   &   Mach.    Co.,   New   Bedford. 
Osbom    CCanada),    Ltd.,    Sam'l,    .Montreal,    Que. 
H.    W.    Petrie,  Toronto. 
Pratt  &   Whitney  Co.,    Dundas,    Ont 
Whitman   &    Barnes    Mfg.  Co.,  St.  Catharines,  Ont 
DRINKING   FOUNTAINS 
Puro    Sanitary    Dk'fi.    Fountain    Co.,    HaydenviJle, 
Mass, 
DRYING  APPLIANCES 

Baird   .Machine    Co..    Bridgeport,    Conn. 
Sheldons,    Ltd.,    Gait,    Ont 
R.    E.    T.    Pringle,    Ltd.,   Toronto.   Ont. 
DUMP  CARS 
Canadian   Fairbanks^Morse  Co.,   Montreal. 
The  Jenckes  Mach.   Co.,   Ltd.,  Sherbrooke.  Que. 
MacKinnon,  Holmes  &  Co.,  Sherbrooke,   Que. 
DUST   SEPARATORS 
Can.    Blower  &   Forge  Co.,   Kitchener,   Ont 
Sheldons,   Ltd.,   Gait,    Ont 
Sturtevant  Co.,    B.    P..    Gait    Ont 
DUST  ARRESTERS    (FOR  TUMBLING 
MILLS) 
Northern  Crane  Works,   Walkerville. 
Sheldons,    Ltd.,    Gait,    Ont 
Sturtevant  Co.,   B.   F.,   Gait.  Ont 
Whiting  Foundry  Equipment  Co..  Harvey,   lU. 
DYNAMOS   AND   ELECTRICAL 
SUPPLIES 
Canadian   Faii'banks-iMorse   Co.,    Montreal. 
Dominion   Machy.   Co.,   Toronto.   Ont 
Lancashire   DjTiamo  &  Motor  Co.,   Ltd..  Toronto. 
Petrie  of   Montreal,    Ltd.,    H.    W.,    Montreal,    Que. 
Standard   Machy.    &    Supplies,  Utd.,  Montreal,  Que. 
Pratt  &   Whitney  Co.,    Dundas,    Ont 
A,    B.    Williams  .Machy.    Co.,  Toronto. 
ELEVATOR  ENCLOSURES 

Canada    Wire   &   Iron   Goods   Co..   Hamilton,   Ont 
ELEVATORS   AND   BUCKETS 
Curtis  Pneumatic  .Machy.   Co.,  St  Louis,  Mo, 
Whiting    Foinidry   Equipment   Co,,    Harvey.   111. 
ELEVATING   AND    CONVEYING 
MACHINERY 

Banfleld,    Edwin   J.,   Toronto. 

Can.  Matthews  Gravity  Carrier  Co.,   Toronto,  Ont. 
EMERY  GRINDERS   (PNEUMATIC) 

Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.  of  Canada,  Toronto. 
Stow    Mfg.    Co.,    Binghamton,   N.Y. 
EMERY  AND  EMERY  WHEELS 
FosH  &  Hill  Machy.   Co.,   Montreal. 
Garvm  Machine  Co.,  New  York, 
Canadian    Fairbanks^Morse   Co.,    Montreal. 
Ford-Smith  Mach.   Co.,   Hamilton,    Ont 
Francis  &   Co.,   Hartford,   Conn, 
Norton  Co.,   Worcester.   .Mass. 
H.   W.   Petrie,  Ltd.,  Montreal, 
H.  W,   Petrie,  Toronto. 
It.    E.    T.    Pringle,    Ltd..    Toronto,    Ont 
Standard  .Machy.   &  Supplies,  Ltd.,  Montreal,  Que, 
ENGINES,   BALANCED   VALVE 
The  Jenckes   Mach.    Co.,    Ltd.,   Sherbrooke,   Quo. 
Plcssisville    Foundry    Co. ,    PleasisviUe,    Que. 
ENGINES,  STEAM,  GAS.  GASOLINE 
Canadian    Fairbanks^Moise    Co..    Montreal, 
Johnson  Macli.   Co.,   Carlyle,   Manchester,  Conn. 
H.    W.    I'etiie,    Toronto. 

Uivcrside    Machinery    Depot,    Detroit,    Mich. 
ENGINES,    HORIZONTAL 
AND   VERTICAL 
The  Jenckes  .Mach.   Co.,   Ltd.,  Sherbrooke,  Que. 
Johnson  iMach.   Co.,  Cariyle,   Manchester.   Conn. 
H.    W.    Petrie,   Ltd.,  Montreal, 
H,    W.    Petrie,    Toronto. 
Sheldons,    Ltd.,    Gait,    Ont. 
A,    B.    Williams   Machy.   Co.,   Toronto. 
ENGRAVERS 

Pritchard-.^ndrews  Co.,  Ottawa. 
ESCUTCHEON   PINS 

I'ai-menler  .V    Bulk.ch    Co.,    Gananoque,    Ont 
EXHAUST  HEADS  AND  HOODS 
Can.    Blower  &  Forge  Co..   Kitchener,   Ont 
Canadian    Fairbanks-Morse   Co.,    .Montreal. 
Sheldons,    Ltd.,    Gait,    Ont. 
EXHAUSTERS 
Can.   Blower  &   Forge  Co.,   Kitchener,   Ont 
H,    W.    Petrie,    Toronto. 
Sheldons,    Ltd.,    Gait,    Ont. 
Sturtevant  Co.,   B.    F.,   Gait,   Ont 

FANS 

Baird   Machine  Co.,   Bridgeport,  Conn. 

Can,    Blower  &   Forge    Co.,    Kitchener,    Ont 

R.    E.    T.    Pringle,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Ont 

Sheldons,    Ltd.,    Gait    Ont. 

The  .Smart -Turner  Machine  Co.,  Hamilton. 
FAUCETS 

Puro    Sanitary    Dk'g.    Fountain    Co.,    HaydenTille, 
Mass. 
FENCE,    IRON   AND   FACTORY 

Canada    Wire  &   Iron   Goods  Co.,   Hamilton,    0»t. 
FERRO-TUNGSTEN 

\'an.idium-Alloys    Steel    Co.,    Pittsburgh,    Pa. 
FILES 

.\ikenhead  Hardware  Co.,    Toronto,   Ont 

.\tkins   &  Co.,    Wm.,    Sheffield,    Bug. 

Can.    B,    K.    Morton   Co..    Toronto,    Ont. 

Delta   File  Works,   Philadelphia.  Pa. 

Mai  "hall    &    Co.,    Geo.    A..    Toronto.    Ont 

Nicholson  File  Co,,  Port  Hope,   Ont. 

Osbom    (Canada),   Ltd..    Sam'l.    .Montreal.    Que. 

Port   Hope   FU*   Mfg.    Co.,    Port   Hope,    Ont. 

Standard   Machv.  &  Supplies.   Ltd.,  Montreal,  Que. 
FILING  MACHINES 

Noble    &    Westbrook   Mifg.    Co.,    Hartford,    Conn, 
FILTERS.  OIL 

Rmv^tr   &    Cn. ,    Inc.,    S.    P.,    Toronto,    Ont 
FILTERS.   WATER 

W.    B.    Scaife    &    Sons,    Pittsburgh,    Pa. 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  0  I  A  N    M  A  C  H  I  N  K  R  Y 


I  can  give  you  immediate  shipment 

of  the  Drills  you've  Scrapped  because  of  Broken  Tangs 

/""^IVE  me  three  minutes  for  every  drill  now  useless 
on  your  scrap  heap  because  of  a  broken  tang  and  I'll 
deliver  you  a  drill  ready  for  action — with  a  tang  twenty-five 
to  sixty  per  cent  stronger  than  before.  There's  no  trick 
about  it —  you  can  do  the  same  thing,  when  you  get  your 

PERFECT 

DOUBLE  <^    T  A  N  G 

SOCKET 

Three  minutes,  two  hands  and  a 
grinding  wlieel  puts  a  new  tang 
just  below  the  old  and  broken 
one,  and  then  a  Perfect  Double 
Tang  Socket  completes  the  job 

The  Cleveland  <^ Twist  Drill  Co 

CLEVELAND 


NEW  YORK 


CHICAGO 


If   any   advertisement   interests   you,   tear  it   out   now   and   place    with     letters  to  be  answered. 


158 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


FIK£    ESCAPES 

Canada   Wire   Sc   Iron   Gooda   Co..  Hamilton,  OnU 
FIRE    EXTINGUISHERS 

Strong,    Kennard   &    Nutt    Co..    Cleveland.    Ohio. 
FIRST  AID  CABINETS 

Strong,   Kennard  &  Nutt   Co.,   CleTeland.    Ohio. 
FISH   PIRATES 

Can.   Steel  Foundries,   Ltd..   Montreal.  Que. 
FIXTURES 

Monarch   Braas   Mfg.   Co.,  Toronto.  Out 
FLEXIBLE    SHAFTS 
R.    E.    T.    Pringle.    Ltd..   Toronlo,    Out. 
Stow    Mfg.    Co.,    Binghamton.    N.Y. 
FLEXIBLE    SHAFT    COILING    MACHINERY 

Sleeper  &  Hartley,    Inc.,   Worcester,   Mass. 
FLINT   SHOT 

U.S.   8Uic»  Co..   Ctiicago,    111. 
FORGES,    HAND,    PORTABLE 
Aikenhead    Hardware    Co..    Toronto.    Out. 
Can.    Blower   &    Forge   Co.,    Kitchener,    Canada. 
Sheldons,    Ltd..    Gait,    Ont. 
FOKOINGS,    DROP,    AUTOMOBILE 
AND   LOCOMOTIVE 
Bliss,  E.    W.,   Co.,  Brooltlyn,  N.Y. 
Can.    BUlires   <St    Spencer.   Ltd..    Welland,    Ont 
Cumming   &    Son,   J.    W..    New   Glasgow,    Canada. 
Dom.    Forge   &   Stpg.    t'o..    Walkemlle.    Out. 
Steel    Co.    of    Canada.    Ltd..    Hamilton,    Ont. 
Whitman    &    Barnes   Mfg.  Co..  St.    Catharines,  Onl. 
J.   H.    Williams  *   Co..    Brooklyn.    N.Y. 
FORGING     HAMMERS.    BELT-DRIVEN 
Blis«,   E.   W..   Co..    Brooklyn,   K.Y. 
J.    H.    Williams   &  Co..    Brooklyn.   N.T. 
FORGING    HAMMERS,    STE.4M    OR    AIR 

Erie  Foundry  Co.,    Erie,   Pa. 
FORGING    JIACHINERY 
John   Bertram  &  aons   Co..    Dundas. 
Bliss.   E.   W..  Co..   Brooklyn,   N.S". 
Brown,    Boggs    Co.,    i^itd.,    Hamilton,    Canada. 
Erie   Foundry    Co.,    Brie,    Pa. 
Garlock- Walker    .Machinery    Co..    Toronto.    Ont. 
National    Machinery   Co..   Tiffin.    Ohio. 
Petrie  of  Montreal.  Ltd..  H.    W..  Montreal.  Que. 
H.    W.    I'etrie.  Toronlo. 
FUEL  OIL  SYSTEMS 

Gilbert  &    Barker   Mfg.   Co.    Springfleld.   Mass. 
FRICTION    LEATHERS 

Graton    i    Knight    Mfg.    Co..    Montreal. 
FURNACES.   ANNEALING.  ETC. 
BeUeyue    Industrial    Furnace   Co.,   Detroit.    Mich. 
Can.    Hoskins,    Ltd.,    Walkeryille.    Ont 
Gilbert    &   Barker   Mfg.    Co..    Springfield,    Mass. 
Mechanical    Engineering   Co.,   Montreal. 
Rockwell   Co..    W.    S..    New    York,    N.Y. 
Tate-Jones  &   Co.,   Leetadale,   Pa.  . 
Whiting   Foundry   Equipment    Co..    Harvey,    111. 
FURNACES.   BLAST 

Toronto    Iron    Works.    Ltd.,   Toronto. 
FURNACES,    BRASS,   MALLEABLE 

Whiting    Foundry    Equipment  Co.,    Harvey,    111. 
FURNACES.    HEAT    TREATING 
HARDENING   AND   TEMPERING 
Bellevtie    Industrial    Fimiace    Co..   Detroit,    Mich. 
Can.    Hoskins,    LM..    Walkerville.    Ont 
Gilbert   &    Barker   Mfg.    Co.,    Springfield,   Mass. 
Tate-Jones  &   Co..   Leetsdale.   Pa. 
FURNACES,   FORGING 
Can.    Hoskins,    Ltd..    Walkerville.    Ont. 
Gilbert    *    Barker   Mfg.    Co..    Springfield.    Mass. 
FURNACES    FOR    BAKING,    BLUING, 
DRYING,    ENAMELING,   JAPANNING 
AND  LACQUERING 
Can.    Hoskins,    Ltd..    Walkerville,    Ont 
Oven    Equipment  &    Mfg.    Co.,    New   Haven.    Conn. 
FUSE   BOXES,  STEEL 

Tom.    Forge    &    Stpg.    Co..    Walkerville.    Ont 
FUSE  CAP   MACHINERY 
Noble   &   Westbrook    Mfg.    Co..    Hartford,    Conn. 
II.    E.   T.    Pringle.   Ltd..   Toronto. 
GALVANIZING   MACHINERY 

Erie    Foondrv   Co.,    Erie.    Pa. 
GANG   PLANER   TOOLS 

Armstrong    Bros.    Tool    Co..    Chicago. 
GASKETS,   LEATHER,   ETC. 

Graton    &    Knicht    Mfg    Co..    Montreal 
GAS    BLOWERS    AND    EXHAUSTERS 
Can.    Blower    ,it    Force    Co..    Kitchener.    Ont 
SheHoos.    Limitpl,    Gait.    Ont. 
GAUGES.    MERCURY    COLUMN.    DRAFT 
Charles    F     Elmps    Enc     Works,    Chicago. 

GAUGES.  HYDRAULIC 

Taylor    Instrument    Co.    Rochester.    N.Y. 
GAUGES,  STANDARD 

Can.    Fairbanks-Morse   Co.,  Montreal. 

Cleveland    Twist    Drill    Co.,    Cleveland. 

Garvin    Machine    Co..    New   York. 

Illinois   Tool    Works,    Chicago,    111. 

Morse    Twist  Drill  &  Mch.    Co.,  N'«v  Bedford.  Mass. 

Osbom    (Canada).    Ltd..    Sam'l.    Montreal.    Que. 

Pratt    &    Whitney    Co..    Hartford.    Conn. 

Toronto   Tool    Works.    Toronto.    Ont. 

Wells    Brothers   Co,    of   Canada.    Gait.    Ont 

Worth    Engineering    Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 
GEAR   BLANKS 

Can.    Steel    Foundries,    Ltd.,    Montreal,    Que. 
GEAR-CltTTING    MACHINERY 

Bilton    .Vlach.    Tool    Co..    Bridgeport.    Conn. 

Dominion    .Machinery   Co..    Toronto. 

Garlo<-k-Walker    Machinery    Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 

Hamilton    Gear   &    Machine    Co.,    Toronto. 

Himoll  Mach.  Co.,   Inc..  Astoria.  L.I..  New  York. 

H.    W.    Petrie.    Ltd..    Montreal. 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto. 

•Rie    Smart-Turner    Machine    Co.,    Hamilton. 

D.   E.    Whlton    Machine   Co.,    New   London,    Conn. 

▲.    R.    WllHama   Machy.    Co..    Toronto. 


GEAR   BOBBING  MACHINES 

Himofl   Mach.  Co.,   Inc.,  Astoria.  L.I.,  New  York. 
GEAR   TURNING   MACHINES,    BEND 

Bndgeford   Mach.    Tool   Works,    Rochester,    N.Y. 
GEARS.   CUT,    MORTISE,   ANGLE,   WORM 
Baiter   Co..   Ltd.,   J.    R..    Montreal.   Que. 
Gardner,    Bobt,    &    Son,    Montreal. 
Grant   Gear   Works,    Boston,    ilass. 
Hamilton    Gear   &    Machine   Co..    Toronto. 
Hull    Iron   &    Steel   Foundries,    Ltd.,    Hull.   Que. 
The  Jenckcs    Mach.    Co.,   Ltd.,   Sheiljrooke,   Que. 
Wm.    Kennedy  &  Sons.   Ltd..  Owen  Sound.   Out 
Philadelphia    Gear    Works.    Philadelphia.    Pa. 
The    Smart-Turner    Machine    Co..    Hamilton. 
Winnipeg  Gear   &    Engr.   Co..    Winnipeg,   Man. 
GEARS.    RAWHIDE 
Hamilton   Gear  Sc  Machine  Co.,   Toronto. 
Gardner,    Robt,   &   Son,   Montreal. 
Grant    Gear   Works.    Boston,    Mass. 
Philadelphia    Gear    Works.    Philadelphia.    Pa. 
A.    R.    Williams   Machy.    Co.,   Toronto. 
Winnipeg   Gear   &    Engr.    Co.,    Winnipeg,   Man. 
GENERATORS,   ELECTRIC 
Can.    Fairbanks--Morse   Co.,    Montreal. 
Dominion   Machinery    Co..    Toronto.    Ont 
Lanca-qhire   Dynamo  &    Motor   Co..  Toronto. 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
H.    W.    Petrie.  Toronto. 
Sturtevant    Co..    B.    F..    Gait.    Ont 
A.    R.    Williams   Machy.    Co..   Toronto. 
GLASSES.   SAFETY 
Strong,    Kennard    &   Nutt   Co.,    Cleveland,    Ohio. 
Willson    &    Co..    Inc..    T.    A..    Reading.    Pa. 
GRAIN  FOR  POLISHING 

Norton    Co..    Worcester.    Maas. 
GRAPHITE 
Aikenhead    Hardware   Co..    Toronto.    Ont 
Standard  Mscbv.   &  Supplie"    Ltd,   .Montreal,  Que. 
GLOVES.    LEATHER    AND    RUBBER 

Hickory    Steel-Grip    Glove   Co.,    Chicago.    HI. 
GLOVES,    STEEL   GRIP,    SAND    BLAST 
Hickory   Steel   Grip  Glove   Co..   Chicago.    HI. 
GRAVITY    CARRIERS 

Can     Mattbewj  Gravity  Carrier  Co.,  Toronto,  Ont 
GREASES    (SEE    LUBRICANTS) 
GRINDER    ATTACHMENTS 
Rivett    Lathe    &    Grinder    Co.,    Boaton.    Mass. 
Wilmarth    A    Morman.    Grand    Rapids.    Mich. 
GRINDERS,   AUTOMATIC  KNIFE 
W.    H.    BanHeld    *    Son.    Toronto. 
Canada    Machinery   Corp.,    Gait,    Ont 
Ffvss   *    Tlill    Machy.    Co..    Montreal. 
Gariock-Welker    Machinery    Co..    Toronto.    Ont 
GRINDERS.  CENTRE  COLUMN,  PEDESTAL 
AND   BENCH 

Blake    *    Johnson    Co..    Waterhury,    Conn. 
Can.    Bond   Hanger   &   Cplg.    Co..  Alexandria,  Ont 
Canada    Machinery    Corp.,    Gait,    Ont 
Cleveland   Pneumatic  Tool  Co   of  Canada.  Toronto. 
Dominion    MaOiv.    Co..    Toronto.    Ont. 
FordSmith    iMacb.    Co.,    Hamilton.    Ont 
Frvss   *    Hill    Macbv.    Co.,    Montreal. 
Garlock-Walker    Machinery    Co.    Toronto.    Ont 
Niles-BementPond    Co..    New    York. 
Modem    Tool    Co..    Erie,    Pa- 
Morse   Twlat    Drill    *   Machine   Co.,   New   Bedford. 
New    Britain    Machine    Co.,    New   Britain,    Conn. 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Ltd..    Montreal. 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Toronto. 
R     E.    T.    Pringle.    Ltd..    Toronto.    Ont. 
Stow    Mfg.    Co..    Binghamton.    N.Y. 
United    States    Electrical   Tool   Co..    Cincinnati,    O, 
GRINDERS,   rilTTER 
Brown    &    Shair*    Mfg.    Co..    Providence.   B.I. 
Fo«s   *    Hill    Machv.    Co..    Montreal. 
Greenfield    Machine  Co..    Greenfield.    Mass. 
I/eBlond   Mach.  Tool  Co.,   R.    K.,  Cincinnati,   O. 
Norton    Grinding   Co.,    Worcester,    Maas. 
Pratt  &   Whitney  Co..    Dundaa.   Ont 
Wilmarth  &   Morman,   Grand  Rapids,   Mich. 
GRINDERS.   DIE   AND  CHASER 
Ijindis    .Machine   Co.,    Waynesboro.    Pa. 
Modem  Tool  Co..  Erie,  Pa. 
National-Acme   Co.,    Cleveland,    Ohio. 
GRINDERS,    DISK 
Armstrong  Bros.   Tool  Co..  Chicago.   111. 
Ford-Smith   Mach.    Co.,    Hamilton.    Ont. 
Gardner  Machine  Co.,  Beloit.  Wis. 
GRINDERS.    DRILL 
Aikenhead   Hardware  Co.,   Toronto,    Ont 
Foss  &  Hill  Machy.  Co.,  Montreal. 
tiarviu   .Machine  Co.,  New  York. 
Uniteil    States   Electrical   Tool   <'o-.   Cincinnati.    O. 
Wilmarth   i    Morman,   Grand   Rapids.   Mich. 
GRINDERS.    CYLINDER.    INTERNAL 
Brown  &  Sharpe   Mfg.   Co.,   Providence,   R.I. 
Fitehburg  Grinding  Mach.   Co..   Fitchbuig.  Maas. 
Foss   i   Hill    Machy.    Co.,   Montreal 
Greentleld    Machme  Co.,    Greenfield.   Mass. 
.\lodei-n    Toul    Co.,    Erie,    Pa- 
Norton  Grinding  Co..   Worcester.   Maas. 
K.    E.    T.    I'lmgle,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Dnt. 
Rivett   Lathe  &  Grinder  Co.,   Brighton.  Mass. 
GRINDERS,   NAIL  DIE 
GRINDERS,    PNEUMATIC 
Can.    Ingei-BoU-Rand   Co.,   Sherbrooke,    Que. 
Cleveland   Pneumatic  Tool  t.'o.  of  Canada,  Toronto. 
Garlock- Walker  Machinery  Co..  Toronto,  Ont 
Independent  l*neumatic  Tool  Co..  Chicago,  IlL 
GRINDERS,    PORTABLE,    ELECTRIC, 
HAND,    TOOL    POST,    FLOOR    AND    BENCH 
Baird    .Machine  Co.,    Bridgeport.   Conn. 
Brown  &  Sharpe  Mfg.  Co.,   Providence,  B.I. 
Can.   Bond  Hanger  &  Cplg.  Co..  Alexandria,  Ont 
Cmcinnati    Electrical    Tool    Co..    Cincinnati,    Ohio. 
Dominion  Machy.   Co.,  Toronto,  Ont 
Ford-Smith    Mach.    Co.,    Hamilton.    Ont 
Foss  &  Hill  Machy.  Co.,  Montreal 
Grant   Mfg.    &  Machine  Co,.   Brid»eport,   Com. 


Garlock- Walker    Machinery   Co..    Toronto.    Ont. 
Greenfield  Machine  Co..   Greenfield,    M«a«. 
Independent    Pneumatic    Tool    Co..    Chicago. 
Norton  Co.,   Woroeater,    Mass. 

Petrie   of   Montreal,    Ltd..   H.    W..   Montreal.  Qoa. 
H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto. 
R.    E.    T.    Pringle,    Ltd.,   Toronto,    Ont 
United   States   Electrical   Tool  Co.,   Ciuoinnati.   O. 
A.    R.    Williams    Machy.    Co.,   Toronto. 
GRINDERS.    RADIAL 

Rivett   Lathe   &   Grinder  Co..    Brighton.   SiaM. 
GRINDERS.  TOOL  AND  HOLDER 
Armstrong   Bros.   Tool  Co..  Chicago. 
W.    F.   &   John   Barnes  Co..    Rockford.   111. 
Blake   &   Johnaon    Co.,    WateAury,    Conn. 
Blount,   J.    G.,    &   Co.,    Everett,   Maas. 
Brown   &   Sharpe   Mfg.    Co..    Providence,   R.I. 
Ford-Smith    Machine    Co..    Hamilton.    Out 
Greenfield    Machine   Co..    Greenfield,   Mass. 
National-Acme   Co.,    Cleveland,   Ohio. 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Ltd..    Montreal. 
Tabor    Mfg.    Co,    PhiladeOphia,    Pa. 
Wing   4   Son.   J,   E.,'  Hamilton,    Ont 
GRINDERS.   UNIVERSAL,   PLAIN 
Fitehburg  Grinding  Machine  Co.,  Fitchburf,  Man. 
Modem  Tool  Co.,    Brie,   Pa. 
Wilmarth   &   Morman,   Grand   Rapids,  Mich. 
GRINDERS.   VERTICAL   SURFACE 
Brown   &    Sharpe    Mfg.    Co.,    Providence,   R.I. 
Can.   Fairbanka^Morse  Co.,  Montreal. 
Pratt   *   Whitney  Co.,    Dundaa.    Ont 
H.  B.  Slreeter.  KS  New     Birk.s  BMg..  Montreal.  Que. 
Wilmarth    A    Morman,    Grand    Rapids.    Mi<^ 
Wing  i   Son,  J.    E..   Hamilton,   Ont 
GRINDING    AND    POLISHING 
MACHINES.    PORTABLE.     PNEUMATIC 
AND   SPRING   FRAME 
Can.    Fairbanka-Morae   Co..    Montreal. 
Cincinnati    Electrical    Tool    Co  .    Cinrinnati,    Ohio. 
Ford-Smith  Mach.   Co..  Hamilton.  Ont 
Gardner.    Robt.,    A   Son.    Montreal. 
Garvin    Machine   Co.    New   York. 
Garlock- Walker   Machinery   Co..   Toronto,   Onrt. 
Greenfield    Machine   Co.,   Greenfield,    Maaa. 
Hall   4   Sons.   John   H..  Brantford. 
LeRlond    Mach.   Tool   Co..    R.    K.,   Cincinnati. 
Nile«-Bement-Pond  Co..   New   York. 
Petrie   of   Montreal.    Ltd.,   H.    W..    Montreal,   Qn». 
H.    W.    Petrie,   Toronto. 

Wilmarth    A    Morman.    Grand    Raoids,    Mich. 
Stow  Mfg.   Co..  Binghampton,  N.T. 
GRINDING  WHEELS 
Aikenhead   Hardware   Co,   Toronto.    Ont 
Baiter   Co.    Ltd.,    J.    R..    Momtreal.    Que. 
Can.    Filrhanka-Morse    Co.,    Montreal. 
Can.    B     K.    Morton.   Toronto.    Montreal. 
Carbonindum  Co..   Niagara  Falls. 
Ford-Smith   Mach  Co..   Hamilton.   Ont. 
Foaa  A  Hill   Machy.   Co..    Montreal. 
Francis   A    Co,    Hartford,   Conn. 
Norton  Co,,   Wnrceoter,    Maas. 
H.   W.   Petrie.   Toronto. 
GUARDS,   WINDOW    AND   MACHINE 
Canada  Wire  A  Iron  Goods  Co.,  Hamilton,  On*. 
Ford-Smith    Machine    Co.,    Hatr-ilton.    Ont 
New  Britain   Mach,  Co..  New  Britain,  Gonn. 
Stow    Mfg,    Co.    Binghampton.    N.Y. 
HACK   SAW   BLADES 
Aikenhead  Hardware  Co..  Toronto.  Ont 
Baiter  Co..  Ltd..  J.  R.,  "Montreal,  Que. 
Diamond  Saw  A   Stamping  Works,    Buffalo,  N.T. 
Ford-Smith    Machine    Co.,    Hamiltnn.    Ont 
Pom  a  Hill  Machy.  Co.,  Montreal. 
Millers   Falls  Co.,    Millers   Falls.    Mass. 
Oabom   (Canada.  Ltd..  Sam'l,  Montreal.  Que. 
H.   W.   Petrie.  Ltd..  Montreal. 
Racine  Tool   A   Machine  Co..   Racine.   Wis. 
L.    S.    Starrett  Co..    Athol,    Mass. 
Standard   Machv.   A  Supplies.   Lt-I  .   Montreal,  Que. 
Victor   Saw    Works,   l>td,,    Hamilton.    Canada. 
Zenith   Coal   A    Steel   Products,   Montreal,   Que. 
HACK  SAW  FRAMES 
Aikenhead   Hardware   Co,,   Toronto.   Ont 
Garvin    Machine    Co..    New   York    City. 
Millers  Falls  Co.   Millers  Falls,    Mass, 
HAMMERS.    AIR 

Erie  Foundry  Co.,  Erie.  Pa. 
HAMMERS,    DROP    AND    BELT. DRIVEN 
Beaudry  A  Co..  Boston,  Mass. 
Bliss.   E.   W..   Co..   Brooklyn.  N.Y. 
Brown,   Boggs  Co..  Ltd..  Hamilton.  Canada. 
Canadian  Billings  A  Spencer,   Ltd.,   Welland. 
Canada   .Machinery  Corp..   Gait,   Ont 
Erie   Foundry  Co.,    Brie,  Pa. 
High  Speed  Hammer  Co.,  Rochester.  N.Y. 
A.    B.    Jardine  &   Co..   Hespeler.   Ont 
Niles-Bement-l'ond   Co.,    New    York. 
Plessisville    FoundiT    Co..    Plfs.sisville,    Que. 
Toledo  Machine  A  Tool  Co.,  Toledo.         • 
United    Hammer   Co..    Boston.   Mass. 
HAMMERS,    HELVE    POWER 
Canada  Machinery  Corp.,  Gait,  Ont 
West  Tire  Setter  Co.,   Rochester.   N.Y. 
HAMMERS,    POWER 
Beaudry  A   Co..   Boston,   Mass. 
Erie   Foundry  Co..   Brie.  Pa. 
United    Hammer   Co.,   Boston,   Mass. 
HAMMERS.    CHIPPING,    CAULKING, 
PNEUMATIC 
Can.     Inger^oll-Band   Co.,    Sherbrooke.    Que. 
Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.  of  Canada.  Toronla 
Gariock-Walker  Machinery  Co..  Toronto,  Ont 
Independent  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.,  Chicago,  IlL 
R.    E.    T.    Pringle.  Ltd.,    Toronto,   Ont 
HAMMERS,   MARKING 
Matthews,  Jas,  H.  A  Co.,  Pittsburgh,  Pa. 


September  6,  IDll 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  N    M  A  C  H  I  N  E  R  Y 


iji.iniiiii.i 


lililllil<lii:illilil:lllillll|{|ill|i|i|i|illlilllil<|: 


Do  You  Know  It? 

The  good  qualities  that  are  inherent  in  the 
Rockford  Drills  are  found  in  the  construc- 
tion of  this  Heavy  Duty  Box  Column  Drill- 
ing Machine.  This  machine  will  maintain 
high-speed  maximum  efficiency  in  solid  steel 
up  to  2%"  dia.  It  is  by  far  the  greatest  in 
its  field  of  usefulness.  Capacity  for  boring 
up  to  6"  in  steel  or  cast  iron. 

Phosphor  bronze  bushings;  automatic  trip; 
three  simple  combination  drives;  high  car- 
bon forged  steel  spindle,  nose  is  bored  for 
No.  5  Morse  taper,  slotted  across  end  for 
driving  heavy  boring  and  facing  heads. 

Your  inquiry  will  be  quickly  and  intelli- 
gently answered. 

Rockford  Drilling  Machine  Co. 

Rockford,  111.,  U.S.A. 

yVrite  for  our  Catalogue 


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From  the 

SMALLEST 

to  the 

LARGEST 

in  Ball  Bearing 

Sensitive  Drilling 

Machines 


WHATEVER  YOUR  REQUIREMENTS 

as  to  size,  if  you  want  to  get  the  machine  most 
suitable  to  your  work,  get  the 


(Zve^ 


The  widft^t  hue  in  sizes, — the  greatest  variety  in 
styles: — higher  speeds,  together  with  extreme 
simplicity  and  convenience,  enable  you  to 
specialize  to  he.st  advantage. 


GOOD  DELIVERIES 


WRITE  US  AT  ONCE 


THE  CINCINNATI  PULLEY  MACHINERY  CO. 

CINCINNATI,  OHIO,  U.S.A. 


If   any   advertisement   interests  you,   tear  it   out   now    and   place   with  ktlcis  to  be  answered. 


160 


HAMMERS,    MOTOR-DRIVEN 

Beaudry  &  Co.,    Boston.   Mass.         „    ^     . 
Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfe.  Co..  St.   Cathannes,  Onl. 
HAMMERS,    NAIL    MACHINE 

United    Hammer    Co.,    Boston,    Mass. 
HAMMERS.    STEAM 
John   Bertram  *  Sons  Co..  Dundas. 
Canada    Machinery   Corp.,    Gait,    Ont. 
Erie   Foundry  Co..    Erie.    Pa. 
Niles-Eement-Pond    Co.,    New   York. 
HAND    LEATHERS    OR    PADS 
Oraton   &   Knight  Mfe-   Co..    Jlontreal. 
Hicliory    Steel-Grip   Glote    Co.,   Chicago.    lU. 
HANGERS,    SHAFT 
Baird    Machine   Co..    Bridgeport,   Conn. 
Can.    Bond  Hanger  &  Cplg.   Co.,   Alexandria,   Ont. 
Can.    S  K  F   Co.,   Toronto,  Ont 
Gardner,  Robt..  &  Son,  Montreal. 
Petrie   of  Montreal,    Ltd..  H.   W.,   Montreal,   Que. 

H.    W.    Petrie,  Toronto,  ^  ,  ^.       „ 

Standard   Pressed  Steel  C^..   Philadelphia,   Pa. 
HARDENING   AND    TEMPERING 
Holz.    Herman  A..    1   -Madison   Ave..   New  York, 
Osbom    (Canada).    Ltd..    Sam'l,    Montreal,    Que. 
HARDNESS    TESTING    INSTRUMENTS 
Shore    Instrument    &    Mfe.    Co.,    New    York. 
HEATERS 
Scaife   &    Sons   Co.,    Wm,    B.,    Pittsburgh.    Pa. 
Sturtevant  Co.,   B.    P..   Gait.    Ont. 
HEATING   AND  VENTILATING 
ENGINEERS 
Can.    Blower   &    Forge   Co..    Kitchener,    Ont. 
Sheldons.    Ltd.,    Gait,    Ont. 
HEAT   GAUGES,    HARDENING 
AND   ANNEALING 
Holz.    Herman   A.,    1   Madison   Ave..    New   York. 
Shore    Instrument   &   Mfg.    Co.,    New    York. 
HIGH   SPEED   TOOL  METAL 

Deloro    Smelting   &    Refining   Co.,    Toronto,    Ont. 
BINGE   MACHINERY 

Baird    Machine   Co.,    Bridgeport,    Conn. 
HINGES 

London   Bolt  &  Hinge   Works,   London,  Ont. 
HOBS 

Illinois    Tool    Works.    Chicago,    111. 
Osbom-  (Canada),    LUl..    Sam'l,    Montreal,    Que. 
HOISTING    AND    CONVEYING 
MACHINERY 
Can.    .Matthews   Gravity  Carrier  Co.,  Toronto.  Ont. 
Jenckes   Mach.    Co.,    vSherbrooke,    Que. 
Marsh    &    Henthom,    Belleville.    Ont. 
Northern    Crane    Works.    Walkerrille.    Ont. 
Petrie   of   Montreal.    Ltd.,    H.    W.,   Montreal,   Que. 
Whiting   Foundry   Equipment  Co.,   Harvey,    111. 
HOISTS,   CHAIN    AND    PNEUMATIC 
Can.     Ingersoll-Rand    Co.,    Sherbrooke,    Que. 
Garlock-Walker    Machinery   Co..    Toronto,    Ont 
Ford   Chain    Block    &    Mfg.,    Philadelphia,    Pa. 
Independent   Pneumatic  Tool  iCo..    Chicago,    111. 
Jenckes  ^lach.    Co..    Sherbrooke.    Que. 
Marsh    &    Henthom.    Belleville.    Ont. 
Northern    Crane    Works.    Walkerville.    Ont. 
Whiting   Foundry   Equipment   Co..   Harvey.   III. 
Wright    Mfg.    Co..    Lisbon,    Ohio. 
HOISTS.    ELECTRIC 
The  Jenckes  ilach.    Co.,    Ltd.,  Sherbrooke,   Que, 
Kennedy   &   Sons.    Owen   Sound.    Ont 
Northem    Crane    Works.    Walkerville,    Ont. 
Winnipeg   Gear  &    Engrag  Co.,    Winnipeg,   Man. 
HOLDERS.    STEEL    DIE    FOR    MARKING 

Matthews.    Jas.    H..    &   Co..    Pittsburgh.    Pa. 
HOPPERS 
Jenckes   Mach.    Co..  Ltd.,    Sherbrooke.   Que. 
Toronto  Iron  Works.  Ltd..  Toronto.  Ont 
HOSE.   PNEUMATIC 
Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.  of  Canada.  Toronto. 
Garlock-Walker    Machinery   Co..    ToionUi.    Ont 
Goodyear  Tire  &  Rubber  Co..  Toronto.   Ont. 
Independent   Pneumatic   Tool  Co.,    Chicago.    111. 
Wells    Bros.    Co.    of   Canada.    Gait.    Ont 
HOLDERS  FOR  DIES  AND  DRILLS, 
HYDRAULIC   MACHINERY 
Dominion   Machinery  Co.,   Toronto. 
Charles   P.    Elmes  Eng.    Works.    Chicago. 
Garlock-Walker    Machinery   Co..    Toronto,    Ont 
Metalwood    Mfg.    Co..    Detroit,    Mich. 
Niles-Bement-Pond    Co.,    New   York. 
William  R.   Perrin.  Ltd.,  Toronto. 
H.    W.    Petrie.   Toronto. 
West  Tire  Setter  Co..    Rochester,   N.Y. 
INDICATORS.   SPEED 
Aikenhead   Hardware   Co.,   Toronto.    Ont 
Brown    &    Sharpe    .Mfg.    Co.,    Providence,    R.I. 
L.   S.  Starrett  Co.,  Athol,   Mass. 
INDEX  CENTRES 
Fred   C.    Diclsow,   Chicago.   111. 
Garvin    Machine   Co..    Now   York. 
INDICATING  INSTRUMENTS 

Taylor   Instrument    Co..    Rochester.   N.Y. 
IRON   ORE 

Hanna    &    Co..    M.    A..    Cleveland.    O. 
JACKS 
Aikenhead    Hardware   Co..    Toronto.    Ont 
Can.    Pairtianks-Morse  Co..    Montreal. 
Northern  Crane  Works,   Walkerville, 
Norton,   A.    O.,   Coaticook.   Que. 


Petr 


H.    W..    Toronto. 


JACKS.    HYDRAULIC 

Charles   F.    Elmes   Eng.    Works.    Chicago. 
JACKS.    PNEUMATIC 

Northen  Crane  Works.    Walkerville. 
JACKS.    PIT   AND    TRACK 

Can.    Fairbanks-Morse    Co..    Montreal. 

Northem   Crane    Works,    Walkerville. 
JAWS.   FACE    PLATE 

Cushman  Chuck  Co..   Hartford.   Conn. 
Skinner  Chuck  Co..  New  Britain,  Codb, 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


JIGS.   TOOLS,  ETC. 

Homer   &   Wilson.    Hamilton.   Ont. 

Osbom   (Canada).   Ltd..    Sam  I,  -Montreal.    Que. 

Toronto  Tool  Co.,  Toronto,   Ont. 

KEY  SEATERS  „        „        .      ^  , 

GarlockAValker   Machinery   Co..    Toronto.   Ont. 
Garvin  Machine  Co..  New  York. 
Morton    .Mfg.    Co.,    Muskegon    Heights,    Mich, 
i    R.   Williams  Machy.  Co..  Torgnlo, 


LABELS   AND  TAGS 

.Matthews.   Jas.    H.   &  Co..   Pittsburgh,  Pa. 
LABORATORIES.  INSPECTION 
AND    TESTING    (SEE    CHEMISTS) 
LADLES.    FOUNDRY 

Northem    Crane    Works.    Walkerville. 

Whiting    Foundry    Equipment    Co..    Harvey.    HI. 
LAG    SCREW    GIMLET    POINTERS 

National   .Machy.    Co..   Tilfin.  Ohio. 
LAMPS.    INCANDESCENT   AND    NITROGEN 

Can.    Liirn-lMiilips    Co..    Toronto.    Dnt. 
LAMPS.  TUNGSTEN    (Vacuum  and  Gas  Filled) 

Can.    Laof.-l'liilips   Co..    Toronto.    Ont 
LATHES.    BENCH  ,    „ 

H.   E.   Streeter.  New  Birks  Bldg..    Montreal,  Que. 
LATHES.  CHUCKNG 

Acme  .Machine  Tool  Co..  Cincinnati.   Ohio. 
LATHE  CHUCKS    (SEE  CHUCKS) 
LATHE    DOGS   AND   ATTACHMENTS 

Armstrong   Bros.    Tool  Co..   Chicago. 

Curtis  &   Curtis  Co.,   Bridgeport.   Conn. 

Hendey   Machine  Co..  Torrington.  Conn. 

Rivett   Lathe   &   Grinder   Co.,   Boston.   Mass. 

J.   H.   Williams  &  Co.,   Brooklyn,   N.Y. 

Winnipeg  Gear  &  Engmg  Co.,   Winnipeg,  Man. 

LATHES.   AXLE 

Bridgefoni    Mach.    Tool    Works.    Rochester.    N.Y. 
LATHES,   PRECISION,   BENCH 

W.    F.   &  John   Barnes  Co.,   Kockford. 
Blount.  J.  G..  4  Co.,  Everett,  Mass. 
Can    Fairbanks-Morse   Co.,   Montreal. 
Fosa  &    Hill  Machy.   Co..  Montreal. 
Garlock-Walker    Machinery  Co..   Toronto.   Ont. 
Hanlinge   Bros..   Chicago.   HI. 
New   Britain   Mach.  Co.,   New  Britain,  Conn. 
Pratt  &   Whitney  Co..  Dundas.   Ont. 
Rivett    Lathe    &    Grinder   Co..    Boston.    Mass. 
Walcott   Lathe    Co..   Jackson,    Mich. 
LATHES.   BAND  TURNING 
The    Jenckes    Mach.    Co..    Ltd..    Sherbrooke.    Que. 
Boelofson    Machine  &   Tool  Co..  Toronto.   Ont 
Warden   King  Co..  Montreal.  Que. 
LATHES.   BRASS 
Acme   Machine  Tool  Co..   Cincinnati.   Ohio. 
Hardinge    Bros..    Inc..    Chicago.    111. 
LATHES,   ENGINE 
Acme  Machine  Tool  Co..  Cincinnati.   Ohio. 
John    Bertram   &   Sons   Co..    Dundaa. 
Bridgeford   .Mach.    Tool   Works.    Rochester.   N.Y. 
Canada   Machinery  Corp..   Gait.   Ont 
Can.    Fairbanks-Moree  Ca.   Montreal. 
Cincinnati   Iron   &  Steel  Co..  Cincinnati.  Ohio. 
Dominion    ^lachinery   Co..    Toronto. 
Foss  &    Hill   .Machy.   Co..   Montreal. 
Oarlock-Walker  Machinery   Co..   Toronto.   Ont. 
Garvin   Machine  Co..   New   York. 
Hamilton   Mach.   Tool  Co..   Hamilton.   Ohio. 
Hill.   Clarke  &   Co..   Chicago.    111. 
Himoff  Mach.   Co..   Inc..   Astoria.  L.I..  New  York. 
McCabe.   J.    J..    New   York.   N.Y. 
R.   -McDougall  Co.,  Gait 
NUesBement-Pond  Co..   New   York. 
H.    W.    Petrie,   Toronto. 

Rivett   Lathe  &   Grinder  Co..   Boston.    Mass. 
Riverside   Machinery   Depot.    Detroit.    Mich. 
Standard   Machy.  &  Supplies.    Ltd..  Montreal.  Que. 
Sebastian  iLathe    Co..    Cincinnati.   Ohio. 
Walcott   Lathe   Co..   Jackson.   Mich. 
Whitcomb-Blaisdell    Mach.    Tool    Co.,    Worcester, 

Mass. 
A.    R.    Williams    Machy.    Co..   Toronto. 
LATHES,   JOURNAL    TRUEING 
Bridgeford  Mach-    Tool    Works.    Rochester.   N.Y. 
MoCabe.   J.   J..    New  York.    N.Y. 
LATHES.    PATTERNMAKERS' 
J.    G.    Blount  Co..    Everett.    Mass. 
Canada   .Machinery  Corp..    Gait.    Ont 
Foss  &  Hill   Machy.   Co..   Montreal. 
Garlock-Walker   .Machy.    Co..    Toronto.    Ont. 
The   Jenckes   Mach.    Co..    Ltd..    Sherbrooke.    Que. 
MoCabe.   J.   J..    New  York,    N.Y. 
H.    W.    Petrie,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
H.    W.    Petrie.   Toronto. 
LATHES,  SINGLE  PURPOSE 
Bertram,  John.   &  Sons  Co.,   Dundas.   Ont. 
Canada    Machinery   Corp..    Gait,    Ont 
Can   Fairbanks-Morse  Co..  Montreal. 
Garlock-Walker   Machy.    Co.,   Toronto,   Ont 
Gray    Mfg.    &    Mach.    Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 
Hepbum.   John   T..    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
Himoff  Macli.   Co..  Inc.,   Astoria.  L.I..  New  York. 
The   Jenckes   Mach.   Co.,    Ltd..    Sherbrooke,    Que. 
McCabe.   J.   J..    New  York.   N.Y. 
Roelofson  Mach.   &  Tool  Co..  Toronto,   Can. 
Walcott  Lathe  Co.,   Jackson.  Mich. 
LATHES,  SCREW  CUTTING 
Bertram,  John.   &   Sons  Co..  Dundas,   Ont 
Canada  Machinery  Corp..   Gait.   Ont 
Dominion    .Machinery    Co..    Toronto. 
Foss   &   HiU   Machy.    Co..    .Montreal. 
Foster  Machine  Co..  Elkhart.   Ind. 
Garlock-Walker   -Machy.    Co..    Toronto,    Ont 
Hardinge    Bros..    Inc..    Chicago.    111. 
Hepburn.   John   T.,    Ltd..   Toronto. 
McCabe.   J.   J..   New  York,   N.Y. 
Niles-Bement-Pond  Co.,  New  York. 


Volume  XVIII. 


H.   W.   Petrie.   Toronto. 

Rivett    Lathe    &    Grinder   Co.,    Boston.    Mass. 
Riverside   Machinery   Depot,    Detroit,    Mich. 
•Whitcomb-Blaisdell    Mach.    Tool    Co..    Worcester, 

iMass. 
A.    R.    Williams    Machy.    Co..  Toronto. 

LATHES,   SPINNING 

Bliss,    E.    W..    Co..    Brooklin.    N.Y. 
Ferracute   Mach.   Co..  Bridgeton.  N.J. 
Mc-Cabe.    J.   J..    New   York,    N.Y. 
LATHES,   TURRET   AND   HAND 
Acme   Machine   Tool    Co..  Cincinnati.    Ohio. 
John    Bertram  &   Sons  Co..    Dundas. 
Blount.   J.    G..    &   Co..    Everett,   Mass. 
Brown   &   Sharpe   Mfg.   Co..    Providence.    B.I. 
Can.    Fairbanks-Morse  Co..   Montreal. 
Canada   Machinery  Corp.,    Gait,    Ont 
Foss   &    Hill  Machy.    Co.,   Montreal. 
Foster  Machine  Co.,  Elkhart,  Ind. 
Gariock-Walker   Machy.   Co.,   Toronto,   Ont. 
Hardinge    Bros.,    Inc..    Chicago,    lU. 
Hepbum.    John   T..    Ltd..    Toronto,    Ont 
Hill,    Clarke   &    Co.,    Chicago.    lU. 
Himoff  .Mach.  Co.,  Inc.,  Astoria,  L.I.,  New  York. 
The  Jenckes  Mach.  Co..  Ltd..  Sherbrooke.  Que. 
R    K    L^Blond  Mach.   Tool  Co..  Cincinnati,  Ohio. 
MoCabe,   J.   J..   New   York,    N.Y. 
Mulliner-Enlimd    Tool    Co.,    SyiaciLSe.    N.Y. 
National-Acme  Co..   Cleveland.   Ohio. 
New   Britain   Machine  Co.,   New   Britain,   Conn. 
Niles-Bement-Pond    Co..    New   York. 
H.   W.   Petrie.  Toronto. 

Rivett    Lathe   &   Grinder   Co.,    Boston,    Mass. 
Riverside    Machinery    Depot,    Detroit.    Mich. 
Standard    Machy.  &  Supplies,  Ltd. .  Montreal,    Que. 
Steinle  Turret   Mach.    Co.,    Madison,    Wis. 
Warner   &   Swasey   Co..    Cleveland,    O. 
A.    R.    Williams  Machy.   Co..   Toronto. 
LEAD   BURNING 

St.    Lawieiice  Welding  Co..  Montreal,  Que. 
LEATHER   STRAPPING 

Graton    &    Knight   Mfg.    Co.,    Worcester,    Mass. 
LIFTS,   PNEUMATIC 

Whiting   Foundry    Equipment   Co..   Harvey,    111. 
LINK    BELTING 
Can.    Fairbanks-Morse  Co..    Montreal. 
Jones    &    Glassco.    Montreal,    Que. 
Morse    Chain    Co..    Ithaca.    N.Y. 
LINOLEUM    MILL   MACHINERY 

Bertrams.    Ltd..    Edinburgh.    Scotland. 
LIQUID  AIR 
Carter   Welding    Co..    Toronto.    Ont 
L'Air   Liquide    Society.    Montreal,   Toronto. 
Prest-O-Lite  Co..    Inc..    Toronto.   Ont 
LOCKERS.    STEEL    WARDROBE 
AND  STEEL  MATERIAL 

Canada  Wire  &  Iron   Goods  Co..   Hamilton.  Ont. 
LUBRICANTS 

Cataract   Refining   &   .Mfg.    Co.,   Toronto. 
LUBRICATORS 
Roper.    C.    F..    &    Co..    Hopedale.    Mass. 
Trahem    Pump   Co..   Rockford.    111. 
MACHINERY    DEALERS 
Baird    Machy.    Co..    W.    J..    Detroit,    Mich. 
Can.    Fairbanks-Morse   Co.,    Montreal. 
Dickow.   Fred  C,  Chicago.   111. 
Dominion  Machy.  Co.,  Toronto,  Ont. 
Garlock-Walker    Machy.    Co..    Toronto,    Ont 
Foss  &   Hill   Machy.    Co..   Montreal. 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Ltd..    .Montreal. 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Toronto. 
R.    E.    T.    Pringle.    Ltd.,   Toronto.    Ont. 
Standard    Machy.  &  Supplies,  Ltd..  Montreal,    Que. 
A.    R.    Williams  Machy.   Co..   Toronto. 
MACHINERY    GUARDS     (SEE    GUARDS) 
MACHINERY   REPAIRS 
Prest-O-Lite   Co.,    Inc..   Toronto,   Ont 
Sumbling    Mach.    Co..    W.    H..   Toronto,    Ont. 
MACHINISTS'   SCALES.   SMALL 
TOOLS  AND  SUPPLIES 
Can.    Fairbanks-.Morse   Co..    Montreal. 
Frank    H.    Scott.    Montreal. 
J.   H.    Williams   &   Co..   Brooklyn.   N.Y. 
MANDRELS 
Can.    Fairbanks-Moree    Co.,   Montreal. 
Cleveland   Twist   Drill   Co.,   Cleveland. 
Hannifin  Mfg.  Co.,  Chicago.  111. 
A.    B.    Jardine  &  Co..   Hespeler.   Ont 
Manufacturers    Equip.    Co.,    Chicago,    111. 
Monarch    Brass    Mfg.    Co..    Toronto.    Ont 
Morse    Twist    DriU    &    Mach.    Co..    New    Bedfori. 

Mass. 
H.   W.    Petrie.   Ltd..  Montreal. 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Toronto. 
Pratt   &    Whitney  Co..   Dundas.    Ont 
Stone  Tool  &   Supply  Co..  J.    R..   Detroit.  Mich. 
MARKING    DEVICES 
Pritchard-Andrews  Co.    of   Canada,    Ottawa,    Ont, 
Matthews,   Jas.    H.,   &   Co..    Pittsburgh,    Pa. 
MARKING   MACHINERY 
Brown     Boggs    Co.,    Hamilton.   Ont 
Foss    &    Hill    Machy.    Co..    .Montreal. 
Martin    Machine   Co..    Greenfield,    ilass. 
Noble   &    Westbrook   -Mfg.    Co..   Hartford.  Conn. 
Perrin.    Wm.    R..    Toronto. 
MEASURING   TAPES    AND   RULES 

James    Chestcrman   &    Co..    Ltd..    Sheffield,    Bng. 
METALLURGISTS  „     .      ,     „ 

Can.    Inspection   &   Testing  Lab..    Montreal.    Que. 
Toronto   Testing    Laboratory.    Ltd.,   Toronto, 

METALS 

Can     B     K.    Morton.   Toronto.  IMontreal. 

Dom.    Iron   &   Wrecking  Co.,   Ltd.,  .Montreal,   Que. 

Stindarf   .Machy.  &  Supplies.    Ltd..  Montreal.  Que. 
METERS.   OIL.   WATER 

Bowser  &    Co..    Inc..    S.    F..   Toronto.    Ont 
MILL   MACHINERY 

Alexander   Fleck.    Ltd..   Ottawa. 
MILLING  MACHINES.   AUTOMATIC 

Bilton  Mach.  Tool  Co..   Bridgeport.  Conn. 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


161 


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the  subject. 

Since  the  first  "twisted"  drill  was  placed 
on  the  market  by  this  company  it  has  been 
fully  proved  on  many  difficult  drilling  jobs 
that  drills  so  made  have  many  advantages. 

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to  the    forging  process  prior  to    twisting. 

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Clark  Equipment  Company 

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CANADIAN     MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


MILLING  ATTACHMENTS 

Becker  Alilling  Machine  Co.,    Boston,  Mass. 

John   Bertram   &   Sons   Co.,    Dundas. 

Brown    &    Sharpe   Wfg.    Co.,    Providence. 

Canada    Machinery    Corp.,    Gait,    Ont. 

Cincinnati   Milling  Machine  Co.,    Cincinnati. 

Cleveland  Milling  Mach.  Co.,  Cleveland,  Ohio. 

Ford-Smith   Mach.    Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont. 

Fox    Machine    Co.,    Jackson,    Mich. 

Hardinge   Bros.,    Inc.,    Chicago,    111. 

Hendey    Mach.    Co.,    Torrington,    Conn. 

Hinckley   Machine   Works,    Hinckley,    Wis. 

Kempsmith    Mfg.    Co.,    Milwaukee.    Wis. 

Kiles-Bement-Pond   Co.,    New    York. 

Pratt   cSi   Whitney   Co.,    Dundas,   Ont. 

Taft-Pierce    Mfg.    Co.,    Woonsocket,    K.I. 
MILLING  MACHINES,  HAND 

Hardinge    Bros.,    Inc.,    Chicago,    IK. 

United  States  Mach.  Tool  Co  ,    Cincinnati,   Ohio. 

Whitney   Mfg.    Co.,    Hartfonl.   Conn. 
MILLING    MACHINES,    HORIZONTAL 
AND   VERTICAL 

Becker   Milling   M.nchme    Co.,    Boston.    Mass. 

Brown    &    Sharpe    -Mfg.    Co.,    Providence. 

John    Bertram   &.   8ons    Co.,    Dundas. 

Cleveland   Milling    Machine    Co.,    Cleveland.    Ohio. 

Canada    .Machinerv    Corp.,     Gait,    Ont. 

Ford-Smith    Mach.    Co.,    Hamilton.    Ont. 

Poss   &  Hill   Machy.    Co.,    Montreal. 

Fox    Machine   Co.,   Jackson,   Mich. 

Garlock-Walker   Machinery   Co.,    Toronto,    OnL 

Gooley   &    Edlund,    Cortland,    N.Y. 

Hardinge   Bros.,   Inc.,   Chicago,   111. 

Hill.    Clarke    &    Co..    Chicago,    111. 

Kempsmith    Mfg.    Co.,    Milwaukee,    Wis. 

R.  K.  LeBlond  Mach.  Tool  Co.,  Cincinnati,  Ohio. 

Niles-Bement-Pond  Co.,    New    York. 

H.    W.    Petrie,   Ltd.,    Montreal. 

H.    W.    Petrie,   Toronto. 

Pratt   &   'n'hilney   Co.,    Dundas.    Ont. 

Riverside  Machinery  Depot,  Detroit,  Mich. 

Stcptoe,   The  John   Co.,    Cincinnati,    Ohio. 

United   States   Mach.    Tool   Co.,    Cincinnati,    Ohio. 

Whitney   .Mfg.    Co...  Hartfoid,   Conn. 

A.    R.    Williams   .Machy.    Co.,    Toronto. 
MILLING  MACHINES.   PLAIN, 
BENCH    AND   UNIVERSAL 

Becker   Milling   Machine   Co..    Boston.    Mass. 

Bilton  Mach.   Tool   Co..    Bridgeport,   Conn. 

Brown    &    Sharpe    Mfg.    Co.,    Providence. 

Canada    Machinery    Coni..    Gait.    ont. 

Cincinnati    Milling   .Machine   Co.,    Cincinnati. 

Ford-Smith   Mach.    Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont. 

Foss   &   Hill   Machy.    Co.,   Montreal. 

Fox    Machine    Co.,    Jackson,    Mich. 

Garlock-Walker   Machinery   Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 

Garvin  Machine  Co.,   New  York. 

Gooley    &    Edlund,    Cortland,    N.Y. 

Hardinge  Bros.,   Inc.,   Chicago.   111. 

Hendey  Machine  Co.,  Torrington. 

Kempsmith    Mfg.    Co.,    Milwaukee,    Wis. 

R.   K.  LeBlond  Mach.  Tool  Co.,  Cincinnati,  Ohio 

Niles-Bement-Pond    Co.,    New    York. 

H.    W.    Petrie,   Toronto. 

Pratt   &   WWlney  Co..    Dundas.    Ont. 

Steptoe,    The  John   Co.,    Cincinnati,    Ohio. 

A.   B.    Williams  Machy.    Co..   Toronto. 
MILLING  MACHINES,  PROFILE 

Brown    &    Sharpe   Mfg.    Co..   Providence. 

Can.    Fairbanks-.Morse    Co..    Montreal. 

Poss  &  Hill  Machy.    Co..   Montreal. 

Garlock-Walker   Machinei-y   Co.,    Toronto     Ont 

Garvin  Machine  Co.,   New  York 

H.   W.  Petrie.  Toronto. 

Pratt  &   Whitney  Co.,    Dundas,    Ont. 

Riverside   Machinery    Depot.    D«troit,    Mich. 
MILLING    TOOLS 

Aikenhead    Hardware    Co..    Toronto,    Ont. 

Broivn   &  Sharpe   .Mfg.   Co..   Providence. 

Ford-Smith    Mach.    Co..    Hamilton     Ont 

Geometric  Tool   Co..   New    Haven.   Conn. 

Kempsmith   Mfg.    Co.,    .Milwaukee.    Wis 

Tabor  .Mfg.   Co.,   Philadelphia,   Pa. 
MINE  CARS 

Can.    Fairbanks-.Morse    Co.,    Montreal. 

Cummings  &  Son,  J.   W.,  New  Glasgow,   Canada 

Jenckes    .Mach.    Co.,    Sherbrooke,    Que. 

.MacKinnon.    Holmes   Co.,   Sherbrooke. 

Marsh    &    Henthom,    Belleville     Ont 

Modem    Tool   Co.,    Erie,    Pa. 

Pratt   &    WTiilney  Co.,    Dundas,   Ont. 

Sheldons,    Ltd.,    Gait,    Ont, 
MINING  MACHINERY 

Can.    FairbanksJMorse   Co.,    Montreal. 

Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.   of  Canada,  Toronto 

Jenckes    Mach.    Co.,    Sherbrooke.   Que. 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Ltd..    .Montreal. 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto, 
«.^™_S;,,5''"'""^  .Machy.   Co.,  Toronto. 
MITTENS 

Hickory   SteelGrip    Glove   Co.,    Chicago     HI 
MORTISING  MACHINES 

Canada    Machinery    Corp..     Gait,    Ont. 

Garlock-Walker   Machinery   Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 

New   Britain    Mach.   Co..    New  Britain.    Conn. 
MOTORS,   ELECTRIC 

Cm.    FairbanksJMorse    Co..    Montreal. 

Dominion   Machinery   Co.,   Toronto. 

Garlock-Walker    Machinery    Co.,    Toronto     Ont 

Lancashire  Dynamo  &   Motor  Co..   Ltd..  Toron'n 

H.    W.    Petrie.    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

R.    E.    T.    Pringle,    Ltd..    Toronto,    Ont. 

A.    R.    Williams  .Machy.    Co.,   Toronto. 
MOTORS.    PNEUMATIC 

Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.  of  Canada.  Toronto 

Garlock-Walker    Machinery    Co.,    Toronto     Ont 
MULTIPLE    INDEX    CENTRES 

Garvin   -Machine   Co..   New  York 
NAIL    MACHINERY 

Sleeper  &  Hartley,   Inc.,   Worcester,   Mass. 
NAME   PLATES,   BRONZE.   ETCHED 
AND   STAMPED 

Matthews,  Jas.   H..   &  Co..   PittsbuiKh.   Pa. 

Pritchard-Andrews   Co..   Ottawa,    Can 
NIPPLE  HOLDERS 

CurtiB  &  Curtis  Co.,   Bridgeport,   Conn. 


Co. ,    Montreal. 

The,    Hamilton. 


NIPPLE   THREADING    MACHINES 

John   H.    Hall   &    Sons,    Ltd.,    Brantford,    Ont. 

Landis  Machine  Co.,   Waynesboro,   Pa. 
NITROGEN 

Carter  Welding  Co.,  Toronto,  Ont. 

L'Air  Liquide  Society,  Montreal,  Toronto, 
NUTS,   SEMI-FINISH    AND   FINISHED 

Canadian    B.    K.    Morton,    Toronto.    Montreal. 

Gait   .Machine  Screw   Co.,   Gait,    Ont. 

National-Acme    Co.,    Cleveland,    Ohio. 
NUT   BURRING  MACHINES 

National   Machy.   Co.,  Tiffin.   O. 

Petrie  of  Montreal,   Ltd..  H.   W.,  Montreal,  Que. 
NUT  MACHINES   (HOT) 

National   Machy.    Co.,   Tiffin,  O. 

Petrie  of  Montreal.  Ltd.,  H.   W.,  Montreal,  Que. 
NUT  FACING  AND   BOLT  SHAVING 
MACHINES 

Garvin    Machine   Co.,   New  York. 

National  Machy.   Co..  Tiffin,   O. 

Petrie  of  .Montreal.  Ltd.,  H.   W.,  Montreal,  Que. 

Victor   Tool  Co.,    Waynesboro,    Pa. 
NUT  TAPPERS 

John    Bertram    &    Sons    Co.,    Dundas. 

Canada    MacMnery    Corp..     Gait.    Ont 

Garvin   Machine   Co.,   New  York. 

Greenfield  Tap  t&  Die  Corp.,  Greenfield.  Moss. 

Hall,   J.    H.,   &  Son,    Brantford,    OnU 

A.    B.  Jardine  &  Co..  Hespeler. 

Landis    Machine   Co.,    Waynesboro,    Pa. 

National    .Machy.    Co.,  Tiffin,  O. 

Petrie  of  Montreal,  Ltd.,  H.   W.,  Montreal.  Que. 
OIL.     DRAWING 

Ehn  Cutting  Oil  Co..   Toronto,  Ont 
OIL    SEPARATORS 

Can.    Fairbanks^Morse 

Sheldons.    Ltd..    Gait.    Ont 

Smart -Turner   Machine   Co.. 
OIL  STONES 

Aikenhead   Hardware   Co.,    Toronto,   Ont. 

Carborundum    Co..    Niagara    Falls,    N.Y. 

Norton  Co..   Worcester.    Mass. 
OIL   STORAGE   SYSTEMS 

Bowser   &    Co.,    Inc.,    S     F.,    Toronto.    Ont 
OSCILLATING   VALVE   GRINDERS 
(PNEUMATIC) 

Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.  of  Canada,  Toronto 
OVENS    FOR    BAKING.    BLUING,    DRYING, 
ENAMELING,   JAPANNING   AND 
LACQUERING 

Brantford    Oven    &    Rack    Co..    Brantford,    Ont 

Oven  Equipment  &  Mfg.  Co..  New  Haven.  Conn. 

WTiiting  Foundry  Equipment  Co..  Harvey.   111. 
OVEN   TRUCKS,  STEEL 

Brantford   Oven    &    Rack    Co..    Brantford.    Ont 

MacKinnon.  Holmes  &  Co..  Sherbrooke.  Que. 

Oven   Equipment  &  Mfg.   Co.,    New   Haven.   Conn. 

Whiting   Foundry   Equipment  Co..   Harvey,   111. 
OVENS    FOR    DRYING,    TEMPER   AND 
UNDER    TRUCKS 

Brantford    Oven    &    Rack    Co.,    Brantford.    Ont 

Oven  Equipment  &  Mfg.  Co.,  New  Haven,  Conn. 
OXY-ACETYLENE  WELDING  AND 
CUTTING 

Can.    Welding  Works,   Montreal.  Que. 

Carter    Welding    Co..    Toronto.    Ont 

Prcst-O-Lite  Co..   Inc..  Toronto,   Ont. 

St.    Lawrence    Welding  Co..    .Montreal.    Que. 

Toronto    Welding   Co.,    Toronto,    Ont. 
OXY-ACETYLENE  WELDING  AND 
CUTTING   PLANT 

Carter   Welding    Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 

L'Air   Liquide  Society,    Montreal.    Toronto. 

Prest-O-Lite    Co.,    Inc..   Toronto.   Ont. 
OXYGEN    (SEE  ACETYLENE) 
PACKINGS,    ASBESTOS 

Bennett,  W.  P..  61  .Montford  St..  Montreal,  Que. 

Cleveland   Wire  Spring  Co..  Cleveland. 

New  Britain  .Mach.  Co..  New  Britain.  Conn. 
PACKINGS,  LEATHER,  HYDRAULICS, 
ETC. 

Graton  &  Knight  Mfg.  Co.,    Worcester.   Mass. 

William    R.    Perrin.    Ltd..    Toronto. 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto. 
PAPER  MILL  MACHINERY 

Bertrams.   Ltd.,   Edinburgh.  Scotland. 

MacKinnon,   Holmes  &   Co.,  Sherbrooke,  Que. 

Sturtevant  Co.,   B.   F.,  Gait,   Ont. 
PATTERN  SHOP  EQUIPMENT 

Canada    Machinery    Corp..     Gait,    Ont 

Fos    Machine    Co.,   Jackson,    Mich. 

Garlock-Walker    Machinery   Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 
PATENT    SOLICITORS 

Budden,   Hanburj',   A.,   Montreal. 

Fetherstonhaugh  &   Co.,    Ottawa. 

Marion  &  Marion,  Montreal. 

Ridout  &  Maybee,  Toronto. 
PATTERNS 

Winnipeg  Gear  &  Engr.   Co.,   Winnipeg,   Man. 
PERFORATED    METALS    AND 
ORNAMENTAL    IRON    GOODS 

Can.ida  Wire  &  Iron  Goods  Co.,  Hamilton. 
PIG  IRON 

Hanna   &   Co..   M.    A..   Cleveland.   O. 

Steel  Co.  of  Canada.  Ltd..  Hamilton.  Ont. 
PIPE  CUTTING  AND  THREADING 
MACHINES 

Butterfleld   &   Co.,    Rock   Island.    Que. 

Can.    Fairbanks-Morse  Co..   Montreal. 

Curtis   &   Curtis    Co..    Bridgeport.   Conn. 

Dominion  Machinery  Co..  Toronto,  Ont 

Foss   &   Hill   Machy.    Co.,    Montreal. 

Fox   Machine  Co.,  Jackson,  Mich. 

Garlock-Walker    Machinery   Co.,    Toronto,    Ont. 

Garvin   Machine  Co..   New  York. 

John   H.    Hall   &   Sons.   Brantford. 

A.    B.   Jardine  &  Co..   Hespeler.   Ont. 

Landis  Machine  Co.,   Wayne^oro,   Pa. 

R,    MoDougall    Co.,    Gait 

H.   W.    Petrie,  Toronto. 


Wells    Bros.    Co.    of   Canada,    Gait,    Ont 

Williams  Tool  Co.,  Erie,  Pa. 

A-    R.   Williams  Machy.   Co.,  Toronto. 
PIPE   RIVETED   STEEL 

The   Jenckes    Mach.    Co.,  Ltd.,  Sherbrooke,    Que. 

Toronto    Iron    Works.    Ltd.,    Toronto. 
PIPE  CUTTERS,   ROLLING 

Curtis   &   Curtis   Co.,    Bridgeport,   Conn. 

John   H.    Hall   &   Sons,    Ltd..    Brantford,    Ont 

H.   W.   Petrie,   Ltd.,   Montreal. 

Wells   Bros.    Co.    of   Canada,    Gait,    (liii, 
PLANER  JACKS 

Armstrong  Bros.    Tool   Co.,   Chicago, 
PLANERS,  STANDARD  AND  ROTARY 

John  Bertram  &  Sons  Co.,  Dundas. 

Canada    Machinery    Corp.,    Gait,    Ont. 

Can.    Fairbanks-Morse  Co.,   Montreal. 

Dominion   Machinery  Co.,   Toronto.   Ont. 

Foss  &   Hill    Machy.    Co..   Montreal. 

Gardner.  Robt.,   &  Son.  Montreal. 

Garlock-Walker   Machinery  Co..   Toronto.   Ont 

Garvin   Machine   Co..    New   York. 

Hamilton   Machine   Tool  Co..  Hamilton,    Ohio. 

Hill,    Clarke    &    Co..    Chicago.    111. 

Morton   Mfg.   Co.,   Muskegon  Heights,   Mich. 

Niles-Bement-Pond  Co.,    New    York. 

Petrie  of  Montreal,  Ltd.,  H.   W..  Montreal,   Que, 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto. 

Whitcomb-Blaisdell    .Mach.    Tool    Co.,    Worcester, 
Mass. 
PLANING  AND  SHAPING  MACHINERY 

Canada    Machinerj-    Cohl,    Oalt,    Ont. 

Can.   Fairbanks-Morse  Co.,   Montreal. 

Foss   &   Hill   Machy.    Co..    Montreal. 

Garlock-Walker  Machinery  Co..   Toronto.  Ont. 

Garvin   Machine   Co..    New   York. 

Hamilton  Machine  Tool  Co.,   Hamilton,   Ohio. 

Niles-Bement^ond    Co..    New    York. 

Petrie  of  Montreal,  Ltd.,  H.  W.,  Montreal,  Que. 

H.   W.    Petrie,   Toronto. 

Riverside    Machinery   Depot,   Detroit,    Mich. 

Steptoe.  The  John  Co.,   Cincinnati,   Ohio. 

A.  B.   Williams  Machy.  Co.,  Toronto. 

PLANING   MILL   EXHAUSTERS 

Can.    Blower  &   Forge   Co.,    Kitchener,   Ont. 

Sheldons.    Ltd.,    Gait,    Ont 

Niles-Bement-Pond  Co..    New   York. 
PLIERS 

Aikenhead    Hardware   Co.,   Toronto. 

Canadian  Billings  &  Spencer,  Ltd.,  Welland. 
PLUG    MILLERS 

Banfleld,    Edwin   J.,   Toronto. 
PRESSES,    ARBOR 

AUas    Press   Co.,    Kalamazoo,   Mich. 

Hannifin  Mfg.   Co..  Chicago.   HI. 

Metalwood  Mfg.    Co.,   Detroit,   Mich. 
PRESSES,   BROACHING,  FORGING 
AND  FLANGING 

Atlas  Press   Co.,    Kalamazoo,  Mich. 

E.    W.    Bliss  Co.,    Brooklyn.    N.Y. 

Ferracute   Machine   Co..    Bridgeton,    N.J. 

.Metalwood  Mfg.  Co.,  Detroit,  Mich. 

Toledo  .Machine  &  Tool  Co.,  Toledo. 
PRESSES,   CAM,  TOGGLE,  EYELET 

Baird   Machine  Co.,    Bridgeport    Conn. 

Consolidated    Press    Co.,    Hastings,    Mich. 

Toledo   Machine  &  Tool  Co.,  Toledo. 
PRESSES  FOR  SHELLS 

Atlas    Press    Co..    Kalamazoo.    Blich. 

Charles    F.    Elmes    Eng.    Works,    Chicago, 

Dominion   Machinery  Co.,   Toronto,   Ont 

Ferracute  Machine  Co.,   Bridgeton,   N.J. 

Poss   &  Hill    Machy.    Co..    Montreal. 

Gariock-Walker   Machinery   Co..    Toronto,    Ont. 

Metalwood   Mfg.    Co.,    Detroit,   Mich. 

William   R.    Perrin,    Ltd.,  Toronto, 

Petrie  of  ^lontreal.   Ltd.,   H.   W.,  Montreal,   Que 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto. 

We.st   Tire   Setter  Co.,    Rochester,   N.l. 
PRESSES,   FILTER 

William    It.    Perrin.    Ltd.,   Toronto. 
PRESSES,    DROP    AND    FORGING 

W.    H.    Banfleld   &    Son.   Toronto. 

B.  W.   Bliss  Co.,   Brooklj-n.   N.Y. 

Brown     Boggs  Co.,    Ltd.,   Hamdton,   Canada, 

Charies    F.     Elmes    Eng.    Works.    Chicago. 

Can.   Fairbanks^Morse  Co.,   Montreal. 

Brie  Foundry  Co.,  Erie;   Pa. 

Niles-Bement-Pond   Co..    New   York. 

William    R.    Perrin,    Ltd.,    Toronto. 

Petrie   of  'Montreal,    Ltd.,   H.    W.,    Montreal,   Que. 

H.    W.    Petrie,   Toronto. 

Toledo   Machine   &  Tool  Co.,  Toledo. 
PRESSES,  HYDRAULIC 

John  Bertram  &  Sons  Co.,  Dundas. 

Charies   F.    Elmes    Eng.    Works,    Chicago, 

Dominion    Machy.    Co.,   Toronto.    Ont. 

Ferracute  Machine  Co..   Bridgeton.    N.J. 

Metalwood    Mfg.    Co..    Detroit,    Mich. 

Niles-Bement-Pond  Co.,    New   York. 

William    R.    Perrin,    Ltd..    Toronto. 

Petrie  of  Montreal.  Ltd.,   H.   W..  Montreal,  Que. 

Standard   Machv.  &  Supplies,   Ltd.,   .Montreal,  Que. 

H.   W.    Petrie.  Toronto. 

Toledo  Machine  &  Tool  Co.,   Toledo. 

We.st   Tire   Setter  Co..   Rochester,   N.Y. 

A.   R.    Williams  Machy.    Co..   Toronto. 
PRESSES,   PNEUMATIC 

Metalwood   Mfg.    Co.,    Detroit,    Mich. 

Toledo   Machine   &  Tool  Co.,   Toledo. 
PRESSES,  POWER 

Baird    Machine    Co.,    Bridgeport,    Conn. 

E.    W.    Bliss  Co.,    Brooklj-n.    N.Y. 

Brown,    Boggs   Co.,    Ltd.,   Hamilton.   Canada. 

Canada   Machinery  Corp..    Gait.    Ont 

Can.    Fairbanks-Morse   Co.,    Montreal. 

Consolidated   Press  Co.,   Hastings,    Mich, 

Charles    F.    Elmes    Eng.    Works,    Chicago, 

Garlock-Walker   Machinery    Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 

William    R.    Perrin,    Ltd.,    Toronto, 

Petrie  of  Montreal.    Ltd.,    H.    W..   .Montreal,   Que. 

H.    W.    Petrie,   Toronto. 

Riverside  Machinery   Depot.   Detroit,   Mich, 

Toledo  Machine  &  Tool  Co.,  Toledo. 

A.    R.    Williams  Machy.   Co.,  Toronto. 


September  6,  1917. 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  N    -M  A  C  H  I  N  E  R  Y 


Silver^; New  25  Drilling  Machine 

Designed  to  withstand    the    hardest    usage    and    at    the    same 
time  maintain  its  high  degree  of  accuracy. 

Eight  Spindle  Speeds 
Six  Positive  Geared  Feeds 
High  Carbon  Crucible  Steel  Spindle 
Two  Quick  Return  Levers 
Automatic  Feed-stop  and  Instant  Release 
Frame  is  rigid  and  symmetrical  in  design 
Tapping  attachment  is  the  very  embodiment 
of  simplicity  and  strength 

We  should  be  pleased  to  send  you  specifications  and  price% 

The  Silver  Mfg.  Company 


290  BROADWAY 


SALEM,  OHIO 


£ioth 


)/  every  description 


We     iiiike     Machinery 

Guards  of  all  kinds. 

Metal  Lockers  for  Clothes 

Steel    Shelving  for   all 

purposes. 

Drop  alineforfull  details. 


CANADA  WIRE  & 
IRON  GOODS  CO. 

HAMILTON.     ONTARIO 

Eastern  Representatives: 
H.E.Bull.     184ManceSt. 
lontreal.  P.Q 


No  Vibration  at 
=^12,000  R.P.M. 

Floor  or  Bench  type.  This  great  speed  can  be  maintained  for 
drilling  up  to  3/16".  %"  may  be  drilled  at  slower  speeds.  The 
no  friction,  no  vibration  features  are  effected  through  the 
ail-ball-bearing  construction,  and  automatic  belt  stretch  ab- 
sorber. Built  in  1.  2.  3.  4  and  6-spindIe  floor  types.  It  not 
only  increases  the  speed,  but  minimizes  breakage  of  drills,  be- 
cause the  hole  is  drilled  out.  not  pushed  through.  An  inquiry 
would  secure  you   bulletins  and  full  information. 


The  DeMooy 

Machine 
Company 

Cleveland     -     Ohio 


1-..       V      -.^-^     ^ 


//   any   advertisement   interests   you,    tear  it   out   now   and   place    with  litters  to  be  answered. 


164 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


PRESSES,  BALING 

William   R,    Peirin,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 
PRESSES,  SPRING  FOOT 

Brown    Boggs  &  Co..  Hamilton,  Ont 
Consolidated    Press    Co.,    Hastinga,    Mich. 
Toledo   Machine   &   Tool  Co.,   Toledo. 
PRESSES,  SCREW  „     „  ,j     ,„ 

Barnes,    W.    F.,    &   John,    Co.,    Roclrford,    111. 
Ferracute    Mach.    Co.,    Bridgeton,    N.J. 
William   R.    Perrin,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
PRESSES,   TRIMMING 
Consolidated    Press    Co.,    Hastings,    Mich. 
Erie   Foundry  Co..  Erie,  Pa. 
Ferracute   Mach.   Co.,    Bndgeton,   N.J. 
PROPELLERS  __,         ^  „       J     r>„, 

Kennedy   &  Sons.    Wm.,   Owen  Sound,    Ont. 
PULLETS 

American   Pulley   Co.,    Philadelphia. 
Baird   Machine   Co.,    Bndgeport,    Conn. 
Bernard    Industrial  Co..   Fortiertille,   Qne. 
Brown   &   Sharpe   Mfg.    Co. ,    Providence    .K.I. 
Can.  Bond  Hanger  &  Cplg.  Co.,  Alexandria,  Ont. 
Can     Fairbanks-Morse    Co..    Montreal. 
Dominion  Machy.   Co^  Toronto,  Ont 
The  Jenckes  Mach.    Co.,    Ltd.     Sherbrooke.    Qut. 
Wm.   Kennedy  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Owen  Sound,  Ont. 
Petrie  of  Montreal.   Ltd.,   H.   W..  Montreal,  Que. 
H     W.    Petrie,   Toronto.  ,    ,      „. 

Positive  Clutch  &   PuUey  Works,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Standard  Machy.  &  Supplies,   Ltd..   Montreal,   Que. 
The    Smart-Turner  iMach.    Co.,    Hamilton. 
A     R     Williams    Machy.   Co..    Toronto. 
PULLEYS,  FRICTION  CLUTCH 
American    Pulley    Co.,    Philadelphia. 
Baird    Machine  Co.,    Bridgeport,    Conn. 
Petrie  of   Montreal,   Ltd.,   H.   W.,   Montreal,   Que. 
TT    W    Petrie,   Toronto.  „ 

PMitive  Clutch  &   Pulley  Works,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Bernard  Industrial  Co..  A.,  FortdemUe,  Que. 
PULLEY  MACHINERY, 
DRILLING   AND   TAPPING 
Can.    Fairbanks-Moree    Co.,    Montreal. 
Cincinnati    Pulley    Machy.    Co.,    Cincmnati.    Ohio. 
Wells  Bros,   of  Canada,   Gait,  Ont. 
PUMPS    AIR 

The    Jenckes   Mach.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Sherbrooke.    Quo. 
Smart-Turner   .Mach.   Co.,    Hamilton. 
PUMPS,  CENTRIFUGAL 

BowsS-  &  Co.,    Inc.,   S     F..  Toronto,   Ont 
Can.   Blower  &  Forge  Co.,   Kitchener,   Ont. 
Can.    IngersoU-Band    Co.,    Sherbrooke.    Que. 
H.    W.    Petrie,   Toronto. 
Pratt  &   Whitney  Co.,    Dundas,   Ont. 
Sheldons,   Ltd.,   Gait,    Ont. 
iSmart -Turner   Mach.    Co..    Hamilton. 
Sturtevant  Co.,    B.    F.,   Gait,   Ont. 
PUMPS,  FUEL  OIL  .      „  . 

Bowser  &   Co.,    Inc..    S.    F..    Toronto,    Ont. 
Trahem    Pump  Co.,   Bockford,    111. 
PUMPS,   HIGH   PRESSURE 

Blake    Pump    &   Condenser   Co.,    Fitchbuig,    .Mass. 
Charles    F.    Elmes    Eng.    Works.    Chicago. 
William   R.    Perrin,    i.td.,    Toronto. 
Smart-Turner    Mach.   Co..    Hamilton. 
PUMPS,  ALL  KINDS 

Blake    Pump    &   Condenser    Cc.    FitchburB,    Mass. 
Can.    Blower   &    Forge  Co.,    Kitchener,    Ont. 
Charies   F.    Elmes   Eng.    Works,   Chicago. 
William  R.    Perrin,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 
H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto. 
Smart-Turner   .Mach.   Co.,    Hamilton. 
A.    R.   Williams  Machy.  Co.,   Toronto. 
PUMPS,   HYDRAULIC 

Blake    Pump   &    Condenser  Co.,    Fitchburg,    Mass. 
Charles   F.    Elmes    Eng.    Works,    Chicago. 
Metalwood   .Mfg.    Co.,    Detroit,    Mich. 
Smart  Turner   .Mach.   Co.,    Hamilton. 
William  R.   Perrin,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
PUMPS,  LUBRICANT,  OIL 

Bellevue   Industrial   Furnace  Co.,   Detroit,    Mich. 
Bow.wr   &   Co.,    Inc.,    S.    F.,   Toronto,    Ont. 
Roper,   C.    F..  Co.,   Hopedale,  Mass. 
Trahem  Pump  Co.,   Bockford,  111. 
PUMP   LEATHERS 

Can     B     K.    Morton.   Toronto,   MontreaL 
Graton   &    Knight    Mfg.    Co.,   Worcester,    Mass. 
PUMPS,    ROTARY,    POWER    DRIVEN 

Bowser   &   Co.,    Inc.,    S.    F.,    Toronto,    Ont.        • 
Trahem   Pump   Co.,    Rockford,    111. 
PUNCHES   AND   DIES 

W.    H.    Banfleld    &    Sons,    Toronto. 
E.    W.    Bliss    Co.,    Brooklyn,    N.Y. 
Brown,    Boggs    Co..    Ltd..    Hamilton.    Canada. 
Can.    Blower   &    Forge    Co,    Kitchener.    Ont. 
Ferracute    Mach.    Co.,    Bridgeton.    N.J. 
Can.    Fairbanks-Morse    Co.,    Montreal. 
Gardner,  Robt.,  &  Son,  Montreal. 
A.    B.   Jardine  &  Co.,   Hespeler,   Ont- 
MuUiner-Enlund    Tool    Co.,    Syracuse.    N.Y. 
Petrie   of   Montreal,   Ltd.,   H.   W.,    Montreal,   Que. 
H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto. 
Pratt  &  Whitney  Co.,   Dimdas,  Ont. 
Toledo   Machine   &   Tool   Co.,   Toledo,   O. 
PUNCHES,   POWER 
John   Bertram  &  Sons  Co.,  Dundas. 
E     W.    Bliss   Co.,    Brooklyn,    N.Y. 
Brown,    Boggs   Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton.    Canada. 
Canada    -Machinery    Corp.,    Gait,    Ont, 
Consolidated   Press   Co.,   Hastings,   Mich. 
Ferracute    Mach.    Co.,    Bridgeton,    N.J. 
Niles-Bement-Pond   Co.,    New    York. 
PUNCHING  MACHINES,  HORIZONTAL 
Bertrams,    Ltd.,    Edinburgh.    Scotland. 
John   Bertram  &   Sons  Co.,    Dundas. 
Canada  'Machinery  Corp.,    Gait,    Ont. 
E.    W.    Bliss    Co.,    Brooklyn.    N.Y. 
Blown,    Boggs   Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Canada. 
Niles-Bement-Pond   Co.,   New   York. 
W     .\.    Whitney   Mfg.    Co.,    Rockford,    HI. 
PURIFYING   AND  SOFTENING 
APPARATUS 

Scaife  &   Sons  Co.,    Wm-    B.,   Pittsbuigh,    Pa. 
PYROMETERS 
Bellevue  Industrial  Furnace  Co.,   Detroit,  Mich. 
Can.  Hoskins,  Ltd,,  WalkerviUe,  Ont 
Holz,   Herman  A.,  1  Madison   Ave.,   New  York. 


Shore  Inatnunent  &  Mfg.  Co.,  New  York  City. 

H.   E.  Streeter.  New  Birks  Bldg.,  Montreal,  Que. 

Taylor   Instninient   Co.,    Rochester,    N.Y. 

Tbwing   In^tniment   Co.,   Philadelphia,   Pa. 
QUARTERING    MACHINES 

John    Bertram   &   Sons  Co.,   Dundas. 

NUe.s-Bement-Pond   Co.,    New    York. 
RAILING,  IRON  AND   BRASS 
(SEE   GUARDS) 
RAIL   BENDERS 

Niles-Bement-Pond   Co.,    New   York. 

RAILROAD   TOOLS  _      , 

Can.    Fairbanks-Morse    Co..    Montreal. 
Gumming  &  Son,  J.   W..  New  Glasgow,  Canada. 
Niles-Bement-Pond    Co.,    New    York. 

RAILS,    STEEL  ^,  „        . 

Cumming  &  Son,  J.   W..  New  Glasgow,  Canada. 

RATCHETS 

Keystone    Mfg.    Co.,    Buffalo,    N.Y. 
RAW   HIDE   PINIONS    (SEE   GEARS) 
REAMER    FLUTING   MACHINES 

GaiTin    Machine   Co..    New    York. 
REAMERS,   ADJUUSTABLE 

Can.    Fairbanks-.Morse    Co..    Montreal. 
Cleveland    Twist    Drill    Co.,    Cleveland. 
Morse  Twist  Drill  &  .Mch.  Co.,  New   Bedfoitl,  Ma.s.s. 
Osbom    (Canada),    Ltd.,    SamX    Montreal,    Que. 
Pratt    &    Whitney    Co.,    Dundas,    Ont 
Standaid  Machy.  &  Supplies,  Ltd..  Montreal,  Que. 
H     E    Streeter.   New  Birks  Bldg..   Montreal.   Que. 
W'hitman  &  Bames  Mfg.  Co.,  St.  Cathailnes,  Ont. 
REAMERS,    BRIDGE,   EXPANDING 
AND   HIGH   SPEED 

Aikenhead    Hardware    Co.,   Toronto. 
Buttcrfleld    &    Co.,    Rock    Island,    Que. 
■Can.    Fairbanks-.Morse    Co..    Montrea  . 
Clark    Equipment   Co..    Buchanan,    Mich. 
Cleveland    Twist   Drill    Co.,    Cleveland. 
lUinois    Tool    Works,    Chicago,    111. 
Morse  TwLst  Drill  &  -Mch.  Co..  New   Be<lf™-.1.  .Ma.". 
McKenna    Brothers.    Pittsburgh.    Pa. 
Osbom    (Canada).    Ltd.,    Sam'l.    Montreal.    Que. 
Pratt   &   Whitnev  Co..    Dundas,    Ont. 
R.    E,    T.    Pringle,    Ltd.,    Toronto.    Onl. 
REAMERS,    PIPE.  CYLINDER 
AND   LOCOMOTIVE 

Buttertleld    &    Co.,    Rock    Island,    Que. 
Can.    Fairbanks-Morse   Co.,    Montreal. 
Cleveland    Twist   Drill    Co      Cleveland 
Jlorse  Twist  Drill  &  Mch.  Co.,  New   Bedfoixl.  Ma.-s. 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Toronto. 
Pratt    &    Whitney    Co.,    Dundas,    Ont 
REAMERS,   STEEL  TAPER 
AND   SELF-FEEDING 
Buttcrfleld   &   Co.,    Bock   Island,   Que, 
Can      Fairbanks-Morse    Co.,    Montreal. 
Clark    Equipment    Co.,    Brchanan.    -Mich. 
Cleveland    Twist    Drill    Co.,    Cleveland. 
Illinois    Tool    Works.    Chicago.     111. 
A.    B.   Jardine  &   Co..   Hespeler    Ont 
Morse  Tivist   Drill  &  Mch.  Co.,  \.-w    He.lfnrd,  .\^i.-.«. 
H     W.    Petrie.    Toronto. 
Pratt    &    Whitney    Co..    Dundas,    Ont 
REAMING  MACHINES.   PNEUMATIC 

Cleveland    Pneumatic    Co.    of    Canada,    Toronto. 
Gariock-Walker   Machinery   Co.,   Toronto,   Ont. 
RECORDING    INSTRUMENTS 
Bristol    Co..    Waterbury     Conn. 
Taylor  Instniment  Co.,    Rochester.    N.Y. 
REGULATORS,    PRESSURE, 
TEMPERATURE 

Can      Fairbanks-Morse    Co..    Montreal. 
Taylor    Instrument    Co.,    Rochester,    N.Y. 

RESPIRATORS  ^,      ,      ,     n, 

Strong.    Kennard    &  Nutt    Co..    Cleveland.    Ohio. 

RIVET  MACHINES  .^        ^     r. 

BUton     Mach.    Tool    Co..    Bndgeport,    Conn. 
Can.    Blower   &    Forge    Co..    Kitchener     Ont 
Grant   Mfg.    &    Machine   Co..   Bndgeport,   Conn. 
National    .Machinery    Co..    Tiffin.    O. 
H.    W.    Petrie,    Ltd..    Montreal. 
RIVETS,  TUBULAR,  BIFURCATED 
Parmenter   &    Bulloch   Co..    Gananoque. 
Steel    Co.    of  Canada.    Ltd..    Hamilton.    Ont 
RIVETS,   IRON,   COPPER   AND   BRASS 
\ikenhead    Hardware    Co.,    Toronto.    Ont 
Parmenter  &   Bulloch  Co..    Gananoque. 
Sleel    Co,    of   Canada,    Ltd..   Hamilton,    Ot 
RIVETERS.    PNEUMATIC,    HYDRAULIC, 
HAMMER,    COMPRESSION 

Can      Fairbanks-Morse    Co..    Montreal. 
Can.    IngersoU-Rand    Co..    Montreal. 
Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.  of  Canada,  Toronto 
Gariock-Walker   Machinery  Co.,   Toronto,   Ont. 
Independent    Pneumatic    Tool   Co.,    Chicago,    111. 
Niles-Bement-Pond    Co..     New    York 
H.    W.    Petrie.    Toronto. 
R.    E.    T.    Pringle,    Ltd.,   Toronto.    Ont. 
RIVETING  MACHINES,   ELASTIC 
ROTARY  BLOW 

Grant   -Mfg.    &   Machine  Co..    Bndgeport,   Conn. 
High-Speed   Hammer  Co.,    Rochester,    N.Y. 
F.    B.    Shuster  Co.,    New   Haven,   Conn. 
ROLLS.    BENDING    AND    STRAIGHTENING 
John    Bertram    &   Sons   Co..    Dundas 
Brown,    Bogts    Co.,    Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Canada. 
Canada    -Machinery    Corp.,    Gait.    Ont. 
Niles-Bement-Pond    Co.,    New    York 
Toledo  Machine  &  Tool  Co.,   Toledo,   O. 
ROLLS,    CRUSHING 

The  Jenckes  Mach.  Co..   Ltd.,  Sherbrooke,  Que. 
RUBBER  MILL  MACHINERY 

Bertrams,     Ltd.,     Edinburgh,    Scotland 
RULES  „       „      .. 

Brown  &   Sharpe  Mfg.    Co.,   Providence 
James  Chesterman  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Sheffield,   Eng. 
L.    S.    Starrett   Co.,    Athol,    Mass. 


Volume  XVIII 


SAFETY  APPLIANCES 

Stiong,    Kennaid  &  Nutt  Co.,   Cleveland,   Ohio. 
SAFETY   APPLIANCE   GOGGLES 

T.    A.    Wilson,    Beading,    Pa. 
SAND  BLASTS 
Curtis   Pneumatic  Machinery  Co.,   St   Louis,  Mo. 
The  Jenckes   Mach.   Co.,    Ltd.,  Sherbrooke,   Que. 
SANDING  MACHINES 

Canada    Machinery    Corp.,    Gait,    Out. 
SAW  MILL  MACHINERY 

Can.     Fairbanks-Morse    Co.,    Montreal. 
Canada    Machinery    Corp.,    Gait,    Ont. 
Dominion   Machy.    Co.,    Toronto.    Ont 
Gardner,    Robt,   &   Son,   Montreal 
Curtis    Pneumatic   Machy.    Co.,    St    Louis,    Mo. 
H.    W.    Petrie,    Ltd.,    Montreal 
H,    W.    Petrie.    Toronto. 
A.    R.    Williams    Machy.    Co.,   Toronto 
SAWS,  CIRCULAR  METAL 

Hunter    Saw    &    Machine    Co.,    Pittsburg,    Pa. 
Napier    Saw    Works,    Springfield,     .Ma-ss. 
Tabor    Mfg.    Co..     Philadelphia,     Pa. 
SAWS,  HACK   (SEE  HACK  SAWS) 
SAWS,    INSERTED-  TOOTH 

Hunter    Saw    &    Mach.    Co.,    Pittsbuish,    Pa. 
Napier    Saw     W^orks,     Springfield,     Mass. 
Tabor   Mfg.    Co.,    Philadelphia,    Pa. 
SAWS,  BAND  AND  COPING 

Napier    Saw    Works.    Springfield,    Mass. 
SCLEROSCOPES 

Shore    Instnunent    &    Mfg.    Co.,    New   York    City 
H.    E.    Streeter,    New  Birks  Bldg.,  Montreal,   Que, 
SCREW  MACHINE  PARTS 

Johnson    Mach,    Co.,    Carlyle,    Manchester.    Conn. 
SCREW  MACHINE  PRODUCTS 
Gait   -Machine  Screw   Co....  Gait,    Ont. 
Eastern    Mach.    Screw    Corp..    New    Haven,    Ci,nn. 
SCREW  MACHINES,  HAND,  AUTOMATIC 
Brown   &   Sharpe  Mfg.    Co.,   Providence,    R.I. 
Can.    Fairbanks-Morse    Co.,    Montreal. 
Foster    Machine    Co.,    Elkhart,     Ind. 
Gariock-Walker   -Machy.    Co.,   Ltd..   Toronto,    Ont. 
Garvin    Machine   Co.,    New    York 
Himoff  Mach.   Co..   Inc.,   Astoria.   L.I.,   New   loll;. 
A.    B.    Jardine   &   Co.,    Hespeler 
New  Britain   -Machine  Co,,  New   Britain,   Conn. 
Petrie  of  Montreal.  Ltd.,  H.   W.,   Montreal,  Que. 
H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto. 
Pratt    &    Whitney    Co.,    Dundas.    Ont 
Bivett  Lathe  &   Grinder  Co.,   Brighton,   Mass. 
Warner  &  Swasey  Co..   Cleveland,   O. 
A.    R.    Williams   -Machy.    Co.,   Toronto 
SCREW   MACHINES,   AUTOMATIC, 
MULTIPLE  SPINDLE 

New   Britain    Machine   Co.,    New   Britain,    Conn, 
Riverside    Machinery    Depot,    Detroit,"  Mich. 

SCREWS 

Can.    B.    K.    Morton,    Toronto.    Montreal 

Gait   Machine   Screw  Co.,   Gait,   Ont 

National-.icme     Co.,     Cleveland,     Ohio 

Steel    Co.    of   Canada,    Ltd.,    Hamilton,    Ont. 
SCREW  PLATES 

Butterfleld    &    Co.,    Bock   Island,   Que. 

A.    B.    Jardine   &   Co.,    Hespeler 

Morse  Twist  Drill  &  Mch.  Co.,  New   Bedford,  Ma.ts. 

Wells    Bros.    Co.    of    Canada,    Gait,    Ont. 
SCREW   SLOTTERS 

Garvin    Machine  Co..    New   York 

Pratt    &    Whitney    Co.,    Dundas,    Ont 
SECOND-HAND  MACHINERY 

Davis   Machine   Tool  Co.,    W.    P.,   New   York 

Dominion    Machinery    Co.,    Toronto 

Foss   &    Hill    Machy.    Co.,    Montreal 

HUl,   Clarke    &   Co.,   Chicago.    111. 

MoCabe,    J.    J.,    New   York,    N.Y. 

New   York   Machinery   Exchange,    New   York 

II.    W.    Petrie.    Toronto. 

Riverside    -Machinery    Depot.    Detroit,    Mich. 

Strelinger  Co.,    Chas.    A..    Detroit,    Mich, 

Stocker-Rumely-Wachs,    Chicago,    111. 

SET  SCREWS.  SAFETY 

Aikenhead    Hardware    Co.,    Toronto,    Ont 

Allen    Mfg.    Co.,    Hartford,    Conn. 
SHANKS,  STRAIGHT  AND  TAPER 

Jacobs   -Mfg.    Co.,   Hartford,   Conn. 
SHAPERS 

John    Bertram    &   Sons   Co..    Dundas 

Can.    Fairbanks-Morse   Co.,    Montreal 

Canada    Machinery   Corp.,    Gait.    Ont, 

Foss    &    Hill    Machy.    Co.,    Montreal 

Gardner,    Robt,    &    Son,    Montreal 

Hendey    Machine  Co.,   Torrington,   Conn. 

Hamilton    Mach.    Tool    Co..    Hamilton.    Ohio 

Petrie  of  Montreal,  Ltd.,   H.    W.,   Montreal,   Que. 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto 

Rhodes    Mfg.     Co.,     Hartford,    Conn. 

Steptoe   Co.,    John,    Cincinnati,    Ohio 
SHAFTING 

Can.  Bond  Hanger  &  Coup.  Co.,  Alexandria,  Ont. 

Can.    Fairbanks-Morse    Co..    Montreal 

Can.    Drawn    Steel    Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont 

Gariock-Walker   Machy.    Co..    Ltd.,   Toronto.    Ont. 

The  Jenckes  Mach.   Co.,    Ltd..   Sherbrooke.    Que. 

Niles-Bement-Pond    Co..    New    York 

H.    W.    Petrie.    Toronto 

Pratt    &    Whitney    Co..    Dimdas.    Ont 

Strelinger  Co.,   Chas.    A.,    Detroit,   Mich. 

\.    R.    Williams  Machy.   Co.,  Toronto 
SHARPENING   STONES 

Carborundum   Co.,    Niagara    Falls,    N.Y. 

Norton    Co.,    Worcester,    Mass. 
SHAVINGS.   SEPARATOR 

Can     Blower  &  Foifre  Co.,   Kitchener,   Ont 

Sheldons,    Ltd.,     Gait.    Ont 
SHEARING   MACHINES,    ANGLE    IRON. 
BAR  AND  GATE 

John   Bertram   &   Sons  Co.,   DundM 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


165 


The    Way    to    Greater   Production Use 


Tapper 
Vertical 


Tap  Breakage  cease.?  to  be  an  annoyance  and  a 
retarder  of  production  where  the  R-S  Tappers 
are  in  use — cut  breakage  down  to  a  minimum. 
Along  with  this  a.sset  they  have  exceptional 
speed  and  do  a  high-class  of  work. 

We  have  a  range  of  tappers  for  tapping  of  all 
kinds — from  .3-16"  to  %  .  Our  range  includes 
ilie  Bench.  A^ertical  and  Horizontal  types. 

RICKERT  -  SHAFER  COMPANY 

ERIE.  PA.,  U.  S.  A. 
This  is  Our  Address — How  Can    We  Serve  You? 
ALFRED  HERBERT,  Foreign  Agent. 
COVENTRY.  ENGLAND 


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(( 


A  Model  Foundry" 


is  the  name  of  our  new  36-page  book  describing  each 
department  of  the  foundry  and  general  method  followed 
in  laying  out  a  complete  plant.  A  typical  layout  is 
given,  list  of  equipment  and  numerous  illustrations. 
Send  for  a  copv  to-day. 


Cranes 
of  all 
Types 


.Catalogs 
on 
Request 


Increased  Production  Means  Increased  Profits 


Large     Millers 
for  large  work 
— STEPTOE 
MILLERS 
for  small  work. 


ed    production :    less    money 
ry,    and    increased  profits. 


Large    Planers 

for  large  work 

—STEPTOE 

S  H  A  P  E  R  S 

for  small  work. 

THE  JOHN  STEPTOE  COMPANY 

CUMMINSVILLE,         CINCINNATI,  OHIO,  U.S.A. 

Representatives:    Garlock-Walker   Machinery   Co..    Toronto.    Ont. 


//   any   advertisement   interests   you,    tear  it    out   now   and  place   with  letters  to  be  a-^swered. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


Bertrams.    Ltd.,    Edinburgh.    Scotland 

Canada    Machinery    Corp..    Gait,    Ont. 

A.    B.    Jardine   &   Co.,    Hespeler,    Ont. 

Monteomery,   Smith  &  Co.,   Keynsham,   Somerset, 
Ens. 

Niles-Bement-Pond    Co.,     New    York 

Toledo    Machine    &    Tool    Co.,    Toledo 
SHEARS.    POWER 

John    Bertram   &    Sons   Co.,    Dundas 

Bliss,    E.    W.,    Co.,    Brooklyn.    N.Y. 

Bromi.    BoKBS    Co..    Ltd..    Hamilton.    Caiiala. 

Can.    Blower    &    Forge. Co.,    Kitchener,    Ont. 

Canada    .Machinery    Corp.,    Gait.    Ont. 

Feirachute    Machine    Co.,    Bridgeton,     N.J. 

National    Machy.    Co.,    TifTin,    Ohio. 

Nilcs-Bement-Pond    Co.,     New    Yorl; 

H.    W.    Petrie.    Ltd..    Montreal 

H.    W.    Petrie.    Toronto 

Tolcilo    Machine    &    Tool    Co.,    Toledo 
SHEARS.  -PNEUUMATIC 

Toledo    Machine    &    Tool    Co.,    Toledo.    Ohio. 
SHEARS.   SQUARING 

Brown,     Boggs    &    Co.,    Hamilton.     Canada* 
SHEET    METAL    WORKING    TOOLS 

Bairl    .Machine   Co..    Bridueiioit.    Conn. 

Bliss,    E.    W.,    Co.,    Brooklyn,    N.Y. 

Brown,    Boggs    &    Co.,    Hamilton,     Canada 

Peck,    Stow    &    Wilcox,    Cleveland,    O. 

.Stfcl   Bending   Brake  \\  oi lis,  Ltd.,  Chatham.   Ont. 
SHEET    METAL    ST.\MPINGS 

Dominion    Forge    :.;    Stpg.    Co..    Walkervillc,    Ont. 
SHELL    BANTUiNG    MACHINES, 
HYDRAULIC 

Chapman    'rouble   Eall-Bearing  Co.,   Toronto,    Ont. 

Garlock- Walker   Machy.   Co.,   Ltd.,   Toronto,   Ont. 

The    jenokes   .Mach.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Sherbrooke,    Que. 

Metalwood   Mfg.    Co.,    Detroit,   Mich. 

Perrin,    Ltd.,    W.    R.,    Toronto,    Ont. 

West   Tire   Setter   Co.,    Rochester,    N.Y. 
SHELL    PAINTING    MACHINES 

Can.   Blower  &  Forge  Co.,  Kitchener,  Ont. 

Sheldons,   Ltd.,   Gait,  Ont. 
SHELL   RIVETERS 

Grant   Mfg.    &  'Machine  Co.,    Bridgeport.    Conn. 

High   Speed   Hammer  Co.,    Rochester,    N.Y. 
SHRAPNEL    SHELL    MARKER 

Brown,     Boggs    &    Co.,    Hamilton,    Canada 

Noble    &    Westbrook   Mfg.    Co.,    Hartford,    Conn. 
SIDE   TOOLS 

Armstrong  Bros.   Tool  Co.,  Chicago.  , 

Baxter  &   Co.,   Ltd.,  J.   R.,  Montreal,  Qne. 

Can.   B.   K.  Morton.  Toronto,  Montreal. 
SIGNS.    ENAMEL 

Strong.  Kennard  &  Nntt  Co.,  Cleveland,  Ohio. 
SILVER    SOLDER 

Geo.  H.  Lees  &  Co..  Hamilton,  Ont. 
SKATE    SHARPENERS 

Can.   Bond  Hanger  &  Cplg.  Co..   Alexandria.   Ont. 
SLEDGES 

Aikenhead  Hardware  Co.,    Toronto,    Ont. 

Whitman  &  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St,  Catharines,  Ont. 
BLOTTERS 

Garvin  Machine  Co.,  New  York. 

National-Acme  Co.,  Cleveland,   Ohio. 

Niles-Bement-Pond     Co..     New    York 

Rhodes  Mfg.   Co.,   Hartford,   Conn. 
SMOKESTACKS 

The  Jenckes  Mach.   Co.,  Ltd.,  Sherbrooke,  Que, 

MacKinnon,    Holmes  Co.,    Sherbrooke,   Que. 
SOCKETS 

Brown   &  Sharpe  (Mfg.   Co.,    Providence. 

Clark   Equipment  Co..    Buchanan,   Mich. 

Cleveland    Twist    Drill    Co.,    Cleveland. 

Keystone    Mfg.    Co.,    Buffalo,    N.T. 

Modern    Tool   Co.,    Brie,    P«. 

Morse  Twist  Drill  &  .Mch.  Co..  New   Bcflford.  -Ma.ss. 

J.  H.    WiUiams  &  Co.,  Brooklyn,  N,Y. 
SOCKET    HEAD    CAP    SCREWS 

.\llen    Mfg.    Co..    Hartford,    Conn. 
SOLDERING    IRONS 

Aikenhead    Hardware   Co..    Toronto,    Ont. 

Brest -O-Lite    Co..    Inc.,    Toronto,    Ont. 

Brown.    Boggs    &    Co..    Hamilton,    Canada 
SOLDERS 

Aikenhead    Hardware   Co.,    Toronto,    Ont. 

Tallman   Brass   &    Metal  Co.,   HamUton. 
SPECIAL    MACHINERY 

Baird    Machine    Co.,    Bridgeport,    Conn. 

Banfleld,    Edwin    J..    Toronto. 

Baufleld,    W.    H..    &    .Sons,    Toronto. 

Bertram.   John,    &   Sons   Co.,    Dundas. 

Bliss.    E.    W.    Co.,    Brooklyn,    N.Y. 

Brown.     Boggs    &    Co..    Hamilton.    Canada 

Can.    Fairbanks^lorse   Co..    Montreal. 
■  Charles    F.    Elmes    Eng.    Works,    Chicago. 

Ferracute   Mach.    Co.,    Bridgeton.    N.J. 

Garlock-Walker  Machy.    Co..   Ltd.,   Toronto,    Out. 

Garvin  Machine  Co.,  New  York. 

Gooley  &  Edlund,   Inc.,  Courtland,  N.Y. 

Grant   Mfg.    &  Machy.    Co..   Bridgeport,  Conn, 

John   H.    Hall    &   Sons,    Brantford. 

Gray  Mfg.   &   Mach.   Co.,   Toronto,    Ont. 


A.    B.   Jardine   &   Co.,   Hespeler.    Ont 

The  Jenckes  Mach.    Co.,   Ltd.,   Sherbrooke,   Qu« 

.MCCIean   &    Son.    F.    W..    Niagara    Falls,    Ont. 


Mulllner  &   Enlund  Tool   Co.,    Syracuse,   N.Y. 
Presto-Lite    Co.,    Inc..    Toronto,    Ont. 
Rhodes  Mfg.    Co.,   Hartford,   Conn. 
Riverside  Machinery  Depot,  Detroit,  Mich. 
Sleeper    &    Hartley,    Inc..    Worcester.    Mass. 
Smart-Turner  Machine  Co.,   Hamilton.   Ont. 
T.    C.    .M.    Mfg.    Co.,    Harrison,    N.J. 
Victoria   Foundry   Co..    Ottawa.    Ont. 
William   K.    Perrin,    Ltd..    Toronto. 
Winnipeg   Gear   &   Engr.    Co.,   Winnipeg,   Ma 
SPRINGS.    MACHINERY 
Barnes.    Wallace    Co.,    Bristol,    Conn. 
Can.  Steel  Foimdries,  Ltd.,  Montreal,  Que. 


SPRING    COILING    AND    WINDING 
MACHINERY 

Baird    .Machine    Co..    Bridgeport,    Conn. 

Garrin    Machine    Co..    New    York. 

Sleeper   &    Hartley.    Inc.,    Worcester,    Mass. 
SPRING    MAKING    MACHINERY 
(AUTOMATIC) 

Baird    Machine    Co.,    Bridgeport,    Conn! 

Sleeper    &    Hartley.    Inc..    Worcester,    Mass. 
SPIRAL    CONVEYORS 

Can.  -Matthews  Gravity  Carrier  Co.,  Toronto,  Ont. 
SPROCKETS,    CHAIN 

Grant   Gear   Works,    Boston,   Mass. 

Moiae   Chain   Co.,    Ithaca,    N.Y, 

Philadelphia    Geai    Works,    Philadelphia,    Pa, 
SOLDER 

Jobbora.    Geo.    A..    Hamilton,    Ont. 
SPROCKET    WHEELS,    CAST 

Perriu.     Wm.     R.,    Toronto, 
STAIRS,    IRON 

Canada   Wire  &   Iron   Goods  Co.,    Hamilton.    Ont. 
STAMPINGS 

Dillon    .Mfg.    Co.,    Oshawa,    Ont. 

Dom.    Forge    &    Stamping    Co.,    W.alkerville,    Ont. 

Homer    &    Wilson,    Hamilton,     Ont. 
STAMPING    MACHINERY 

Brown,     Boggs    &    Co.,    Hamilton,    Canada 

Canada    .Machinery    Corp..    Gait.     Ont. 

Ferracute    Mach.    Co.,    Bridgton,    N.J. 

Noble   &    Westbrook    Mfg.    Co.,    Hartford,    Conn. 
STAMPS.    STEEL   ALPHABET.    FIGURES 

Matthews,    Jas.    H.    &  Co.,    Hartford,   Conn. 

Noble   &   Westbrook   .Mfg.    Co.,    Hartford,    Conu. 

Pritchard- Andrews   Co..    Ottawa,   Can, 
STAPLE    MACHINES 

Sleeper    &    Hartley,    Inc.,    Worcester,    Mass. 
STEAM    SEPARATORS    AND    TRAPS 

Can.    Fairbanks  .Moree   Co.,    Montreal. 

Can.    .Morehe»d    Mfg.   Co.,    Wooilstock,    Ont. 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto 

Sheldons,    Ltd.,    Gait,    Ont. 

The    Smart-Turner    Machine    Co.,    Hamilton. 

Sturtevant    Co.,    B.    F.,    Gall,    Ont. 
STEEL    ALLOY    (SEE    ALLOY    STEEL) 
STEEL    BENDING    BRAKES 

Steel  Bending  Brake  Works.   Ltd..   Chatham.   Ont. 
STEEL    FOR   AXES.    PLOWS.   SAWS. 
DRILLS.    ETC. 

Coloui.d    Steel    Co.,    Pittsburgh.     I'a. 
STEEL.   CARBO.X.  FERRO-TUNGSTEN 

Can.   B.   K,   Morton.  Toronto.  Montreal. 

Colonial    Steel    Co.,    I'ittsburgb.    Pa. 

Latrobe    Electric    Steel    Co..    Latrobe,    Pa. 

Osbom    (Canada),    Ltd.,    Sam'l,    Montreal,    Que. 

Vanadium- Alloys    Steel    Co.,    Pittsburgh.    Pa. 

Vulcan   Crucible   Steel  Co.,   Aliquippa,    Pa. 

Zenith  Coal  &   Steel   Products,   Montreal,   Que. 
STEEL.    COLD    ROLLED 

Can.    ilrawn   Steel  Co..    Hamilton,    Ont 

Union    Drawn    Steel    Co,.    Hamilton,    Out. 
STEEL    DRUMS 

Smart-Turner   Machine    Co.,    Hamilton,    Ont 
STEEL    PRESSURE    BLOWERS 

Can.    Blower  &   Forge  Co.,    Kitchener,   Ont 

Can.    Fairbanks-Morse   Co.,    Montreal. 

Sheldons,    Ltd.,    Gait,    Ont 

Sturtevant   Co.,    B.    F.,    Gait,    Ont, 
STEEL.    HIGH    SPEED 

Armstrong  Whitworth  of  Canada,   Ltd.,   Montreal 

Can.    Fairbanks-Morse   Co.,   Montreal. 

Can.    B.    K.    Morton,   Toronto,   -Montreal. 

Century   Steel   Co.    of   America,   New   York 

Colonial    Steel    Co.,    Pittsburgh,    Pa. 

H.    A.    DruiT  Co..    Ltd.,    Montreal. 

Eagl^  &   Globe  Steel  Co..    .Montreal.    Que. 

Fairley   Davidson   Steel   Co.,    New    York,   N.Y. 

Hawkridge    Bros.    Co.,    Boston,    Mass. 

Latrdbe    Electric    Steel  Co.,    Latrobe,    Pa. 

Marshall   &   Co..   Geo.   A..    Toronto,   Ont. 

Osbom    (Canada),   Ltd.,    Sam'l,    Montreal,    Que. 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto 

Stndard    Allays  Company,    Pittsburgh,    Pa. 

Vanadium- Alloys    Steel   Co.,'  Pittsburgh,    Pa, 

Vulcan  Crucible  Steel  Co..  Aliquippa,  Pa.:  repre- 
sented in  Canada  by  Norton.  Callaid  &  Co.. 
Montreal.    Que. 

Zenith    Coal   &    Steel    Products.    .Montreal,    Que. 
STEELS.     HIGH     STRENGTH.     HOT-WORK- 
ING.   DIE.    MAGNET 

Fairley    Davidson    Steel   Co.,    New    York,    N.Y. 
STEEL.     VANADIUM 

Drury,    H.    A.,    Co..  'Jlontreal.   Que. 

Standard    Alloys   Co.,    Pittsburgh,    Pa. 

Vanadium-Alloys    Steel    Co.,    Pittsburgh,    Pa. 

Vulcan  Crucible    Steel   Co..    Aliquippa,    Pa. 
STELLITE.    HIGH-SPEED    TOOL    METAL 

Deloro   Smelting   &   Refining   Co.,   Toronto,    Out. 
STOCK    RACKS    FOR    BARS, 
PIPING,    ETC. 

.New    Britain    Machine   Co.,    New    Britain,    Conn. 
STOCKS    FOR    DIES 

Wells   Bros.   Co.    of  Canada,    Gait,    Ont 
STOCKS,    PIPE 

Butterfleld   &  Co,,    Rock    Island,    Que. 

W.  lis    Bros.    Co.    of   Canada,    Gait,    Ont. 
STOOLS,    STEEL,    SHOP 

New    Britain    Machine   Co..    New   Britain,   Conn. 
STRAIGHTENING    MACHINERY 

Baird    Machinery    Co..    Bridgeport,    Conn. 
Bertrams.    Ltd.,    Edinburgh,    Scotland. 
SWITCHES,     RAILWAY 

Can.    Steel    Foimdries,    Ltd.,    Montreal. 
TACK    (DOUBLE    POINT)    MACHINES 

Sleeper    &    Hartley,    Inc..    Worcester,    Mass, 
TANKS,    GASOLINE    AND    OIL 

Bowser   &   Co,    Inc.,    S.    F..   Toronto,   Ont. 


Dominion    Forge    &   Stamping    Co.,    Walkerville, 

The   Jenckes   Mach.    Co.,    Ltd.,    Sherbrooke,   Que. 

MacKmnon.    Holmes   &    Co.,    Sherbrooke,    Que. 
TANKS.    STEEL.    WATER    PRESSURE 

Bowser  &   Co.,    Inc.,    S.    F.,    Toronto.    Ont. 

Can.    Welding  Works,   Montreal,    Que, 
Jenckes  Machine   Co.,   Sherbrooke,   Que. 

.MacKinnon,   Holmes  Co.,   Sherbrooke. 

St.    Lawrence    Wi'ldiug   Co..    Moutix?al.   Que. 

Toronto  Iron  Works,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 
TANK    WAGONS 

Jenckes  Mach.   Co..   Sherbrooke.  Que. 

.MacKinnon.  Holmes  Co.,  Sherbrooke. 

Toionlo   Iron  Works,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 
TAPES.    MEASURING 

James  Chesterman   &  'Co.,   Ltd.,  Sheffield,  Eng, 
TAPPING    MACHINES    (PENUMATIC) 

Clevtland   Pneumatic   Tool   Cn.   .-.f  ran.,    Tuiotilo 
TAPPING    MACHINES    AND 
ATTACHMENTS 

Bertram,    John.    &   Sons  Co.,    Dundas. 

Canada    Machinery    c;orp.,    Gait,    Ont. 

Garvin    Machine    Co.,    New    York. 

The    Geometric   Tool   Co.,    New   Haven. 

J.    H.   Hall  &  Sons,   Brantford,  Ont. 

A.    B.    Jardine   &   Co.,    Hespeler,    Ont. 

Landis   -Machine  Co.,    Waj-nesboro,    Pa. 

-Manufacturers  Equipment  Co.,  Chicago,   111. 

.Modem   Tool   Co.,   Erie,   Pa. 

.Murchey  Machine  &  Tool  Co.,  Detroit. 

Niles-Bement-Pond     Co.,     New    York 

Petrie  of   Montreal,    Ltd.,   H.    W.,   Montreal,   Que, 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto 

Rickert-Shater    Co.,    Erie,    Pa. 

L.   S.    Starrett  Co.,   Athol,   Mass. 

Whitney  Mfg.  Co..    Hartford,  Conn. 
TAPS,     ADJUSTABLE 

Baxter  Co.,  Ltd.,  J.  R.,   Montreal,  Que. 

Geometric  Tool   Co.,   New  Haven. 

.Manufacturere   Equipment  Co.,  Chicago,   111. 

.Murchey  Machine  &  Tool   Co.,   Detroit 

Nalional-Acme  Co..    Cleveland.    Ohio. 

Osbom    (Canada),    Ltd.,    Sam'l,    Montreal.    Que. 
TAPS,    COLLAPSIBLE 

Geometric  Tool  Co.,  New  Haven. 

.Manufacturers    Equipment   Co..  Chicago,    IH. 

.Modem    Tool    Co.,    Erie,    Pa. 

-Murchey  .Machine  &  Tool  Co.,  Detroit. 

Osbom    (Canada),    'Ltd.,    Sam'l,    Montreal,    Que. 

Victor  Tool   Co.,   Wa>-nesboro,   Pa. 
TAPS,    DIES    AND    WRENCHES 

Butterfleld   &  Co..    Rock  Island,    Que. 

Can.   Faii*ank3-Morse  Co.,   Montreal. 

Cleveland    Twist    Drill    Co.,    Cleveland. 

Foss  &  Hill  Machy.  Co.,  -Montreal. 

Geometric  Tool  Co.,  New  Haven. 

A.   B.   Jardine  &  Co.,   Hespeler,   Ont. 

Landis   Machine   Co.,    Waynesboro,    Pa. 

Morse  Tivist  Drill  &  Mch.  Co.,  New   Betlford,  Mass. 

.Murchey  .Machine  &  Tool  Co.,  Detroit 

O.shom    (Canada).    Ltd.,    Sam'l.    Montreal,    Que. 

Petrie  of  Montreal.   Ltd.,  H.  W.,  Montreal,  Que. 

H.    W.    Petrie.   Toronto. 

Pratt  &    Whitiuy    Co..    Dundas,    Ont. 

L.    S.    Stanett  Co..   Athol,   Mass. 

Wells   Bros.    Co.    of  Canada,   Gait,   Ont. 
TAP    EXTENSIONS 

Allen   .Mfg.    Co..   Hartford.   Conn. 
TESTING    INSTRUMENTS 
METALLURGICAL 

Shore   Instrument    &    Mfg.   Co..   New   York   <'ilv. 
THERMOMETERS,    ALL    KINDS 

Taylor  lu.stnimriit   Co.,    Rochester,   N.Y. 

Bellcvue   Industrial    I'umace  Co.,    Detroit.    Mich. 
TESTING    LABORATORIES 

Can.    Inspection   &   Testing   Lab..   Montreal.    Que. 

Toronto   Testing   Laboratory,   Toronto. 
THREAD-CUTTING   MACHINES 

Can.    Faii*anks-.Morse   Co.,    Montreal, 

Curtis  &  Curtis  Co.,   Bridgeport,   C^onn. 

Gariock-Walker  Machy.    Co..   Ltd.,   Toronto.   Ont. 

Geometric  Tool   Co.,   New  Haven. 

Landis  Machine  Co.,  Waynesboro,  Pa. 

.National-Acme  Co.,  Cleveland,   Ohio. 

National     Mach*-     Co.    Titlin.    (  lu^.. 

H.    W.   Petrie,  Toronto. 

Pratt  &   Whitney  Co.,   Dundas,   Ont 

Wells    Bros.    Co.   of  Canada,    Gait,   Ont. 
THRFADING    TOOLS 

Landis  Machine   Co,.   Waynesboro,   Pa. 

Kivett    Lathe    &    Grinder    Co..    Brighton,    .Ma.ss. 
THREAD    MILLING   MACHINES 

Gray  Mfg.    &    Mach.    Co..    Toronto,  Ont. 

Taft -Pierce  Co,    New   York,    N.Y. 

T.  C.    -M.    Mfg.   Co..   Harrison,   N.J. 
TINSMITHS'   TOOLS 

Brown.    Boggs    &    Co.,    Hamilton,    Can. 

Peck,   Stow  &   Wilcox,   Cleveland,   Ohio. 
TIRE   SETTING   MACHINES,   HYDRAULIC 

William    R.    Perrin,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 

West  Tire   Setter  Co.,   Rochester,   N.Y. 
TOOL    CASES 

Union    Tool    Oiest    Works,    Rochester.    N.Y. 
TOOL    HOLDERS 

Aikenhead  Hardware  Co.,  Toronto,  Ont. 

Cleveland   Twist  Drill  Co.,  Cleveland. 

.\rmstrong   Bros.   Tool  Co.,   Chicago. 

Can.   B.   K.    Morton,  Toronto,  Montreal. 

Deloro  ^Smelting  &   Refining  Co.,   Toronto,    Ont 

.Modem   Tool   Co.,    Erie,    Pa. 

Pratt  &   Whitney  Co..   Dundas,  Ont. 

J.    H.    Williams  Co.,    Brooklyn,   N.Y. 
TOOL    POSTS,    LATHE 

.\rmstrong  Bros.   Tool  Co.,  Chicago. 
TOOL    ROOM    PARTITIONS 

Canada  Wire  &.  Iron   Goods  Co.,  Hamilton. 
TOOL    STEEL 

Atkins  &  Co..   Wm.,  Sheffield,  Eng. 

.\rmstrong.  Whitworth.   Ltd.  of  Canada,  Montreal. 
•  Can.   Fairbanks-Morse  Co.,  Montreal, 

Can.    B.    K.    Morton,   Toronto,    Montreal. 

Colonial   Steel  Co.,    Pittsburgh,   Pa. 

Deloro  Smelting  &  Refining  Co.,  Toronto,  Ont 

H.   A.   Dmry  Co.,  Montreal. 

Eagle  &  Globe  Steel  Co.,   Montreal.  Que, 


September  6,  1917. 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Hawkridge   Bro''.   Co.,   Boston,   Ma39. 

Latrobe    Electric    Steel    Co,,    Latrobe,    Pa. 

.Marshall   &    Vn..    li.-n.    A  ,    T-'Min..   (in 

Osbom  (Canada),   Ltd.,  Sam'l,  Montreal,  Que. 

H.    W.   Petrie,   Ltd.,   Toronto,  OnU 

.'llet'per   &    Hartley,    Inc..    Worcester,    Mass. 

SwedLih   Steel   &   Importing  Co.,    .Montre-il,   Que. 

Vanadium-Alloys  Steel   Co.,   Pittsburgh,   Pa. 

Vulcan   Crucible  Steel  Co.,    Aliquippa,   Pa. 
TOOLS,   ELECTRIC 

Independent  Pneiunatic  Tool  Co.,  Chicago,  111. 

H.  W.   Petrie.  Ltd.,  Montreal. 

R,   E.   T.   Pringle.   Ltd.,  Toronto,    Ont. 

Stow  Mfg,  Co..   Binghamton.   N.Y. 

A.    R.   Williams   Machinery  Co.,   Toronto. 

United   States  Elec.   Tool   Co.,  Cincinnati,  O. 
TOOLS.    PNEUMATIC 

Can.    IngersoU^Rand   Co.,    Sherbroobe,    Que. 

Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.  of  Canada,  Toronto. 

Curtis   Pneumatic   Machinery  Co..   St.    Louis,   .Mo. 

Garlock-Walker   Machinery   Co.,    Toronto,    Ont. 

Independent   Pneumatic  Tool  Co.,   Chicago.   111. 
TOOLS,    LATHE,    PLANER,   BLOTTER 

.Armstrong  Bros.   Tool  Co..  Chicago. 
TOOLS,    SCREW    MACHINE 

Foster  Machine  Tool   Co,,  Elkhart,    Ind. 
TORCHES,    STEEL 

.\mistrong,    Whitworth    of   Canada.  Ltd.,  Montreal. 

Prcst-OJLite   Co.,    Inc.,    Toronto,    Ont. 
TRACK    SYSTEMS 

Dillon  Mfg.    Co.,   Oshawa,   Ont 

-N'orlhem   Crane  Works,    Walkerrille. 

Whiting  Foundry   EQuipment  Co.,    Han'ey.    111. 
TRANSMISSION   MACHLNERY 

American    Pulley   Co..    Philadelphia,    Pa. 

A.   R.  Williams  Machinery  Co.,  Toronto. 

Can.   Bond  Hanger  &  Cplg.  Co.,  Aleiandria.  Out. 

Can.    Fairbanks-Morse  Co.,  ^lontreal. 

Can.    Drawn  Steel  Co.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 

Hamilton  Gear  &  Machine  Co.,  Toronto. 

Morse  Chain  Co..  Ithaca.   N.T. 

H.    W,    Petrie,    Ltd..  Toronto,    Ont. 

The  Smart-Turner  Machine  Co..   Hamilton. 
TRANSMISSION   TOWERS 

Curtis   Pneumatic   Machinery  Co.,  St,   Louis,   Mo. 

\ortbtm   Crane   Works.    Walkerrille. 

Tallman   Bra-ss   &   Metal  Co.,   Hamilton. 
TROLLEYS 

Wright   .Mfg.    Co.,   Lisbon,   Ohio. 
TRUCKS,    FACTORY,   FREIGHT,   ETC. 

Canada    .Machinery    Corp.,    Gait,    Ont. 

Chapman   Double   Ball   Bearing  Co..   Toronto. 

Whitiui;    FoiindiT    Equipment   Co..    Harve.v,    111. 
TRUCKS,    LUMBER    AND    KILN 

.Sheldons,   Ltd.,   Gait.    Ont. 

Northern   Crane   Works,    Walkcrvjlle. 
TUBING,  SEAMLESS,  BRASS  &  COPPER 

Standard   Tube   &   Fence    Co.,    Woodstock,    Ont. 
TUBING    COILERS,    FLEXIBLE   METAL 

Sleeper   &    Hartley,    Inc.,    Worcester,    Mass. 
TUMBLING    BARRELS 

Baird    Machine    Co..    Bridgeport.   Conn. 

Northern    Crane   Works.   Walkenille. 

Whiting    FoundiT    Equipment   Co..    Harvey.    111. 
TUNGSTEN    FILAMENT   COILING 
MACHINERY 

Sleeper   &   Hartley,    Inc.,    Worcester,    Mass. 
TURNBUCKLES 

Canadian   Billings  &   Spencer,   Lt/i.,   Wclland. 
TURNTABLES 

Whiting  Foundrv   Equipment  Co, .  Harvey,   111. 
TURRET    MACHINES 

Bron-n    &   Sharpe    Mfg.    Co..    Providence 

Garlock-Walker  Machinery   Co.,  Toronto,   Ont. 

New  Britain   Machine  Co.,   New  Britain.   Conn. 

H.   W.   Petrie,   Ltd.,  Toronto,   Ont. 

Pratt  it  Whitney,  Hartford,  Conn. 

Riverside    Machinery    Depot,    Detroit,   Mich. 

Warner  &   Swasev,  Cleveland.   O. 

Oarvin    Machine   Co..    New   York. 
TURBINE  WATER  WHEELS 

Jenckes   Mach.    Co..   Sherbrooke.   Que. 

Wm.    Kenne.Iv   &    Sons.    Ltd..    Owen    Sound,   Out. 
UPS'=:TTING  AND  BENDING 
MACHINERY 

.Tobn    Bertram    &    Sons    Co..    Dunri.is 


Brown,   Boggs  Co.,   Ltd.,   Hamilton,   Canada. 
A.    B.   Jardine  &   Co.,    ne.speler.    Ont. 
National  iMachy.  Co.,  Tiffin,   0. 
Canada   Machinery   Corp.,    Gait,    Ont. 
Niles-Bement-Pond  Co.,   New  York, 
Jenckes  Mach.  Co.,  Sherbrooke,  Que, 
Petrie  of  .Montreal,  Ltd.,   H.  W.,   .Montreal,   Qu 
H.   W.   Petrie,   Ltd.,  Toronto,  Ont. 
A.  R.  Williams  Machy.  Co.,  Toronto. 
VACUUM    PUMPS 


VALVE    LEATHERS 

Can.    B.    K.    Morton,   Toronto,   Montreal 

Gralon  &   Knight  Mfg.  Co..  Montreal. 
VALVE    GRINDERS    (PNEUMATIC) 

Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co.  of  Canada.  Toronto 
VALVES,   FOOT 

Smart-Turner   Machine  Co.,   Hamilton,   Ont. 
VALVES,    HYDRAULIC 

Charles   F.    Elme.s   Eng.    Works.   Chicago,   111. 

Melalwood   Mfg.    Co.,    Detroit,   Mich. 
VALVES,    BACK    PRESSURE.    STEAM 

Shfldnns,    Limited.    G.alt,    Ont. 
VENTILATING    APPARATUS 

Brantford  Oven  &  Rack  Co.,  Brantford.   Ont. 

Cjin.   Blo^-er  &  Forge  Co.,  Kitchener,  Ont. 

.Sheldons.   Limited,   Gait,   Ont. 

H.    W.   Petrie.  Toronto. 

Sturtevant   Co.,    B.    F.,   Gait,    Ont. 

A.   R.   Willi.%ms  Machy.   Co.,  Toronto. 
VISES,    AIR    OPERATED 

Hannifin  Mfg.    Co.,    Chicago,    Dl, 
VISE    STANDS,    PORTABLE 

New  Britain   Machine  Co.,  New  Brit.ain,  Conn. 
VISES,   BENCH 

.\ikenhead   Harflware  Co..    Toronto.    Ont. 

Becker  Millintr  Machine  Co..   Boston,  Mass, 

Foss   &   Hill  Machy.    Co.,    Montreal. 

New   Britain   Machine   Co..   New   Britain,   Conn. 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Ltd.,    .Montreal. 

TT.    W.    Petrie.  Toronto. 
VISES.  PIPE 

.Vikenhead   Hardware   Co..    Toronto.    Ont. 

ButlcrfleH    &   Co.,    Rock    Mand.    Que. 

Veil,    Brm.    Co.    of   Canada.    Gait.    Ont. 

.1.    H.   Williams   S  Co..    Brooklyn.   N.T. 
VISES.    PLANER    AND    SHAPER 

.^ikenhead  Hardware  Co..   Toronto,   Ont. 

Skinner  Chtick  Co..   New  Britain,   Conn. 
WASHER    MACHINES 

National    Machy.    Co.,    Tiffin,    Ohio. 
WASHERS 

Barnes.    Wallace,    Co..    Bristol,    Conn. 

Dillon    Mfg.    Co..    Oshawa.    Ont. 

Graton   &   Knight   'Mfg.    Co..    Worcester.   Mass. 

London    Bolt   &    Hinge   Works.    London,    Ont. 

Steel  Co.  of  Canada.  Ltd..  H.amilton.  Ont, 
WATER  PTTRIPY'ING  AND  SOFTENING 
APPARATUS 

Wm.  B.  Scaife  &  Sons  Co..  Pittsburgh.  Pa. 
WATER    CINDER    MILLS 

Whiting    Foundry    Equipment    Co..    Harvey.    111- 
WATER    JACKETS 

Can.    Welding    Works,    -Montre.il.    Que. 
WATER    TOWERS 

Tlie   .Tenckes   M.ach.    Co..    Ltd.,   .Sherbrooke,   Que. 

Toronto    Iron    Works,    Ltd..    Toronto. 
WATER    WHEEIS 

The   .Tenckes   Mach.    Co.,   Ltd.,    Shertirooke,   Que. 

Wm.    Kennedy   &   Sons,   Ltd..   Owen   Rotmd.    Ont- 

Sleeper  &  Hartley,   Inc..   Worcester.   Mass. 

WELDINGS,  ELECTRIC 

S'.    Lawrence    Welding    Co.,    Montreal.    Que. 

WELDING   MASKS 

Strong.    Kennard   &    Nutt  Co..   Cleveland,    Ohio. 
WELDERS,    ELECTRIC,    SPOT, 
BUTT,    ETC. 

National   Electric  Welder  Co..   Warren,   O. 
Tabor   Mfg.    Co.,    Philadelphia.    Pa. 
Thom.son    Electric    Welding   Co.,    Lynn,    Mass. 
Winfleld    Electric    Welder    Co..    Warren,    Ohio. 


WELDING,    WORK    AND    SUPPLIES 

( .^utopenous    and    Oxy-Acetylene)    see    OXY- 

ACETYLENE 

WINCHES 

■Tohn    H.    Hall   &   Sons,    Brantford, 

Kennedy  &  Son,    Wm.,   Owen  Sound,   Ont 

Northern   Crane   Works,    WalkenriUe. 
WIRE   COILING   AND    POINTING 
MACHINERY 

Baiid    Machine  Co.,    Bridgeport,    Conn. 

F.    B.    Shuster  Co.,   New   Haven,   Conn. 

Sl..],er   it   Hartley.    Inc.,    Worcester,    .Mass. 
WIRE    CLOTH    .4ND   PERFORATED 
METALS 

Caiiala   Wire   &   Iron   Goods  Co.,  Hamilton. 
WIRE    FORMING    AND 
STAMPING    MACHINERY 

Baird   Machine   Co.,    Bridgeport,    Conn, 

Brown,   Boggs  Co..   Ltd..   Hamilton.  Canada. 

MoClean  &  Son,  F.   W.,  Niagara  Falls,  Ont. 

F.   B.    Shuster  Co..  New  Haven.  Conn. 
WIRE  N.\ILS 

Pamicnter  &  Bulloch  Co..   Gananoquc. 

Steel   Co.   of  Canada.   Ltd..   Hamilton.   Ont. 
WIRE  NAIL  MACHINERY 

.National   .Machy.   Co..   Tiffin.   Ohio. 

Sleeper   &    Hartley.    Inc.,   Worcester.    Mass. 

.\.  R.  Williams  Machy.  Co.,  Toronto, 
WIRE  STEEL,  BRASS,  COPPER. 
BRONZE 

Still   Co.    of  Canada,  Ltd..   H,im31ton.    ■' 
WIRE   RAILS 

.Slceiu-r  A:    Hartley,    Inc.,   Worcester,    Mass. 
WOOD    BORING    MACHINES 

Canada  .Machineiy  Corp..    Gait,    Ont 

Cleveland  Pneumatic  Tool  Co,  of  Canada,  Toronto, 

Garlock-Walker  iMachinerv   Co..   Toronto,    Ont. 

Petrie  of  Montreal,  Ltd.,  H.  W.,  Montreal.  Que. 

H.    W.    Petrie,  Toronto. 
WIRE    STRAIGHTENERS    AND    CUTTERS 

Baird    Ml,    i  i.      i  liridgeport    Conn. 

Bro\™,    r.  L       I     ,      I.. I.,    Hamilton.   Canada. 

F.    B.    .Sim,!,  I    ■■,.,    New   Haven,   Conn. 

Sleeper   it    Hartley.    Inc.,    Worcester,    Mass. 
WOODWORKING    MACHINERY 

Canada  Machinery  Corp.,   Gait,   Ont 

Can.    Fairbanks-Morse    Co.,    Montreal, 

Can,     Ingersoll-Rand    Co.,    Sherbrooke,    Que, 

Garlock-Walker  Machinery   Co.,   Toronto,   Ont 

New  Britain  Machine  Co.,  New  Britain,  Conn, 

H.    W.    Petrie,    Toronto. 

Petrie  of  .Montreal,  Ltd.,  H.   W..  Montreal,  Que, 

R.    E.    T.    Pringle,    Ltd.,    Toronto,    Out. 

SUver   .Mfg.    Co.,    Salem,    Ohio. 

A.  R.  Williams  Machy.  Co.,  Toronto, 
WOOD    LATHES 

Canada  Machinery   Corp.,    Gait.    Ont 

Garlock-Walker   Machinery   Co..    Toronto.    Ont 

Oliver  Machy.   Co..   Grand   Rapids,   Jlich. 
WORKS    STANDS,    PORTABLE 

New   Britain   .Mach.    Co.,    New    Britain,    Conn, 
WRENCHES 

.\rmstrong    Bros.    Tool    Co..    Chicago.    111. 

Butterfleld    &   Co.,    Rock    Island,    Que. 

Canadian  Billings  &   Spencer.    Ltd.,  Welland. 

Keystone  -Mfg.   Co.,   Buffalo,   N.T. 

Wells    Bras,    of  Canada.    Gait,    Ont. 

Whitman  &  Barnes  JIfg.  Co.,  St  Catharines.  Ont. 
WRENCHES.    AUTOMOBILE    NARROW 
JAW   AND   MONKEY 

I!,  mis  it  Call  Hdwe.  &  Tool  Co..  Springfield,  Mass. 

Whitm,™  it  Barnes  Mfg.  Co..  St   Catharines,  Ont. 
WRENCHES.  PIPE,  MONKEY,  TAP 

.\ikenhead  Hardware  Co.,    Toronto,    Ont. 

Beniis  it  Call  Hdwe.  &  Tool  Co..  Springfield,  Mass, 

Wells   Bras,    of  Canada,    Gait,    Out. 

Whitro.an  it  Barnes  Mfg.  Co.,  St  Catharines,  Ont 
WRENCHES.    RATCHET   AND    BASIN 

Hemis  &  Call  Hdwe.  &  Tool  Co..  Springfield,  Mass. 

K.vst.me    .Mfg.    Co..    Buffalo,    N.T, 

Whitm.an  it  Barnes  Mfg,  Co.,  St   Catharines,  Ont. 
WRENCHES,    SOCKET 

All.n    Mfg.    Co..    Htirtford,    Conn. 


INDEX  TO  ADVERTISERS -Continued  from  page  170 


Racine   Tool  &  Machine  Co 135 

Reed-Prentke    Co,     S7 

Richmond    Mfg,    Co.    .• M 

Rickert-Shafer    Co 165 

Riverside    Machy,    Depot    87 

Rivett  Lathe  Sc  Grinder  Co 16S 

Rookford    Drilling   Mach,    Co 159 

Rockwell   Co..    W.    ,S 150 

Pvoelofson   Machine   &    Tool   Co 23 

Roper  &  Co.,   C.    F 118 


Sebastian    Lathe    Co 151 

Shore    Instniment    &    -Mfg.    Co 149 

Sinister   Co..    P.    B i* 

.Sidney   Tool  Co M 

Silver  Mfg.    Co.    163 

Skinner  Chuck   Co I'lS 

Sleeper    &    Hartley,    Inc 152 


Smart -Tunier    Mach.    Co IW 

Standard    Alloys  Co 17 

Standard   Machy.    &   Supplies,   Ltd..  167 

Standard    Pres.se<I    Steel  Co 121 

Standard  Tube  &  Fence  Co 117 

Sturrctt   Co.,    L.    S 123 

Steel    Co.    of   Canada    3 

Steinic  Turret   Mach.   Co 26 

Stcptoe,    John,    Co 165 

Stocker-Rumley-Wachs    Co 9D 

St    Lawrence  Welding  Co 110 

Stow    Mfg.    Co.     HI 

Strelinger    Co..    Chas.    A 87 

Strong.    Kennaril    &   Nutt    Co..    The.  149 

Sturtevant   Co.    of   Canada,    B,    F...  % 

Swc<li.sh    Steel    it    Importing   Co 7 


Tabor    .Mfg.    Co 

Tate-Jones  &  Co.,   Inc. 
Taylor    Instniment    Co. 


Thomson    Electric    Welding   Co 1^7 

Tliomson    Spot  Welding   Co 107 

Tliwing   ln.stniment   Co Ill 

Toronto    Iron    Works 148 

Trahem   Pump   Co 'I'' 

U 

Cnion   Tool  Chest    Works    M 

rnited    States    Electrical    Tool    Co...    X 
fnitcd   States   Mach.    Tool    130 


Vanadium-Allo.ys    Steel 33 

Victor  -Saw   Works 137 

Victor  Tool  Co 146 

Victoria    Foundry  Co.,   Ltd,    f 25 

Vulcan    Crucible   Steel    Co M 

■w 


Wells    Bros.    Co.    of   Canada 

West   Tire   Setter  Co 

Wheel    Tnieing   Tool   Co 

Whitcomb-Blaisdell  Madi.  Tool  Co.. 
Whiting   Fqnndly   Equijiment  Co.... 

Whitney   .Mfg.   Co 

Wilkinson   &   Kompass   

Williams.  A,  U,.  'Machinery  Co.7.  73, 

Williams  Tool  Co 

Williams  &  Co..  .L  H 

Willsjn  &  Co..   T.   A 

Wilmarth  &   .Morman   Co '. 

Winlaor  Mach.  &  Tool  Works 

Winfleld  Electric  Welding  .Mach,  Co, 
U'innipeg   Gear  &    Engineering   Co.. 

Wing  &   Son,   J.   E 

Electric  Co 


Wiii.-iit     Mfi- 


lib    iv.al    it    Steel    Products   Co...  149 


C-ANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII. 


The    Shortcut  to  Quality  Threads 


The  Improved  Rivett  Thread  Tool  is  an  attach- 
ment for  mountmg  on  the  tool  post  block  of  any 
engine,  lathe. 

It  is  adapted  for  thread  cutting  in  pitches,  six  and 
finer,  in  any  thread  exceptmg  the  square  thread 
and  IS  recommended  for  use  where  exceptional 
accuracy  and  rigid  duplication  are  essential. 

It  is  also  recommended  for  use  in  connection  with 
Tool-Room  work  and  on  straight  production  where 
interchangeability  of  parts  is  necessary. 

Write  for  literature  covering. 


Rivett  Lathe  &  Grinder  Co. 

Brighton  District  of  Boston 
Boston         Mass.        U.S.A. 


CANADIAN  MACHINERY 

AND  MANUFACTURING  NEWS 

A  weekly  newspaper  devoted  to  the  machinery  and  manufacturing  interests. 


Vol.  XVIII.  TORONTO,  SEPTEMBER  6,  1917  No.  10 

EDrrORlAL    CONTENTS 

EDITORIAL   CORRESPONDENCE    265-268 

Co-Partnership — Management  Efficiency  and  Capacity  Losses. . .  .Metric  System  Pros 
and  Cons.  . .  .Heat  Treatment  of  Steel  Forgings.  . .  .Heat  Furnaces  and  Coal  Pits. 

SPOKES  IN  INDUSTRY'S  WHEEL   269 

Chas.  W.  A.  Moore. 
INFLUENCE  OF  RECENT  DEVELOPMENTS  ON  APPRENTICESHIP  SYSTEM,  ...  .270-272 

ENGINEERING  EXHIBITS  AT  CANADIAN  NATIONAL  EXHIBITION    273-275 

EDITORIAL 276 

Constructive   Discontent.  .  .  .Skilled   Mechanics  a  Post- War  Necessity. 

INDUSTRIAL  NOTABILITIES   277 

Lawford  Grant,  C.E. 

RECENT  DEVELOPMENTS  IN  CHUCKING  APPLIANCES 253-255 

GENERAL 256-257 

Precautions  in  Picric  Acid  Works.  . .  .Welded  Ships.  . .  .An  Early  Steamboat.  . .  .Some 
New  and  Growing  British  Industries ....  Th  e  Engineering  Council  of  American  En- 
gineering Societies. 

PROCESSES  IN  MANUFACTURE 258-263 

Welding  With  Application  to  Automobile  Engineering Electric    Steel-Hardening 

Process.  . .  .Coal  Dust  in  Moulding  Sand. 

GENERAL 264 

A  Handy  Safety  Valve  Chart.  .  .  .Tests  for  Oils  and  Vai-nishes. 

SELECTED  MARKET  QUOTATIONS 278-270 

THE  GENERAL  MARKET  CONDITION  AND  TENDENCY 279-284 

Summary.  .  .  .Montreal    Letter Toronto  Letter.  .  .  .Sydney   Letter New  York 

Letter ....  Pittsburgh  Letter. 

INDUSTRIAL  AlfD  CONSTRUCTION  NEWS  (Advtg.  Section)  74 


THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

JOHN  BAYNE  MACLEAN,  Pres.      H.  T.  HUNTER,  Vice-pres.       H.  V.  TYRRELL,  Gen.  Man. 

Publishers  of  Hardware  and  Metal.  The  Financial  Post,  MacLean's  Magazine,  Farmer's  Magazine. 
Canadian  Grocer.  Dry  Goods  Review.  Men's  Wear  Review.  Printer  and  Publisher,  Bookseller  and 
Stationer,  Canadian  Machinery  and  Manufacturing  News,  The  Power  House,  The  Sanitary  Engineer, 
Canadian   Foundryman.   Marine  Engineering  of  Canada. 


Cable  Address :  Macpubco,  Toronto :   Atabek.   London,   Eng. 
PUBLISHED   1887. 

(ANADiAN  Machinery 

*""  Manufacturing  News 

PETER   BAIN,   M.E.,   Editor.  B.    G.   NEWTON.   Manager. 

Associate   Editors:    A.    G.   WEBSTER.   J.    M.    WILSON,   J.   H.    RODGERS. 

CHIEF  OFFICES: 

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GREAT   BRITAIN— LONDON,   The   MacLean    Company  of  Great  Britain,   Limited,   88  Fleet  Street,  E.C..  E.  J.  Dodd.  B 

Director.      Telephone    Central    12^60.      Cable    address :   -Atabek.    London,    England.  s 

UNITED    STATES— New  York,   R.   R.   Huestis,   Room   620,   111  Broadway,  N.Y..  Telephone  Rector  8971:  Boston,  C.  L.  ^ 

Morton,  Room  733.  Old  South  Building,  Telephone  Main   1204.     A.  H.   Byrne,    1104-5-6-7  Fort  Dearborn  Building, 

105  W.  Monroe  St.,  Chicago.  Telephone  Randolph  3234. 
SUBSCRIPTION    PRICE— Canada.    Great    Brit'.in,    Sccth     Africa  and  the  West  Indies,  $3.00  a  year:  United  States. 

S3. 50  a   year:   other  countries.   ?4.00  a   year:  Single   C  jpies.    15    cents.      Invariably   in    advance. 


^A-fly;iife^y^iy^ffli''a?ftffi!^';ffi^^ 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


Volume  XVIII 


First  in  the  field— still  in  the  lead 


Improved 
Screw- cutting 

HENDEY 

Engine  Lathe 

Mounted  quick-change  geariner  was 
first  made  a  coir  niercia!  success  on 
this  type  of  Hendey  Lathe.  It  got 
away  to  a  eood  start  and  still  main- 
tains its  initial  advantages.  Used 
more  tl^an  any  other  quick-change 
lathe  manufactured  —  its  top-notch 
efficiency  holds  the  field. 

Thirty-six  different  threads  and  feeds  are  had  through 
mounted  change  gearing.  Automatic  stop  for  carriage 
worlis  in  either  direction.  Has  host  of  features.  Write 
for  full   particulars. 

Hendey  Machine   Co. 

Torrington,  Conn.,  U.S.A. 

Canadian  Agcnis :  A.  R.  Williams  Machinery  Co..  To- 
ronto: A.  R.  Williams  Machinery  Co.,  260  Princess  St.. 
Winnipeg;  A.  R.  Williams  Machinery  Co.,  Vancouver; 
A.  R.  Williams  Machinery  Co.,  St.  John,  N.B.:  Williams 
&    Wilson,    Montreal. 


12-inch  Lathe 


.\cme    M.1CU.   Co 6 

.\iki-nheacl    Hariware.    Ltd 77 

.\lli-u    Mfg.   Co 162 

.\TOi-rican    PoundiMlien's    .\s.scic 83 

.\merican  'Lead   Pencil    Co 99 

.American    Pulley    Co 112 

Anuatioiig   Bros.   Tool   €o 148 

Ai-mstmng.    Whitvvorlh    iif    Canada...      G 

Atlas    Press   Co 82 

Atkins.    Wm.,    &  Co..    Ltd 15 

Alivora    Tonl    Works     155 

B 

Baiid   Madiine  Co 151 

Banfleld.    E.   J 30 

Bauliekl.    W.    H.,    &  Sons    81 

Barnes   Co..    W.    P.    &   John 1=5 

Barnes.    Wallace.    Co 82 

Bealty    &   .Son.    M ffi 

Eearidry    &    Co Ir 

Beckrr    Millins    Madi.    Co r^i 

F.vV^  111.     Ii.  !  t     '    M    Fimia.-f    Co Ill 

H.  !|.      '    !•    '  '    (■".,    A iii; 

r.i 1         .\   ^"11^  I'".,   i.M.  .     1 


Br-i.lKvfiii.l     Marli.     i     T11..I     Wmfo     .       5 

EliiStol    Comijanv     148 

Browuell    Madiv.    C 85 

Bro-n-n.    Boggs    Co U 

Broira's     Copper     &     Bi-.rss     Rolling 

Mills     KM 

Brown   &   Sharpe    Mfg.    Co 156 

Bildden,    Hanbun'    A 81 

Britterfleld    &    Co..    Inc 147 

C 

Can.    Bond    Hanger   &   Coupling   Co.  118 

Canada    MachineiT    Coi-poi-ation    

Outside  back   cover 

Canada   Metal  Co W 

Canada    Wire    ><t    Iron    Ooo.ls    Cn 163 


INDEX    T  0  A  D  V  E  R  T I S  E  R  S 


Can.    Steel    Foundries.    Ltil V 

Can.   8  K  V  Co..   Ltd 4 

Cai^onnidnm  Co 142 

Carlyle.   Johnson   .Maeb.   Co.    8 

Cai-ter   Welding  Co.    .' I'M 

Centurj-    Steel    Co.    of    America 16 

CJliapman   Double  Ball    Bearing  Co..    9J 

Cincinnati    Electrical    Tool    Co 150 

Cincinnati    Ir-on    &    Steel  Co 28 

Cincirrnati  'Milling  ilach.    Co 127 

Ciiiiimiati     I'lin.v     MaHl,v.     Co 159 

I'-.iil.      V.|   ri.ni -.' 161 

r;          ,   :     \  ',.      .  M 

I     ...                1!    ■     .   .      M       ',       Co 129 

(    1    1  ..,-;    li.ni    •■ 157 

(  ..ji.u.,  i,i.,i    .\.,;,:u,.    Welding  Co..  IOC 

l-unsoli.l.iteil    Press    €0 135 

Cullen     Machv.     Co.,    C.    W 86 

Curtis   it    Curtis  Co 135 

Cnilis    I'lreirmatic   Mach.    Co 130 

Cnslinran     Chuck    Co 151 


I'i.i.  I'.niimonville    Co 106 

11  1.1,    .Machine    Tool    Co..    W.    F...    91 

Ii.  !.ii  i    Smelting   &    Refining   Co 18 

I'      M.".y   Mach.   Co 163 

Ih I.!    Sa.w    &    Stamping   Works..  136 

lii      :      Mfg.    Co 114 

Ii    ■.    I  ill    Iron   &   Wriecking  Co 98 

lii      i.ii    Steel    Foundn'    Co 148 

I'u.i,     i.'o..   H.   A Front  cover 

E 

Eagle   &   Globe   Steel    Co 13 

Eastern   Maeh.    Screw    Corp 146 

Eastenr    JIacby.    &   Eqiripment  Co. . .    ST 

Rim  cutting  Oil  Co »....  134 

Elmes    Engr-.    Works.    Charles    F 124 

Erie    Foundry    Co 125 


r  .  .  -::...-    :i...:.     l..  10 

Fi-ti.r    Machine    Co 35 

Foss   &   Hill   Machy.    Co 

Inside  back  cover 

Pox   Mach.   Co 128 

Francis    &    Co 151 

G 

Gait    Machine    Screw    Co.,    Ltd 93 


Co. 


161 


Gar-dner  ^lach 
Garlock-Walkev    .Mach, 

Gar-rin  Machine  Co.   IM 

Geometric    Tool    Co y. 75 

Gilbert  &   Barker  Mfg.    Co 1C9 

Goolcy   &    Edlrrrrd.    Inc 21 

Grant   Gear    Works.    Inc 150 

Grant    Mfg.    &    .Machine    ''o 124 

Gr-aton  &    Knight    Mfg.    Co 119 

Greenfield    Machiire   Co 138 

Hall    &    Sons.    Ltd.,    John    H 131 

Hamilton    Gear  &   Machine  Co 116 

Hamillon   Machine  Tool   Works 31 

Hanna  &  Co.,  M.  A 6 

Hannifin  Mfg.    Co 145 

Hardinge    Bros 29 

Hawkridge  Bros 80 

Hendev    .Machine    Co 170 

Hepburn.    John    T.    20 

Hill.  Clarke  &  Co 89 

Himoff  Mach.   Co M.  151 

HiircWev    Maeh.    Works    150 

Holz.    Herman    A ISO 

Homer   &    Wilson    93 

Hoyt    Metal    Co 152 

Hnrlbut-Rogei-s    Maehiiiei-y    Co 151 


Illinois    lool    Works    79 

Independent  Pneumatic   Tool   Co,    .,  1^)^ 
Iron   Works.   The    80 

J 

.Tacohs    Mfg.    Co 144 

.Tardine  &  Co..    A.    B 9^ 

Jenckes  Mach.  Co 9 

.Tobbom.    Geo.    E 81 

.Johnson    Mach.    Co.,    Carl.vle 8 

Joyce   Co..    Geo.    A. ISO 

K 


L 


106 


L'.\ir    Liquide    Society     — 

Landis    Machine    Co 149 

Latrobe   Electric    Steel  Co 14 

Ijc.Elond    Mach.    Tool  Co 13 

Lowry.    E.    A 8B 

Lynd-Fai-qrihar    Co 84 


M 


.Ma>-l.ean\     -MaBazine     92 

.MaoNab    .Ma. In.    Co..    John 32 

.Manufactnni^    Equipment    Co 144 

.Marion   &    .Marion    81 

Marsh    &    Herithonr,    Ltd 141 

Matthews.    Jas.    H..    &    Co.,    Inc....  38 

.MaCabc.    J.    J !S 

.MoCo^•-B^arrdt  Machy.    Co 86 

McDougall  Ca.    H — Inside  back  cover 

McLaren.    J.    C    Belting  Co 148 

.McKinnon    Dash    Co 88 

.Mechanical    Eugmeerirrg    Co WM 

Mctalwood    Mfg.    Co '..  125 

Millers    Palls    Co.    IB' 

Moder-n    Too!    Co 143 

Monarch    Brass    Mfg.   Co 93 

Morton    uMfg.    Co    81 

Mrdliner-Edlrrnd   Tool   Co 29 

Murchey   Machine    &    Tool   Co 146 

Naaiier    Saw    Works.    Inc 133 

National    Acme  Co 38 

New   Britain   .Machirre  Co.    .'1 

New   York    Machinerj-    Esohange 88 

Nicholson    File    HB 

Niles-Bement-Pond Inside    front    cover 

Noble    &    Westbrook    1S| 

.\or-them    Crane    Works    IBO 

Norton,    A.    O !«' 

Nor-ton    Co 38 

Norton    Grinding  Co. 


Scotia  Steel  &  .Coal  Co.. 


Packard  Fuse  Co 

Par-menter  &  Bulloch  Co 1 

Peerless  'Machine   Co 1 

Perrin,    Wm.    R 1 

Petrie  of  iMontreal,  H.   W 

Petrie.    H.    W..    Ltd 

Philadelphia    Gear   Works    1 

Poison    Iron    Works.    Ltd 

Port   Hope    File   Mfg.    Co 

Positive   Clutch   &  Pulley   Works 1 

Pratt  &   Whitney Inside  front  coi 

Presto-Lite  Co.,  Inc : 

Puro  Sanitary  Drink'g  Fountain  ,Co. 


Continued  on  page  167 


CANADIAN    MACHINERY 


McDougall  Shapers 

These  are  up-to-date  Shapers, 
designed  for  modern  shop 
production. 

They  are  plain  in  design,  yet 
embody  all  essential  features 
necessary  for  efficient  work. 

E\'ery  adjustment  is  conveni- 
ent for  the  operator  and  fine 
for  the  most  accurate  work. 

Let  us  have  your  inquiry. 

The  R.  McDougall  Company 
Limited 

Manufacturer  s 
GALT,  ONTARIO,  CANADA 

The    Canadian    Fairbanks-Morse  Company,    Limiteil 
Sales  Agents 


Machine  Tools  In  Stock 


DRILLING  MACHINES 

1_28'  Sibley  Slidina'  Head  di-iH 

1 — 28"  Barnes  Sliding-  Head  drill 

1— 24"  Sibley  Sliding  Head  drill 

2 — 20"  Excelsior  back-geared,  W.  &  L.  feed 

8 — 20"  Champion  back-geared,  W.  &  L.  feed 

2—20"  Champion,  W.  &  L.  feed 

1 — 1"  capacity  Henry  &  Wright,  Class  B  drill 

1 — 16"  Reed  Single  Spindle  sensitive  drill 

1 — Sipp,  Type  B.W.,  ball-bearing,  high-speed  drill 

5 — 14"  Single  Spindle  sensitive  drill  presses 

1 — 14"  2-Spindle  Standard  sensitive  drill 

1 — 16"  2-Spindle  Reed  sensitive  drill 

1 — 14"  3-Spindle  Reed  sensitive  drill 

1 — 16"  4-Spindle  Henry  &  Wright  ball-bearing  sensitive 

drill  with  4  Jacobs  drill  chucks 
1 — 2^2     Swift  plain  radial  drill 
1 — 4'  Fosdick  plsin  radial  drill 

GRINDERS 

1— Style  B.X.  Yankee  twist  drill  grinder 

1 — Xo.  1  Fraser  Convertible  Universal  Tool  and  Surface 

1 — No.  3  Oesterlein  Universal  Tool  and  Cutter 

1 — Xo.  2  Oesterlein  Universal  Tool  and  Cutter 

1 — Dominion  Universal  Cutter  and  Tool 

1—16  X  2  Ford-Smith  Wet  Tool  Grinder 


MISCELLANEOUS 

1 — 2'   Universal  bolt  cutter 

1 — 6"  Foster  screw  machine,  powe '  feed,  to  cut  off  slide 

and  carriage,  complete  with  oil  pan  and  pump 
1 — No.  4  Foster  screw  machine,  complete  with  oil  pan 

anu  pump 
1 — 1"  Hercules  Screw  Machine 
1 — 2    Brown  &  Sharpe  vertical  chucking  machine 
1 — 48"  Bickford  vertical  boring  mill,  2  swivel  heads 
1 — Double  spindle  wood  shaper 
1 — American  Gas  Furnace  with  blower 
1 — 4^2"  Davies  cutting-off  machine 
1 — 36"  Preston  band  saw 

.^.IILLING  MACHINES 
1 — Xo.  1  Standard  hand  miller 
1 — No.  2  Ford-Smith  plain  miller 
1 — No.  2  Kempsmith  full  universal  miller 
1 — No.  0  KeniDsmith  full  universal  miller 
1 — No.  2.5  Ohio  Heavy  Duty  Universal 
1 — No.  2  Brown  &  Sharpe  heavy  dutv  plain  millav 
1 — No.   1  Bertram  back-geared  miller 

SHAPERS 
1—16"  Ohio  Heavy  Duty 
1 — 20"  Queen  City  back-geared 
1 — 20"  Ohio  Standard  Shaper 
1—20"  Ohio  Heavy  Duty 
1 — 20"  Smith  &  Mills  back-geared 


If  yon  have  not  received  our  neic  Stock  List  just  issued,  please  advise  us. 

The  Foss  &  Hill  Machinery  Company 

305  ST.  JAMES  ST.,    MONTREAL,  QUE. 


C  A  N  A  D  I  A  N    M  A  C  H  I  N  E  R  Y 


The  Guardians  of  Quality 

Our  trade-mark  "Cj.M.C.."  stands  for 
efficiency  throughout  our  entire  organi- 
zation and  forms  a  policy  of  Quality 
insurance  for  our  customers.  I'he 
stamp  C.M.C.  is  on  all  our  machines. 

Insure  satisfactory  machine  tool  per- 
formance by  insisting  on  (..M.C.  tools. 

Details  on  request. 


C.iVl,D. 


EEl 


CANADA  MACHINERY  CORPORATION 


Gait 


)  IMITC  D 

Ontario 


Canada 


Toronto  Showrooms  at  Brock  Ave.  Subway